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So trivial, yet it really ticks you off.

Bushman

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4,016
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Joliet
All cheese is a product of hell. Tis naught but rancid milk. The only exception I'll make is for the tasteless stuff on a pizza. Anything that actually tastes like cheese? Boak.
My mother is allergic to mold, and thus any cheeses that contain excessive amounts of it, but I love bleu. Goes well on burgers with bacon, in ham-wrapped chicken, and as a creamy sauce for hot wings! Yum!
 
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tonyb

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9,823
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^^^^^
I have yet to meet a blue cheese I didn’t like.

As a native Wisconsinite, born into a family of dairymen, cheese is a staple food, pretty much. But even I acknowledge that there’s something irretrievably wrong with Limburger. That stuff smells like it was aged in an outhouse — a three-holer, serving a family of a dozen or more.
 

Hercule

Practically Family
Messages
953
Location
Western Reserve (Cleveland)
^^^^^
I have yet to meet a blue cheese I didn’t like.

As a native Wisconsinite, born into a family of dairymen, cheese is a staple food, pretty much. But even I acknowledge that there’s something irretrievably wrong with Limburger. That stuff smells like it was aged in an outhouse — a three-holer, serving a family of a dozen or more.
Agree regarding blue cheese!

As for limburger, my one and only exposure was in Germany when I was on a highschool tour. Partucularly nasty yet the old folks with us at the time devoured it. I didn't get past the smell. I wouldn't mid giving it a try now that I am more refined. What I absolutely detest is processed american cheese, and it seems to be on everything these days.
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
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9,823
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My mother's basement
^^^^^^
I was once a regular customer at a breakfast-and-lunch joint called Debbie’s Cafe on East Jefferson Street in Seattle. Debbie (yes, there was a Debbie; she had a gold tooth, right there in front) operated what was the best sort of greasy spoon. She knew her clientele, mostly men, and she knew what they wanted — spuds and meat and eggs.

A somewhat cleaner-living and often-vegetarian friend joined me there on many an occasion, for the cultural enrichment more than the cuisine. He typically had an omelette filled with vegetables and cheese. But Debbie used American cheese, which the friend couldn’t abide. So he brought Debbie cheddar, which she happily used. Costed her less that way.
 
Messages
11,400
Location
Southern California
You should try this heavenly gift from France.


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When I was growing up my family and I didn't eat out often, but when we did Dad always ordered a salad to begin his meal and, regardless of whether or not there was even a remote chance the restaurant might have some, he always asked if they had Roquefort dressing for his salad. They never did, so I never had an opportunity to try it. But one of these days...
 

tonyb

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9,823
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My mother's basement
When I was growing up my family and I didn't eat out often, but when we did Dad always ordered a salad to begin his meal and, regardless of whether or not there was even a remote chance the restaurant might have some, he always asked if they had Roquefort dressing for his salad. They never did, so I never had an opportunity to try it. But one of these days...
Used to be that the terms blue (or bleu, if one prefers) cheese and Roquefort salad dressing were pretty much interchangeable. But then the public overall became more knowledgeable on such matters (compare the food varieties available to us today to what they were 60 years ago) and learned that Roquefort was but a type of blue cheese.

It’s getting to be that way with brie. Numerous varieties, and the distinctions matter to some people.
 

tonyb

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9,823
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My mother's basement
^^^^^
I’ll eat brie, but it’s generally so mild as to be somewhat less than satisfying.

The lovely missus has a friend who craves Camembert. So we know what to bring whenever we pay a visit.
 

Tiki Tom

Call Me a Cab
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2,537
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
Reminds me of the time that some of my compatriots sent back the Camembert, saying it had obviously gone bad. The Belgian owner of the inn brought it to us and said “can’t stand to see it go to waste. I know you’ll appreciate it. On the house.” It was delicious. We still laugh about it.
 

GHT

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,245
Location
New Forest
Used to be that the terms blue (or bleu, if one prefers) cheese and Roquefort salad dressing were pretty much interchangeable. But then the public overall became more knowledgeable on such matters (compare the food varieties available to us today to what they were 60 years ago) and learned that Roquefort was but a type of blue cheese.

It’s getting to be that way with brie. Numerous varieties, and the distinctions matter to some people.
That's what we Brits refer to as food snobs. The name being borrowed from the more familiar, wine snobs. Retailers are more than happy to indulge those types mind, charging a king's ransom as they pander to delicate palates.
 

tonyb

I'll Lock Up
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9,823
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My mother's basement
That's what we Brits refer to as food snobs. The name being borrowed from the more familiar, wine snobs. Retailers are more than happy to indulge those types mind, charging a king's ransom as they pander to delicate palates.
I was long an anti-snob — none of that espresso coffee or craft beer or microbrews or whatever they were calling that high-priced swill that week.

But that can become its own kind of snobbery, another sort of looking down one’s nose.

I discovered (in the years before I gave up drinking) that the more expensive beers really were superior, and it wasn’t that they gave away the cheap stuff. And espresso has been a daily (hourly) part of my life for a long time now, such that a pricy espresso machine and grinder and whole bean dark roast arabica is ALWAYS in our kitchen.

There’s a supermarket chain over stateside called Whole Foods (I hear y’all got ’em over in the UK, too), now owned by Amazon. It’s often called Whole Paycheck. Their angle is “natural” and “organic” foods, which was but a niche market not so long ago. But there’s obviously more than a few bohemian types buying that sort of stuff these days. Even the local King Soopers (Kroger) now boasts that it is the largest organic food store in the state. I doubt that’s all marketing hyperbole. It sells much more than than good healthy hippie stuff — it’s huge, something on the order of 80,000 square feet, so there’s plenty of room on its shelves and bins for the higher end products. The company wouldn’t allocate the shelf space if it weren’t selling.

Even with the fancy foods on offer these days and the recent spikes in food prices, we Americans spend a relatively small portion of our incomes on food.
 
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