The Era -- Day By Day

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by LizzieMaine, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The doggie just wants to play! Look, he's smiling! Nice doggie!!!!
     
  2. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    It's a good twist having the dog hanging on as the plane takes off.
     
  3. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    I believe Hu-Shee will meet a tragic end, rubbed out of the script.
     
  4. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee predicts that the Senate will amend President Roosevelt's Lend-Lease British Aid bill to require "reasonable security" from Great Britain for arms and material. Expressing his unqualified support for the measure, Senator Walter F. George explained at a press conference yesterday that by "reasonable security" he does not mean pledges of money, and he emphasized that America is not "out for some parsimonious deal."

    Meanwhile, incendiary and explosive bombs rained down again on London last night as squadrons of heavy German bombers passed over the British capital in a "short but intensive raid." The fires at one point were so bright that one could read a newspaper on the roof of a building by their light. The bombers also hit three districts in Southern England.

    One man was killed and another seriously wounded in a spectacular fire yesterday afternoon in a four-story rooming house in the Prospect Heights district. The fire at 475-A Dean Street began on the second floor and spread quickly, and the dead man appeared to have been overcome by the smoke before he could reach an exit. His body was burned beyond recognition. The injured man, 31-year-old Sven Dahlveg, was asleep in his third-floor room when the fire erupted. He quickly gathered his belongings and threw them out the window, and was rescued from a building ledge with a fire ladder. He is in Jewish Hospital in serious conditions with first and second degree burns to his face, hands, neck, and body. The building sustained an estimated $7500 in damage. It is owned by the A. G. Spalding & Bros. sporting goods firm, and provides housing for workers in its factory around the corner on Pacific Street.

    Police in Queens are mystified by the unauthorized exhumation of a woman buried last Tuesday in Lutheran Cemetery. The grave of 49-year-old Mrs. Elsie Zinck of 332 E. 77th Street in Manhattan, who died January 3rd, was opened sometime late Friday, and both the outer and inner coffins were opened, with Mrs. Zinck's body left half out of the casket. A trench measuring about 30 feet by 8 feet had been dug alongside the grave. The undertaker responsible for Mrs. Zinck's burial, J. J. Stolbs of 1369 1st Avenue, Manhattan confirmed that no jewelry or other valuable items were buried with Mrs. Zinck, The dead woman's husband, Mr. Joseph Zinck, and her brother-in-law, Charles Lotterhos, were both questioned and could offer no explanation for the mystery.

    The mascot of the U. S. Coast Guard base at Floyd Bennett Field was buried full military honors yesterday behind the base garage. Bruno, the 185-pound St. Bernard dog who had been affiliated with the base for the past year and a half, was killed in an airfield accident yesterday while helping to pull chocks from under the wheels of an idling plane. Bruno was borne to his grave by an honor guard of 80 Coast Guardsmen, and after Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Lee Day read "Eulogy to a Dog," a lengthy paen to Man's Best Friend, the men stood at attention while packing-case casket was lowered into the ground to the muted sound of "Taps."

    Announcing a tightening of his noise-abatement crusade, Mayor LaGuardia today ordered Police Commissioner Lewis J. Valentine to begin within five days a full inspection of every bus and taxicab horn in the city. Horns that play musical progressions are absolutely forbidden in the city, stressed the Mayor, and any that are discovered will be subject to confiscation. The Mayor also reminded all motorists that the sounding of horns for any reason other than to warn of immediate danger is prohibited by law, and violators are subject to the loss of drivers' licenses.

    A 16-year-old Brownsville boy who asked a passing patrolman for help in starting his car is under arrest for larceny. Patrolman Edward Hatch of the Liberty Avenue precinct noticed the boy in a stalled car at the intersection of Riverdale Avenue and Osborne Street and soon discovered that the youth had stolen the car, owned by Hyman Kessler of 406 S. 3rd Street, from a nearby filling station where it had been taken for repair. The boy, who told the policeman he had merely taken the car for a ride, is being held on $1000 bail pending an appearance tomorrow in Adolescent Court.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_.jpg (Hey, those are MY glasses. So that's where I left them.)

    A substantial decrease in the Brooklyn rat population is anticipated following an eradication drive coming soon in the Ft. Greene district, where seven hundred dilapidated tenement houses are to be demolished to make way for a new housing project. The General Exterminating Corporation has been awarded a contract by the New York City Housing Authority to poison the rats in the buildings with baits laced with red squill, a substance deadly to rodents but harmless to dogs, cats, and humans.

    The new Queens telephone book is twenty-four pages thicker than the old one, with 7000 additional listings bringing the total to 182,409. The FAculty 2 and NEwtown 4 exchanges have been eliminated in the new directory, replaced by ILlinois 8 and BOulevard 3. Subscribers are reminded that they are required to surrender their old directory to the Telephone Company representative who will deliver the new one, and to check the old book carefully for money, memoranda, or other items which may have been stored between its pages before turning it in.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(1).jpg

    What will be the first attraction at the new Flushing Meadow Park opens this afternoon, when the first skaters take to the indoor rinks in the former New York City Building. Long-legged City Council President Newbold Morris will lace on skates to cut didoes alongside Eastern States Women's Skating Champion Charlotte Walker in a ceremonial "first skate" before the rinks are opened to the public. Outside, skaters will traverse a landscape resembling bombed-out London, with large sections of the abandoned World Of Tomorrow lying in heaps of shattered plaster, splintered lumber, and twisted steel. The Trylon and Perisphere remain in place across from the New York City Building, but with nearly a third of their white plasterboard sheathing torn away and their bare steel skeletons exposed to the winter sun. In the Amusement Zone, the "Living Magazine Covers" peep-show exhibit still stands intact among the rubble, but not for long. This morning a worker scratched a match along the enormous bulge of one of the scantily-clad models painted on the side of the building to light his pipe, and went inside to begin wrenching boards off the inner walls.

    Pitcher Cliff Melton -- the large-eared fellow they call "Mountain Music," "Mickey Mouse," and other names -- has come to terms with the Giants for 1941, as Bill Terry wonders if the one-time wunderkind will ever return to his 1937 form, where he won 20 games as the Polo Grounders won their last pennant. Last year, he showed a marked inability to go the distance, with only three complete games among his ten victories, with a lofty 4.90 earned run average. Also signed by the Giants for the coming season is outfielder Johnny Rucker, a fast and rangy fellow who was supposed to be the next big thing in 1940. He was not, and spent most of the season on the bench. Terry feels that the 23-year-old's improved late-season resurgence, however, bodes well for his chances to take over in center field for Mr. Stoneham's boys in 1941.

    Old Timer John P. Nelson lives in Pennsylvania now, but his heart remains in Boerum Hill, where remembers attending the old Hill School No. 9 on Degraw Street, back in the days when boys refused to wear shoes until forced to do so. One boy, he recalls, refused to don leather until there was snow on the ground.

    Fronting TREND this week, who else but our "notably-photogenic" Butch?

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(2).jpg

    Actor Paul Henried says "things are seldom as they seem" when it comes to Nazis. The most polished, gentlemanly, charming ones are always the worst. Mr. Henried plays just that type of Nazi in Elmer Rice's new play "Flight To The West," now on Broadway at the Guild Theatre. "Perhaps I can warn Americans," explains the Austrian-born actor, "not to be fooled into thinking that such gangsters are not gangsters just because they have attractive manners."

    Radio's Quiz Kids admit they didn't know much about New York before making their current visit to the metropolis -- and they knew even less about Brooklyn. "Brooklyn has the Dodgers," declared the Kids. "Or do the Dodgers have Brooklyn?"

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(3).jpg (Red should give up this cowboy stuff and join the NYPD.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(4).jpg (Nothing shall stop a paper boy in the swift completion of his appointed rounds.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(5).jpg (I once rode an elephant in a circus parade myself, and I can tell you -- it isn't much fun for the elephant.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(6).jpg (Meanwhile, back in the house, Bill fumes. "I'M THE COMEDY RELIEF IN THIS STRIP. ME. NOT THAT OLD FAT FOOL. GO BACK TO THE HOME, GRAMPS.")

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(7).jpg (You know, turned-up-visor Fazian spy guy, there's really no need for you to blow up this plane. Irwin and the bucket of gasoline-soaked rags he just stowed under the seat have that under control.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(8).jpg
    (It's just the phone company guy calling to tell you he's on the way up to confiscate last year's phone book.)
     
  5. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And in the Daily News...

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_.jpg "He-Stripper?" And just how old was Miss Carolee Gallagher in 1934?

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(1).jpg This morning I woke up in the middle of an unsettling dream about a pay phone. Couldn't get it to work, and was I running out of change. It's got to mean something, but go figure what.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(2).jpg Hope you saved the sales slip on your steam engine there.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(3).jpg Oh my. Mr. Am, the nice old man with the whiskers, first encountered Annie about four years ago, when he gave veiled indications that he was, in fact, the actual Abrahamic God. Or, as Sam calls him, "Dad."

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(4).jpg Y'know, Moonshine, with vaudeville coming back and all, you could probably book a week at the Flatbush with that act.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(5).jpg "Oil For The Lamps of China" was an old slogan used by the Standard Oil Company when it tried to corner the Asian market in the 19th Century. And even though these guys seem to be aligned with the KMT, most of the guerillas opposing the Invader in 1941 were affiliated with the Communists. So, just sayin', Terry, but you ought to be careful making jokes like that.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(6).jpg Yeah, but did you have to hurt the dog? That's ice cold.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(7).jpg Hey, let's fix Terry up with Salomey.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(8).jpg I've had neighbors like this.

    Daily_News_Sun__Jan_12__1941_(9).jpg Poor Chester. Shoulda stayed on that island after all.
     
  6. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Terry will prevail over all, except Hu-Shee. Our pearl will be cast back to the fateful sea.:(
    Feelin' some bad karma about that gal.
     
  7. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Hmm, I look forward to the follow up on this one. Depending on how the story goes, it could show up in some version in "Dick Tracy" later on. It's his type of story so far.


    I wonder if ASCAP and BMI are checking on these musical horns for licensing fees?


    The public prosecutor is considering switching the charge from larceny to stupidity.


    "I'm Jerry Lesihc. I run a couple of bookie joints." Why not add, "Let me give you my card and, if you show this to the guy at the door, you'll get a discount of the first two bets." I assume he knows he's talking to the police. It just shows that, quite often, the police let the bookie joints run even though everyone knew what was going on and where.


    You know how I feel about dogs (a tear came to my eye reading about Bruno above in the Eagle today), but I don't think they had much choice. I don't think they could have pulled him. It was a tough call, but I don't know what else they could have done.


    Or Salomey with Raven, just sayin' as I've alway thought Raven would be broadminded about these things.

    Kidding aside, it's always nice to see a non-stereotypical character like Salomey in '40s cartoons.
     
  8. EngProf

    EngProf A-List Customer

    Messages:
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    I know that Dan-Dunn-world is almost completely disconnected from reality, even for a comic strip, but the idea of cleaning a plane with gasoline in a closed building scared me just by reading it, even though D-D and idiot-Irwin don't really exist.
    Back in my hot-rod days the often-quoted statistic - intended to dissuade real-world morons from using gasoline for parts-cleaning - was that the vapors from 1-gallon of gasoline would equal the explosive force of 93 pounds of dynamite.
    Whether that number is exactly correct I don't know, but it's more than enough to blow the whole works up - building, airplane, and idiots in one big bang.
    The potential harm from that comic strip is that someone in the real world might be tempted to use gasoline for cleaning.
     
  9. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I was annoyed by "Dan Dunn" until I realized it's an operatic comic strip. As you note, it's not reality, just grand sweeping ideas and gestures as in an opera (without the music/singing). I was also annoyed by "The Gumps" until I saw that it is really a throwback to 19th century romanticism expressed in a 20th century comic strip. To be sure, these are just my opinions, but seeing these strips in these ways has helped me to understand and appreciate them.
     
  10. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Every once in a while you get a story in the Eagle about some poor housewife blowing herself up spotting stains out of her husband's work pants with gasoline. These kinds of incidents, and the lawsuits arising from them, are the reason why gas pumps, to this day, bear a sign that says "FOR USE AS A MOTOR FUEL ONLY."

    The odd emphasis on the fact that Irwin is using gasoline here, along with Turned Up Visor Fazian Guy's plan to blow up the plane seems kind of Chekhov's-gunnish, but Mr. Marsh has let such threads dangle before without addressing them, so we'll just have to see.

    Along with Dunn-as-Opera and Gumps-as-Victoriana, both of which are pretty much spot-on, I submit that Mary Worth should be read as "radio soap" -- Mary is no more, and no less, than Ma Perkins translated to the funnies. There will be other strips that follow this lead -- many of them -- but Mary was the first. And the plotting and characterizations in both "The Bungle Family" and "Moon Mullins" would fit neatly into two-reel movie comedy shorts. "Terry" started out as a pastiche of movie adventure serials, but it quickly evolved into something far more sophisticated, probably the only comic strip Henry Miller would have enjoyed. "Harold Teen" started out as an obvious lift from a Booth Tarkington novel. And "Dick Tracy" was originally intended as nothing more or less than a comic-strip version of a hard-boiled pulp detective -- the Tracy of 1931 had a lot less of the baroque weirdness of 1941, and correspondingly more blood and gore.

    The one strip that's really hard to type is "Annie." We've seen it go from gritty noir to not-so-quasi religious allegory over the past year, and both of those elements will come and go over the years. There will also be a lot of obvious Old Right-leaning political commentary, and phases of outright magical fantasy as we go along. Mr. Gray refuses to fit into anybody's boxes but his own.
     
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  11. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_.jpg
    One man is dead, and a wide area along the seashore in the Long Island town of Arverne has been reduced to smoking rubble following a five-alarm fire early this morning. The body of 71-year old Hyman Loew of 248 Beach 75th Street was found in the basement of a two-story frame house at that address. Loew was known to have left that building when the fire first broke out, but his wife told police he then disappeared, and it is believed that he returned to the burning house to retrieve some of his belongings. It was not determined yet whether Mr. Loew died from smoke inhalation or heart failure. The fire began about 1 AM in the framework of a Long Island Railroad overpass at Beach 76th Street and Beach Channel Drive, and investigators believe that oil-soaked tarpaulins protecting the concrete supports of the trestle may have been ignited by a lighted cigarette butt discarded by a passing motorist. Fanned by high winds, the fire rapidly consumed the trestle and spread to thirty-two nearby houses before more than three hundred firemen were able to bring the blaze under control at 2 AM. Twenty families were routed from their homes into the cold night air, and total damage from the conflagration is estimated to be in excess of $100,000.

    A tense Congress is bracing itself today for its initial skirmish over the President's Lend-Lease bill, which received a sudden endorsement yesterday from Wendell L. Willkie. The defeated 1940 Republican Presidential nominee announced that he supports the bill "with modification," suggesting that while the extraordinary powers it would grant to President Roosevelt are appropriate in a time of national emergency, the language of the bill should be amended to grant those powers only "for a fixed term not too far in the future." Debate this morning in the House of Representatives focused on jurisdictionary matters, with the Military Committee attempting to take control of the measure away from the Foreign Affairs Committee, but there are indications that the House will vote to reject that propoal.

    British planes today pounded industrial targets in Germany and Italy, and on the Belgian invasion coast, with RAF bombers causing heavy damage to oil refineries in Regensburg, Porto Margera near Venice, and Ostend.

    Seven undergraduate leaders in the night section of Brooklyn College, including the president of the Student Council and the editor in chief of the campus weekly have been placed on "disciplinary probation" for "subterfuge and misrespresentation" and "attempting to entice students to violate the rules." The disciplinary action was reported today by the Faculty and Student Committee for Student Groups, which charged that the seven had conspired to hold "unauthorized meetings" of the Trade Union Forum, with the Committee reaching its verdict based on printed matter issued by "the Provisional Committee to Defend Brooklyn College." The seven will be ineligible to hold any student office or serve on any committee for six months.

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(1).jpg
    (Watch where you put that hand, Newb, or Butch will lay you out flat.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(2).jpg ("Hey Sal," says Joe. "Didjasee...." "Did I see what?" growls Sally, carefully enunciating each word. "Umm.....Dan Dunn." says Joe. "Didjasee -- ah -- Dan Dunn today?")

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(3).jpg
    (I know *I'LL* never forget this show, because it was during a production of it that I took a big deep swig out of a glass that was supposed to be water but some dink backstage had filled with gin. I smelled something funny just before it went down, but I thought it was cleaning fluid they'd used to mop the stage.)

    Reader E. J. H. Meilke of Lindenhurst, New Jersey writes in to protest recent calls for the banning of all foreign-language publications and the speaking of foreign languages in public. "Progress can only be achieved," he declares, "by intercourse and exchange with foreign lands, and a lack of knowledge of their language and customs hampers others and ourselves."

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(4).jpg
    ("Of course, with that big defense budget this year, we wouldn't expect any problems...")

    Displaying all the gallop of a bevy of dressmakers' dummies, the Americans today wheezed into a one-week layoff with an energy that would be the envy of the Old Mens' Home, after falling to the Rangers 3-1 at the Garden. The Amerks haven't got anything, and plenty of it, and the Rangers couldn't be happier with the results. The Bungle Family of the National Hockey League saw twelve straight goals sail into the net over the last two games, with their 9-0 drubbing by the Maple Leafs on Saturday followed by the Rangers racking up a 3-0 lead last night before Dutton's Dopes managed to score a single.

    National League Most Valuable Player Frank McCormick of the Reds doesn't think much of Our Dodgers, and he isn't shy about saying so. Big Frank tells Harold Parrott he can't see the '41 Flock with a spyglass, stating that they'll finish even further behind this year than they did last year. Frank is "best pals" with Fred Fitzsimmons, but he says he can't see Fat Freddie matching his 1940 performance in the coming season "Just imagine," he marvels, "16 won and 2 lost -- at his age! It just doesn't make sense!" McCormick also doesn't think much of Dixie Walker, dismissing Brooklyn's best hitter of 1940 with "he doesn't have much punch and doesn't figure to have as good a year again."

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(6).jpg
    (To be fair, there are some decent BMI songs on the air, but they're outweighed by the forgettable and the routine. The average BMI songwriter is about as good as the average ASCAP writer -- but BMI doesn't have the *great* songwriters, and their absence is painfully felt on the networks. And the public domain stuff is already past ridiculous -- when a swing arrangement of "Skip To My Lou" showed up on Fred Allen's show, I just rolled my eyes.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(7).jpg (Y'know, Sparks, you'd do Mrs. Snellbad a big favor by smacking this pisher in the head.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(8).jpg
    ("The Bungle Family of the National Hockey League" is actually a great idea for a new storyline. Butchie here can be the puck.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(9).jpg (Well, that took a grim turn.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(10).jpg (NOBODY EXCEPT HALF OF LONG ISLAND WHOM I HAVE AWAKENED WITH MY BASSO PROFUNDO!)
     
  12. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And in the Daily News...

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_.jpg
    Ew.

    Today's "Neighbors" is a pip, though -- Mr. Clark really should have been an animator with the sense of movement and energy he puts into his stuff. But the kid should tell Ma and Pa that the Charleston went out fifteen years ago.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(1).jpg
    Aw, back to the talking food again. At least this one is less creepy than the pie.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(2).jpg "Friday" is a left-leaning alternative to "Life," with the same kind of picture-driven articles and essays energetically presented to counter Mr. Luce's unrelenting anti-labor point of view. With its finger ever-ready to poke the NAM in the eye, it won't get much advertising, and there will be pressure on newsdealers not to carry it, but if you can find a copy it's pretty jaunty reading.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(3).jpg
    If Mr. Am set his beard on fire by accident, would that be "the burning bush?"

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(4).jpg You know, if "Pittsburgh Phil" was here, he'd do all of you with an icepick.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(5).jpg Speaking of icepicks...

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(6).jpg "And wait'll you meet my uncle's mother-in-law!"

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(7).jpg Bonehead! You could have wired her care of the station and it would have been waiting for her when she pulled in.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(8).jpg Psst, Lana -- with your brains you could be running the whole company.

    Daily_News_Mon__Jan_13__1941_(9).jpg I would have sworn Willie always rode *under* the train.
     
  13. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    On an empty stomach and if you're not used to drinking, you would definitely feel, at minimum, a little light headed from that.


    :)


    Five men, five bald heads - on par for Lichty.


    Freddie Fitzsimmons: "Et tu, Frank"


    "Sparky Watts" channeling its inner "The Gumps."


    Growing up in the '70s, there were three types of parents.

    Mine were older parents firmly stuck in the Golden Era with no interest in the "youth" culture. They were embarrassing at times, but in an understandable way.

    Some younger parents were able to bend a bit to the new younger culture without embarrassing themselves.

    The third category were the parents who had no idea what the younger culture was really about, but they tried anyway to adopt it and it was horribly embarrassing.

    Witnessing all that, I was glad my parents just stayed in their old culture.


    Translated into our modern crude culture, Bucky just told Terry he can watch. That's cold dude.


    Yup and, as noted earlier, she can and should do much better than Harold.
     
  14. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Bucky is just a bit too cocky and stuck on himself, I think. Hu Shee is not going to put up with that stuff for very long. Someone who's been trained in combat by the Dragon Lady herself isn't about to be anyone's fawning admirer.
     
  15. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    I wondered if those slenderizing machines really did work. I know for myself I'd enjoy it rolling out the kinks in my tight muscles.

    That was ice cold of Joy to hit the dog.:mad:
     
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  16. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    1 (2).png 2 (2).png 3 (2).png

    Hooray to a happy ending.
     
  17. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Hopefully Downwind won't show up tomorrow looking all pathetic and saying his girlfriend threw him out. "Which one?" says Jack.
     
  18. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Auguries, omens, vagaries, vicissitudes intrinsic to star script and strip, and most perceptible
    to me Celtic nature Chicago south side self, I feel the hebie jebies, big time. Hu-Shee is doomed.
    Our pearl is in peril. Woebegone.
     
  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    As a huge dog fan, I agree. It breaks your heart to see it. But also, as presented here - the plane was going to crash into the trees if they didn't reduce the weight the plane was carrying immediately - I don't know what else they could've done in the split second they had to decide.

    3 (2).png
     
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  20. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    That's a pretty snazzy little house, too. Right out of "Better Homes and Gardens."
     

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