The Era -- Day By Day

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by LizzieMaine, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,300
    Location:
    New York City
    A pang of sadness shot through me just from seeing that, sadly, iconic image of Raven. You wonder if they chose it to be provocative or if it was just grabbed by some clueless staff writer told to blend up some images of T&TP.


    "If Gray would bring me back, I could be a big help to the war effort. Sure, a few officials and others would have to "look the other way" now and then, but it would all be to advance the bigger goal of winning the war."
    Daily_News_Wed__Jun_12__1940_(3).jpg


    Once he gets a Chigger hairpiece, he'll believe he's God's gift to women.
     
  2. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest
    Another Chicago Trib editorial cartoonist of note: Joseph Parrish.

    upload_2022-1-9_8-24-39.png
     
    Harp and Fading Fast like this.
  3. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,093
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Lizzie,

    WGN for World's Greatest Newspaper is fine. :D
     
  4. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest
    By its own admission, no less.

    upload_2022-1-9_14-1-22.png
     
    Harp likes this.
  5. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,093
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Politics is forbidden in the Lounge counselor. ;):)
     
    ChiTownScion likes this.
  6. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The German radio hinted today that opponents of Nazi rule in Rumania may be preparing for an armed revolt, while Swedish correspondents in Berlin were "authoritatively requested" to deny in their dispatches that there were signs of an impending coup in the Nazi capital itself. Radio Moscow expanded on reports circulating in Allied countries by asserting that there is "growing dissension" between Army leaders headed by Marshal Goering and Adolf Hitler. It was further reported that the Gestapo has been ordered "increase its watch" of Goering. Berlin reported in a news dispatch from Bucharest that many Rumanian soldiers returning from the Russian front have "failed to surrender their arms," and then revealed by indirection that at least some of those acted out of "political motivations."

    As the rumors of a Hitler-Goering rift circulated, it was made known that three "traitors" were executed in the German capital, one of whom was said to have possessed "a store of arms." Informants stated that German authorities are treating the reports with "surprising seriousness," and the Nazi Propaganda Ministry, which usually dismisses such reports with a few contemptuous words, this time emphatically denied the coup rumors twice, once Thursday and once yesterday. Berlin broadcasts today denied that machine gun posts are being constructed at strategic points in the German capital, or that any other steps were being taken against "an imminent uprising." A dispatch released by the official Italian news agency described as "idiotic and ridiculous" rumors of differences between the German Army and the Nazi Party.

    Russia asserted today that German troops are surrendering en masse, and that in the Staritsa sector northwest of Moscow, German units are in full southwestward retreat, abandoning arms, guns, vehicles, and ammunition. A communique released by the official Soviet news agency Tass stated that "this testifies to the growing demoralization of the Fascist armies."

    British defenders of Malaya fell back again today before furious Japanese pressure on the Kuala Lumpur front, as dispatches questioned how long military headquarters could be maintained in the fighting zone some 200 miles north of Singapore. A Japanese news agency report broadcast over the Tokio radio claimed that British forces have abandoned defense lines in Kuala Lumpur sector, permitting the "peaceful entry" of Japanese forces into that key communications and rubber city.

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_.jpg
    (Well Known Dodger Rooter Eddie Betan was renowned for having the loudest voice at Ebbets Field, not excepting Hilda Chester and Fierce Jack Pierce. If there's anybody who'll make an excellent warden, it's him.)

    Police Commissioner Lewis J. Valentine praised 4000 Brooklyn air raid wardens of the 71st Precinct in an assembly last night as "evidence of what organization can do." Gathered at the 51st Regiment Armory after an evening march from Ebbets Field, the wardens, bearing flags and wearing armbands identifying their duties, were led in the Pledge of Allegience by Federal Judge Grover M. Moskowitz, who declared "if people thought the United States would be divided in the event of war, they were greatly mistaken." Since the attack on Pearl Harbor, the number of volunteer wardens in the city has doubled, standing now at 220,000.

    Police and Federal agents are searching today for two men who attempted to break into the confidential files of Local Draft Board No. 231, at 455 Crescent Street. A 23-year-old draft board clerk, Miss Alice Leventhal of 720 E. 53rd Street, reported that she was about to close the office at 6:30 pm last night when two men walked into the office and made a beeline for the filing cabinets where the records of all men registered with Board No. 231 are kept. Miss Leventhal told police she tried to bar their way, but she was "slapped and tossed aside" and fell to the floor unconscious. When she awakened, the men were gone, and the files appeared to be undisturbed. The clerk ran from the second-floor office to the drug store on the ground floor of the building and reported the incident to druggist John Nisselson and his wife Lillian, who recalled that someone had set fire to a sign on the draft board's office door the previous night, suggesting a previous attempt had been made to gain access to the files.

    A stock of several thousand dollars in new and used tires was destroyed by fire last night in Bushwick. The blaze at the warehouse of the Auerbach Tire Works broke out around 10pm last night, and left the two-story building in ruins and the neighborhood cloaked in acrid fumes and dark smoke for hours afterward. Cause of the fire has not been determined.

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(1).jpg
    (The war's not supposed to be funny. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA. The war's not supposed to be...HAHAHAHAHA)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(2).jpg
    (SO THERE)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(3).jpg
    (Again with the bridge jokes? The Lichtys must be at it again.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(4).jpg ("Well," says the Champ, "Since I've got a little time left, might as well take care of Nova too...")

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(5).jpg ("Wynn Murray, who used to be sweet and fat, is now less fat and plays a tough girl." Yeah, smart guy, and she knows where you live.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(7).jpg (Doc tries to remember how to reverse the polarity.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(9).jpg (Sorry, no refund on the deposit.)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(10).jpg (SAY NO OR YOU'LL REGRET IT FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE)

    Brooklyn_Eagle_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(11).jpg ("At last!" says the Chief to Kay. "I told you it'd work!")
     
  7. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And from the World's Greatest Broadsheet --

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_.jpg
    "Wait Till Next Year?" Isn't that a Brooklyn thing?

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(3).jpg
    And remember, that's KROPP with an O. Be sure to get that right.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(1).jpg
    Just what were the odds on this horse, anyway?

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(2).jpg
    Awwww....

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(4).jpg
    Ummm, isn't disorderly conduct an actual thing where you have to take them in and book them and all that? ISN'T IT???

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(5).jpg
    MANILA AND SINGAPORE???? Caniff just can't catch a break.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(6).jpg
    "Other reasons I won't bore you with now." Very out of character for Nina. That doctor's a bad influence.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(7).jpg
    It's nice to have sympathetic friends.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(8).jpg
    I used to go to "Dr. Dubb" myself.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_10__1942_(9).jpg
    Ooooh, big tough guy in his gangster sport coat.
     
  8. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,300
    Location:
    New York City
    Well, it's from "the official Italian news agency," now I'm convinced.


    Considering the shortage and importance of tires right now, this couldn't look more suspicious.


    Why is Viking Hitler missing a leg?


    "Cliff, we need your column now."
    "I don't have anything good."
    "Don't care, we need it now."
    "Here, then take this."
    "That's lousy and short, don't you have more?"
    "It's all I got."
    "Winchell always has a full column."
    "Shut up."


    Chief: "I told you it'd work!"
    Kay: "We should have sent Irwin along with Dan on this assignment."
    Chief: "Yes."


    Good one, Lizzie.

    Did the copywriter of this ad ever take a course in English?


    It was his maiden race - so no history, of a horse with no pedigree and an unknown owner and first-time trainer. Easily north of 50-1 and probably well north. The Gumps' bets and a few "long-odds" better were probably the only money put down on the horse.


    "With my old agent, I'd have never been in panel three today. God my ears are cute."
    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Dec_28__1941_(2).jpg


    Hard to see a problem with this plan working for a fifty-plus year marriage.

    Can't help wondering what's going on in Ed's marriage right now.
     
  9. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,093
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Thoroughbreds on my mind this morning. Last Preakness when Rombaugher played thief
    despite Crowded Trade being the most accomplished horse in this race and ridden by Mike Smith,
    Keelerman supposed Rombaugher for the steal. Don't follow the Gump strip but a nice dollop of cream
    in my morning coffee.;):)
     
    Fading Fast likes this.
  10. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest
    [​IMG]

    A line between "setting things right" for his pal Goofy in the anticipated marriage, and the motive of unabashed payback. When will Harold cross it- or has he already crossed it?
     
    Fading Fast likes this.
  11. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,134
    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest
    Fading Fast likes this.
  12. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,300
    Location:
    New York City
    The only way I can appreciate "The Gumps" is by thinking of the strip as a throwback to the Romantism style of literature. In that context, the strip makes sense to me. Similarly, "Dan Dunn" only works if I think of it as opera.


    Very cool.
     
    ChiTownScion likes this.
  13. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Prediction: Goofy is finally going to say ENOUGH IS ENOUGH, punch Harold in the face, and conduct his affairs as he sees fit. And Harold, when he wakes up, will be a wiser man for the experience, at least until the next stupid thing he does.

    Long ago, Goofy and Harold were partners in the ownership of a car, the famous "Leapin' Lena."

    Chicago_Tribune_Tue__Apr_6__1926_.jpg
    You'd think Goofy would know better than to take advice from him. But, on the other hand, his name is "Goofy."

    I always enjoy seeing the Gumps tossing around huge bundles of loose cash. That must be a nice thing to be able to do.
     
    Fading Fast likes this.
  14. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,300
    Location:
    New York City
    There is definitely a Scrooge Mcduck theme that runs through the Gumps.
    AAKz.gif
     
  15. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I always felt that Unca Scrooge was directly inspired by Uncle Bim, right down to the globetrotting adventure stories which seem oddly similar to Chester Gump's Sunday page tales. I wonder if the Tribune-News Syndicate people ever noticed that?
     
    Fading Fast likes this.
  16. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,093
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Harold undoubtedly immature and far from the sharpest knife in the comics drawer seems penciled
    without lead, a no red blooded lead-in-pencil Lothario, all bark and no bite. Asinine going nowheres fast
    story board. Like Terry the feeling is buyin' time. Trying to get a sense of things, see what's what,
    what's not. April Kane is dragging like Hector, and Harold doesn't quite get where to get off the kid act
    and grow up. A Terry Lee revision, no end in sight.
     
    ChiTownScion likes this.
  17. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The Red Army is striking sledgehammer blows against a "hasty effort" by Adolf Hitler to rush reinforcements into the central front, where dispatches report mass surrenders by "demoralized Axis troops." All reports from the Russian front, from the Crimea to Leningrad, indicate the Soviet counteroffensive continues to gain momentum as it surges forward west of Moscow and steadily expands its scope. Radio Berlin today acknowledged that there has been "some penetration of German lines" by heavy Red Army tank attacks. The Soviet air force is unofficially reported as having blasted as many as 83 troop-laden German trains along the great network of railroads extending as far west as the Baltic states, more than 400 miles from the nearest Russian air base.

    A broadcast by Radio Berlin monitored in London asserted that the Germans have erected a "wall of blood" against the Soviet forces, as compared to the concrete Siegfried line once built against France. The German broadcast also claimed that those Soviet forces that did pierce the "wall of blood" have been turned back, while other Russian attacks were repulsed with heavy losses.

    Broken Axis mechanized forces were reported fleeing "hell for leather" from the Libyan battleground of Agedabia, 90 miles south of Bengazi toward El Aghelia on the Tripolitania frontier, retreating with such speed that pursuing British Imperial forces were unable to keep up with them. A British military spokesman stated that while the British have not yet encountered the main body of General Erwin Rommel's retreating Afrika Korps, the British columns have engaged the rear guards sent out as a covering force.

    American and British fliers over Rangoon, seizing the initiative for air supremacy over Burma, today had boosted to 18 the total of Japanese fighter planes destroyed in a series of enemy attacks on enemy air bases in eastern Thailand. Successive raids have been in progress all week.

    A former Brooklyn junk dealer who clashed with the law in Austria in 1930 and flew the Atlantic with Clarence Chamberlain in 1927 was arraigned yesterday in Manhattan District Court on charges that he helped smuggle a German alien into the United States. Charles A. Levine was arrested at his Manhattan apartment by FBI agents who accused him of conspiring to German national Edward Scinek, alias Edward Siegel, into this country by way of Los Angeles. Scinek admitted to knowing Scinek, and also to knowing Los Angeles hotel manager Peter Walter, who is also charged in the case, but denied knowledge of the alleged smuggling. In addition to the counterfeiting charge laid against him by authorities in Vienna twelve years ago, Levine has an extensive criminal record in the United States. In 1932 he received a suspended sentence at Mineola for violations of workers' compensation laws at his former Brooklyn junk yard, and in 1937 he was sentenced to a Federal prison term for smuggling tungsten. He attempted suicide by gas at the home of his brother in 1934, and in 1939 was divorced in Reno by his second wife. He is being held in Federal custody on $1000 bond.

    A unifed Civilian Defense setup in Brooklyn has been organized by District Attorney William O'Dwyer and borough Civilian Defense Director Mary E. Dillon, under authority granted by Mayor LaGuardia, including the formation of a new Public Information Committee to be charged with the timely distribution of vital Civilian Defense instructions. Dr. Paul D. Shafer, president of Packer Collegiate Institute, will chair the new committee. Also appointed to serve as Civilian Defense liason to Brooklyn veterans' groups was Brig. Gen. William A. Taylor of Bay Ridge, who led Brooklyn's 106th Infantry against the Hindenburg Line in 1918.

    A television appeal has sold $75,000 worth of defense bonds in the city. The Columbia Broadcasting System's television station WCBW last night telecast an image of a telephone along with a phone number viewers could call to pledge their purchases. Larry MacPhail of the baseball Dodgers and Dan Topping of the football Dodgers each called the number to pledge $5000 each.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_.jpg (Not quoted here is Louis's most succinct statement on the war. When asked why he was willing to enlist in a segregated Army, he replied "Lots of things wrong with this country. But Hitler won't fix them.")

    Service flags such as those flown during the first World War should be flown by every Brooklyn home with a man in the Armed Forces. So requested Borough President John Cashmore yesterday, who called display of the blue-star banners "one of the strongest boosts for morale" available. Mr. Cashmore recalled that in 1917 and 1918, banners displayed by downtown business firms often bore hundreds of blue stars, each representing an employee who had been called to service.

    As quietly as they became engaged, 21-year-old screen star Mickey Rooney and 18-year-old Ava Gardner, New York model turned actress, were married yesterday in Ballard, California, a small town about 40 miles from Santa Barbara. The newlyweds, married by a Presbyterian minister, left immediately on their honeymoon.

    With tire rationing now a reality, authorities are urging motorists to take necessary steps to conserve the rubber they already have by altering their driving habits. Never drive your car faster than 40 miles an hour -- and if you have recapped "war tires," never faster than 35. Reduce or completely halt all pleasure driving, and double-up or carpool with friends and neighbors wherever possible. Avoid "jack rabbit" starts, stops, skids, and turns. Check your wheels frequently for misalignment, and rotate all tires, including your spare, every 5000 miles. Inspect your tires regularly and make repairs promptly. If they are badly worn, have your tires recapped. And if all else fails? Get a horse.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(1).jpg (And of course the golf-ball shortage didn't help. Tennis, most likely, will be next to go.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(2).jpg (Mungo won't report to Minneapolis because it's "too cold up there?" I bet if he thinks hard, he can find ways to keep warm.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(3).jpg (A fascinating bit of aviation lore.)

    Maestro Arturo Toscanini, who was once banished from La Scala in Milan because he refused to conduct his orchestra in the Fascist anthem, and was subsequently handled roughly by the Black Shirts before coming to the United States, is still officially an Italian citizen -- and is thus considered an enemy alien by the U. S. Government. The famed conductor was this week granted a permit to travel to Washington D. C. by Federal authorities, under regulations that make unpermitted travel by enemy aliens a violation of law that can mean confinement in an internment camp. The Maestro declared that he has deliberately chosen to remain an Italian citizen in order to prominently display to Mussolini that there are people of his nation who despise him.

    Old Timer Emma Towers Ramos recalls the long-ago days of the 1880s, when she was a bold recruiter for the Women's Christian Temperance Union, roaming the streets of Brooklyn Heights and inducing young men to Take the Pledge. But she also admits that she plied them on New Years' with lemonade mixed with claret wine, not realizing that wine had the same effects as liquor.

    Ever notice old cars in the movies? They're gathered for the occasions by specialists in the field, who know collectors who can supply a 1904 Stanley Steamer, an 1899 Ford, or a 1905 Pope-Toledo with just a phone call. But what about cars that aren't that old? That's more difficult than you think, especially for cars built between 1919 and 1927. Those cars aren't old enough to interest collectors, but they are old enough to have almost entirely vanished from the streets -- and it's a real headache for the prop departments when a picture is set during that period. Just recently, ten cars built between 1920 and 1923 were needed for the Brian Donlevy-Miriam Hopkins picture "Heliotrope Harry" being filmed at the Edward Small Studio for United Artists, and it took the prop department more than a week to find them.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(4).jpg (And speaking of period detail, I didn't realize women were wearing 1942 hair in 18-whatever.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(5).jpg ("If his hands are as sticky with spirit gum as his face is, he'd never get the surgical gloves on!")

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(6).jpg (I've known a few failed chicken farmers who *didn't* become Nazis.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(7).jpg ("You tough boy!" I can see the girls in this school need some instruction in the art of the lacerating remark. And do they really have grip poles on a submarine like on the subway? END OF THE LINE, ALL OUT!")

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(8).jpg (It's all about the technique.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(9).jpg (I'm glad Tarz finally summed up the plot, because I'd completely forgotten why he was in the desert and what he was trying to accomplish.)
     
  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And from the World's Greatest Sunday Edition...

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_.jpg
    Cecil Travis may be the best baseball player who lost his career to World War II. He was a star of potential Hall of Fame credentials who had just reached his peak when he went into the service. In 1944 he will suffer severe frostbite at the Battle of the Bulge, and will earn the Bronze Star. But the damage to his feet will prove to be irreparable -- and after struggling to come back, he will be forced to retire in 1947 at the age of 34. Had he continued thru the war years at the pace he'd achieved during the seven full seasons he played before the war, he'd have gone down as the greatest third baseman of his era.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(1).jpg
    I really and sincerely do feel sorry for Donald L. Barnes.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(2).jpg
    From screwball comedy to yet another insane death trap in just thirteen panels. Gawdluvya, Chester Gould.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(3).jpg Of all the characters we follow, I identify most with little Judy Wallet.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(4).jpg Calling it now -- "Dr. Zee" is either Nick Gatt's brother or Nick himself in disguise.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(5).jpg A secret invention? Phooey! WHAT COULD BE MORE EXCITING THAN A LIVE DINOSAUR?

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(6).jpg "Nitro," huh? Better hope the DL doesn't find out what you do on your days off.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(7).jpg
    When you're a four-and-a-half feet tall, nineteen years old, and balding, you've got to compensate.

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(8).jpg Who says you can't joke about religion?

    Chicago_Tribune_Sun__Jan_11__1942_(9).jpg It's great to have lots of friends.
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    15,300
    Location:
    New York City
    This guy is practically scripted out of "Dick Tracy," especially if he has some kind of underground lair at his junk yard. Lizzie, think of the possible scenarios that could come up with a junk yard dog and a hunger for faces.


    Man did his life peak early.


    Well, Marble had some spy work to do anyway (at least according to her).


    I would have bet Fitz had pitched in more than 13 games last year.


    The badly named "Heliotrope Harry" was fortunately retitled "A Gentleman After Dark" before it was released.


    As noted yesterday, Marsh is very operatic in his storytelling approach. You can hear the score behind today's battle scene - something Marsh does very well.

    As to grip poles, my knowledge consists of submarine movies, but I seem to remember seeing something similar (not as prominent, though) in "The Hunt for Red October," but we should ask @Trenchfriend as no one knows that movie better than he.


    I had the exact same reaction, that was an incredible shift in the storyline in a mere thirteen panels - I have whiplash.


    That would be a really neat development.
     
  20. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I'm astonished that Mace Brown pitched more games than Fitz did. I remember when they picked up Brown and I remember when they sent him on his way, but I can't remember a single thing he did in between.

    I had no idea that tungsten smuggling was a thing. That might be the most Dick Tracy crime ever.
     
    Fading Fast likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.