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The Era -- Day By Day

LizzieMaine

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Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Thu__Jul_9__1942_.jpg

Mexico? Be sure to pick up some roofing tiles!

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"NOW LEAVE ME ALONE!"

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"Thanks. I think I'll be a judge someday myself. Hey, maybe I'll take YOUR job."

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"Goofy looking bird?" Look who's talking.

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"Well, there's always this Dr. Meagher from town. He's pretty incompetent as a doctor, but I guess he could pull weeds or something."

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There's one on every block.

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There's always a crash when the caffeine wears off.

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All in a day's work.

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Surely.

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"Wait'll they throw out the Addressograph though, those things are heavy!"
 
Messages
15,826
Location
New York City
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Jul_9__1942_.jpg
(There's something fishy about this Willie Robinson/Roberson story -- he was arrested in the Scottsboro case in 1931, and he was clearly not 9 years old at the time. Leibowitz would know by sight if this guy is actually the same man who was tried in the original case. And in other news, Mr. MacPhail must now be wondering if it's too late to get a refund on that organ.)
...

Of course there are a lot of other considerations, things like honor, integrity, pride, abiding the law and patriotism, to say nothing of having a record for life - but on a purely selfish "how will my next three years be" evaluation, the guy who was sentence to that term for avoiding the draft has a much better chance at survival and will do much less work. When his three years are up, is he free or does he get drafted then?

Every once in awhile, the American justice system does seem to give the not-powerful a voice, even on silly issues like the organ. My God, that MacPhail hasn't been able to get this case tossed says something good about American justice, even if I think Spencer is a jerk .


...

Supporters of Attorney General John J. Bennett for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination today hailed a statement by Democratic National Committee chairman Edward J. Flynn that, in his opinion, Bennett "has the necessary qualifications for the job" as laid out by President Roosevelt. Mr. Flynn emerged from a conference with the President in Washington yesterday, and revealed that the President considers Bennett, along with Senator James Mead, to fit his definition of "liberals who had supported the Administration's policy before Pearl Harbor." Democratic State Chairman James A. Farley received Mr. Flynn's comments with particular jubilation, having stated the previous day that Mr. Bennett suited the President's qualifications. More than half of state convention delegates have already pledged support to Bennett, and while Mr. Farley's endorsement is likely to carry weight with those who remain undecided, Mr. Flynn's political influence has been "on the wane" since his involvement in the Lake Mahopac paving-block investigation.
...

FDR: "Yes, yes, I understand, you fully endorse Bennett, but the real reason I asked you to join this meeting is because Eleanor and I would like your advice on what you think we should do with our back patio here at the White House as the flagstones are all cracked and we want to have it redone."


...

In Elmsford, a member of the New York City Board of Water Supply Police died yesterday after accidentally drinking a glass of household ammonia. 45-year-old Joseph Hussey, of Flushing, had served on the water police for about four months.
...

Challenge that this is an accident, just try taking even one tiny sip.


...
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(I wonder if Dingy and Jo are related?)
...

Tuthill has a very dour view of conversation.


And in the Daily News...
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Mexico? Be sure to pick up some roofing tiles!
...

Having grown up in New Brunswick, Camp Kilmer was right next door, but clearly trimmed down in size from its WWII days. Hard to believe the regular barracks had air-conditioning. One of the several local phone exchanges was KIlmer-5, (KI5 or 545), which was how my grandmother's phone number started.


...
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"Goofy looking bird?" Look who's talking.
...

"Fine, you jerk, but next time you get scared and scream for help, call out 'Oh Hon,' cause I won't be able to hear you from Reno."
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,092
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Jul_10__1942_.jpg

(Have to say I'm with Judge Masterson on this one. And as for young Mr. Walter Bartholomew, a clever young soda jerk can certainly make more of his life than he seems to be doing.)

Two members of the British Army Dental Corps, finding noncombatant duty too tame, face disciplinary action today after attempting to invade France. Twenty-seven year old Sgt. Peter King and 19-year-old Private Thomas Culberson are being held on charges of being absent without leave after abandoning their posts on April 11th to mount their own commando raid on Cherbourg. In a letter to Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the two dental corpsmen explained that they made their way to Plymouth, sleeping on the ground at night to harden themselves for the invasion, and on May 2nd, hired a motorboat for the channel crossing. Slipping by Nazi patrols, the two landed the boat off Cherbourg on May 4th, and were scaling the high cliffs when they heard German voices and decided to call off the raid. They returned to the boat, but ran out of gasoline while attempting to cross back to Britain, and floated in the Channel for fifteen days without food and only a pint of water until they were spotted by a plane, which sent a British destroyer to pick them up.

The police Bomb Squad was called to Woodhaven today to inspect a metal cylinder uncovered by workmen digging a foundation for a garage at 91-16 78th Street, and concluded that it was a gas bomb dating back to the First World War. The bomb was immersed in a pail of oil by police, and the owner of the property, Joseph Pristina, could not explain what it was doing in his yard.

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(If you think it's bad now, wait'll after the war.)

A supposed "refugee and friend of the Jews" will be arraigned today in Newark Federal Court on espionage charges. Herbert Karl Friedrich Bahr was seized by Federal agents aboard the repatriation liner Drottingholm after an examination of the 941 refugees and American citizens aboard the ship. Bahr is stated to be a graduate of a Nazi spy school who attempted to slip into the United States on a mission likely to do with aviation, since his brother George is employed in Buffalo at the Curtiss-Wright aviation plant. FBI agents continue today to question those aboard the ship in search of other spies planted among the refugees.

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(Anastasia isn't "missing." You just don't know where he is.)

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(People don't go to a Rodgers and Hart show for the plot. MGM should know better than that.)

The Eagle Editorialist warns against any effort to minimize the danger represented by the Japanese occupation of three of the Aleutian Islands. "There seems to be in Washington," he notes, "a tendency to belittle the seriousness of the situation." He observes that the possibility of Japanese air bases only 600 miles from Dutch Harbor poses a risk that endangers that area's use as a jumping-off point for future American raids against Japan, and that the presence of such a Japanese foothold on American soil also interferes with our ability to ship munitions and other vital supplies to the Soviet Union by way of the Northwest route. As long as the Japanese hold this territory, warns the EE, "they hold a pistol to our heart."

A Disgusted Taxpayer writes in to complain that "Brooklyn is the only city that allows noisy boys to play ball in busy streets," and demands that the police do something about the gangs of ball-playing youths who "make life hideous" for the residents of otherwise "quiet residential neighborhoods." Disgusted further denounces these kids for being too lazy to take their games to "one of Mr. Moses' playgrounds," declaring that "they want their fun right at their door."

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("It only works if you squeeze it from the bottom!")

In Telaviv, Palestine, the arrival of American troops has the locals going in for baseball, ice cream, and chocolate sodas in a big way. Local restuarants have changed their names to such titles as "Brooklyn Bar," "New York Eats," and "Detroit Delicatessen," and their proprietors are in strong competition to offer such delicacies as fried chicken and corn on the cob. "WE SPEAK AMERICAN" read big signs in the windows of many local establishments, and there are reports that local chemists are hard at work trying to brew an "imitation cola flavor" in absence of the genuine American product.

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(I'm surprised, given the history between these two clubs, that Mr. Wyatt "throwing the ball into the Cincinnati dugout" didn't spark more than just McKechnie springing out of that dugout. Throw it a little harder next time, Whitlow.)

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(Never mind the tire business, Dingly should be writing for Hollywood.)

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("I can't stay here! Bill's an idiot! The children will starve!")

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(Aren't you cold?)

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(No, Dan, that's a tattoo. She was a big fan of Douglas Fairbanks.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,092
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Fri__Jul_10__1942_.jpg

"Providing complaisant beauties for visiting playboys who were willing to pay well for the favor." Isn't there, I dunno, a word for that?

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"Striptease!" bellows Hilda Chester. "Hey, misteh!! Oveh heah!!!"

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"Humph! Not very likely!" It's the "Humph!" that really cuts deep.

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"I mean, if there's nobody here to ask for a warrant..."

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Ahhh, give her twenty years...

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Just don't mess around with all those bottles in the trailer.

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Why aren't you in the Army, Slick?

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You'll get yours.

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There is a time to speak and a time to keep silent.

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Oh, settle down kid, she doesn't like you THAT much.
 
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Location
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...

Two members of the British Army Dental Corps, finding noncombatant duty too tame, face disciplinary action today after attempting to invade France. Twenty-seven year old Sgt. Peter King and 19-year-old Private Thomas Culberson are being held on charges of being absent without leave after abandoning their posts on April 11th to mount their own commando raid on Cherbourg. In a letter to Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the two dental corpsmen explained that they made their way to Plymouth, sleeping on the ground at night to harden themselves for the invasion, and on May 2nd, hired a motorboat for the channel crossing. Slipping by Nazi patrols, the two landed the boat off Cherbourg on May 4th, and were scaling the high cliffs when they heard German voices and decided to call off the raid. They returned to the boat, but ran out of gasoline while attempting to cross back to Britain, and floated in the Channel for fifteen days without food and only a pint of water until they were spotted by a plane, which sent a British destroyer to pick them up.
...

Apparently, they transfer the really stupid ones to the Dental Corps.


...
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(Never mind the tire business, Dingly should be writing for Hollywood.)
...

Wheeler and Woolsey's rep is trying to buy the rights as we speak.


...
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"Striptease!" bellows Hilda Chester. "Hey, misteh!! Oveh heah!!!"
...

I wonder if this case moved up the legal chain and became precedent setting as this issue seems pretty much settled today. Although, now and then, a noise complaint will come up against a stadium, but we know who wins those battles. One has to believe, if not in this case, in some case, it went up the chain, precedent was set and that decides most of the cases. To be sure, there are local noise/governance issues, etc., but my guess is some over-arching legal precedent provides the framework.


...
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You'll get yours.
...

Hopefully, he will get his, but on a purely objective basis, he just made a darn-good chess move.
 

LizzieMaine

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Messages
31,092
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Jul_11__1942_.jpg

(And exactly HOW is the Westchester Medical Society getting the gasoline that it dispenses thru this secret mystery pump that moves to a new location from time to time? Just another reason why people don't like doctors. Especially doctors from Westchester.)

The trial of eight German saboteurs in Washington, still secret despite three announcements from the presiding seven-general military commission, entered its fourth day today with indications that it would last another week, and perhaps longer. Major General Frank McCoy, head of the commission would state only that the trial will require more time due to the heavy amount of evidence to be presented by both sides.

Meanwhile, the bogus "friend of persecuted Jews" arrested aboard a refugee ship this week will face a firing squad if he is convicted of treason. The death sentence would be mandatory if Herbert Karl Freidrich Bahr, a German-born naturalized U. S. citizen, is indicted for and convicted of betrraying the United States in a trial expected to begin on Tuesday. Bahr was siezed aboard the refugee liner Drottingham by Federal agents, and had $7000 on his person when he was taken into custody. Despite that money, Bahr has claimed that he cannot afford an attorney to represent him in his trial. Whether or not a charge of treason is added to the existing charge of espionage against Bahr hinges on the interpretation of citizenship laws -- and whether, in swearing allegiance to the Nazi Reich, he automatically forfeited his U. S. citizenship.

A new exhibit designed to urge Brooklyn housewives and others to greater efforts in promoting conservation and thrift opens today at the Brooklyn Museum. Entitled "The Consumers' Front," the exhibit occupies a large portion of the museum's front gallery, with its centerpiece a large map of the United States illustrating the difficulties involved in the wartime distribution of food and other vital articles. The routes followed by oil and coffee are particularly emphasized, with the shipping lanes followed by vessels carrying these commodities shown to be infested with Axis submarines. Another section of the exhibits illustrates how materials used in the manufacture of many common consumer products have now been diverted to military purposes. Mayor LaGuardia officially dedicated the exhibit. and in his remarks expressed concern over the continued wasting of food both in the city and nationwide, and urged the conservation of food as a sensible and patriotic duty.

("C'mon," urges Sally, as she presses a spoonful of mashed beets against Leonora's tightly-pursed lips. "Ya don' wan' LaGawdia comin' afteh ya!" "Poop," replies Leonora, with a wave of her arms. "Bummmmmm." "Aw," mutters Joe, "She been spendin' too much time wit'cha mutteh!")

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(Sorry, lady, that's what you get for not paying your protection money.)

The Eagle Editorialst calls Mr. S. Reid Spencer's battle against the Ebbets Field organ a "refreshing incident," the outcome of which is to be awaited with keen interest. Personally, the EE feels that "while there was a time when a little music at the ballpark in Flatbush might have been a welcome divertisement, more lately the addition of music seems to be sort of a painting of the lilly."

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(Seems like it would have to depend on the foreman.)

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(If you can't have a satisfying game story, at least you can have a good headline.)

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(Well, MOST people enjoy it. If you're a short pudgy bald guy or a Japanese army officer you might have a problem.)

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(Mr. Conreid will achieve his greatest success as one of radio's great character comedians, which is ironic, since he's actually a pretty funny-looking guy.)

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(Sibyl's got no time for this. She's booked the wedding hall for noon, and the divorce court for three.)

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("Ah! My good friend, my DEAR FRIEND Governor Blackston!" "No, I think he said he's an insurance adjuster." "Oh. Well, just let me alone to die now, thanks.")

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(Lancaster County? Funny, he doesn't look Amish.)

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("Pipe that" = "Look at," "get a load of..." Vintage Phrases that have Vanished...)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,092
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Sat__Jul_11__1942_.jpg

Not only is he a Nazi, but he laughs at his own jokes. SHOOT HIM NOW.

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Miss Lee was on the front of the News Sunday Coloroto magazine once before, in 1937, and I used to have a framed copy. It disappeared in a move, and I have suspicions that one of the movers helped himself.

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"We've been married a long time, haven't we?" "Yes we have. *sigh* Yes we have."

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Well this is a dirty bit of business.

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"Eh? Who are you? I've got a warrant, I've got a warrant right here!" (pulls gun.)

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Poor Min.

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"Yes, I'm going into the Army. The child? Oh, I suppose we'll slough her off into another foster home. She's used to it."

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They'd probably really appreciate a dancing penguin in a tutu.

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Hahahahahahaha!

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"I was about to say, I just don't want to end up like my poor roommate back home, who just sits and moons all day over this boy in some small town somewhere who broke her heart. I'd sure like to meet him and tell him off!"
 
Messages
15,826
Location
New York City
...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Jul_11__1942_(1).jpg



(Sorry, lady, that's what you get for not paying your protection money.)
...

It's been awhile since we've seen one in the news, but candy shops continue to be some of the most interesting places in 1930s/1940s America.


...
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(Sibyl's got no time for this. She's booked the wedding hall for noon, and the divorce court for three.)
...

I can't believe I'm saying this, but good for her, even Sibyl can do better than this wingnut.


...
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(Lancaster County? Funny, he doesn't look Amish.)
...

He's on his rumspringa.


Daily_News_Sat__Jul_11__1942_.jpg
And in the Daily News...


Not only is he a Nazi, but he laughs at his own jokes. SHOOT HIM NOW.
...

Only an editor fully confident in Page Four's raison detre would start an article about a major Hollywood stars' wife becoming a citizen with the words "Her tanned legs stockingless..."

One must be in complete command of one's job to truly excel.


...
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Miss Lee was on the front of the News Sunday Coloroto magazine once before, in 1937, and I used to have a framed copy. It disappeared in a move, and I have suspicions that one of the movers helped himself.
...

If Ms. Lee was a creation of fiction, you wouldn't believe it, but since she's real, she's fascinating. She has a very astute understanding of how she fits into 1940s culture and, more importantly, how to maximize that fit for her own benefit.


...
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"I was about to say, I just don't want to end up like my poor roommate back home, who just sits and moons all day over this boy in some small town somewhere who broke her heart. I'd sure like to meet him and tell him off!"

The only thing that could make this story better would be if Paulette and Lana were sisters and not just roommates.
 
Last edited:

LizzieMaine

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Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jul_12__1942_.jpg

(Mr. Shelton was one of the most notorious health quacks of his generation -- he was jailed on multiple occasions for practicing medicine without a license, despite his credentials from the Macfadden College of Physocultopathy and the Peerless College of Chiropractic. He operated in New York in the early 1930s, earning a chance to enjoy the hospitality of Riker's Island.)

A Gestapo officer described as "a small-time Reinhard Heydrich" has been killed in a skirmish between his storm troopers and a Polish guerilla unit. Erich Gutman, the "little butcher of the Gestapo," who staged dozens of executions daily during his career in Poland, was slain by guerillas during a raid on the Lublin district, where Gutman maintained his headquarters. Polish Government in Exile sources indicated that the way for the raid was cleared by Soviet parachutists who landed on the former estate of Count Adam Zamoyski, which had been transformed by the Nazis into a vast concentration camp holding 300 Russian war prisoners. The parachutists cut the wire fence around the camp allowing the prisoners to surge out and overpower their guards. The freed Soviets then disappeared into the woods where they linked up with Polish guerilla squads and mapped out "a widespread campaign to harass the Nazi occupation forces." They were supplied with a "steady stream of arms" dropped by Russian planes by parachute, and "by other channels which cannot be revealed now."

An Allied second front in Europe will be "effectively supplied' by "the unconquered people in the occupied European countries," it was stated yesterday by Office of War Information director Elmer Davis. These people, Davis stated, "want the American people to know that when the time comes to open a second front, it will be effectively supported as a front of liberation."

Allied planes have blasted Japanese headquarters at Linchwan "with satisfactory results," as Chinese forces pursuing retreating Japanese units have occupied four strategic towns between Kiangsi Province. General Joseph W. Stillwell's headquarters, in announcing the Linchwan raid, noted that only two Allied planes failed to safely return to their base, marking the first recorded loss since Brig. Gen. Claire Chennault took command of Allied air activity in China.

Police from the Sheepshead Bay station are searching for a man who, it is claimed, choked his girlfriend and threw her down as they were bidding good-night following a date last night. Seventeen-year-old Patricia Davidson of 2203 Bay Avenue made the complaint this morning, alleging that the young man attacked her and threw her to the floor of her front porch after he brought her home at about 2:40 this morning. Miss Davidson told police she has known the man about three years, and knew of no reason why he might have tried to harm her.

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(Of course, to even become a comptometer operator you must have nerves of steel.)

The Eagle Editorialist gives the back of his hand to Senator James Mead as a possible Democratic candidate for Governor, deploring his refusal to support District Attorney William O'Dwyer in last year's mayoral election, and calling it evidence that Brooklyn Democratic regulars will not support his candidacy. "It should be remembered that Mr. O'Dwyer's friends and supporters are Mr. Bennett's friends and supporters."

Old Timer Will K. Morrow recalls the golden days of 60 years ago, when the jitterbugs of the 1880s favored such steps as the Polka and the Schottische. But, he stresses, the dignified Waltz remained the favorite when Grandma went stepping out. And the perennial John P. Pfalzgraff recalls when the nearest thing to today's comic magazines were the dime novels dealing with Western bad men, and wherever boys gathered you'd find lively discussions of the adventures of Jesse James, the Younger Brothers, and WIld Bill Hickock.

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(Hitting a baserunner in the head with the throw to second to try and keep him from stealing is pretty hard-core baseball. Leo says "why didn't I think of that?")

Negro clubs continue to furnish the strongest opposition this season for the Bushwicks, as the Newark Eagles invade Dexter Park today. The Eagles, operated by business manager Mrs. Effa Manley, who transferred the club from Brooklyn to Newark in 1936, are managed by Willie Wells, "a really clever shortstop," who, with his second-base partner Ray Dandrige make a slick double-play combination. The Eagles recently beat the tough Homestead Grays three times, with a single tie, over a fourt-game stretch, thus upending the race in the Negro National League.

("We otta go see t'em guys," says Joe. "I seen'at Wells a' coupla times, yeeahs ago, makes Reese look like Oinie Lombardi. Why, if he played f't' Dodgehs..." "Yeah," says Sally. "'At'd be sump'n. Him an' Petey woulda made some combination.")

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(Ahhh, Sen. Lodge. Only officer in the Army who got all his gear at Abercrombie & FItch.)

You see mammoth Eugene Pallette in many pictures, but it's nothing to compared to the schedule that kept him busy during the days of the old-time silents. The popular character actor recalls that over the first seven years of his screen career, starting in 1910, he made a new film every ten days. That amounts to 254 different roles, and, after an inauspicious start as a rider in Nestor westerns, most of those roles were leads. But now, in contrast to that feverish routine, the globular star takes leisurely weeks between roles.

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("The only good fake Indian is a...")

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(And Mr. Coolidge then placed the cup back on the shelf. Saved on the cost of dishwater!)

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(Well, look at the bright side. If he's really this dumb, landing on his head won't hurt him a bit.)

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(Nice to see Irwin has a brother who's a better cop than he is. And speaking of Irwin, nice to see this new writer letting Dan burn off years of suppressed hostility.)

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(It's been a while since we've seen Jo go in for a good old-fashioned troll job. Nice to see she hasn't lost the touch.)

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(And I bet Mr. Cole knows the name of every single person who still owes him money.)
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
31,092
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
And in the Daily News...

Daily_News_Sun__Jul_12__1942_.jpg

Of course there's a white bearskin rug.

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Mr. Hill is 55 years old, and has never served in the Army. But you'd never know it.

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Interrogating a possible accessory without identifying yourself? Don't miss a trick, do ya?

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So there we go, Annie has her new home all lined up. And we've seen Gray use "Maw Green" as an outlet for his darker side before, but today's really takes the overcooked cake.

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Poor Willie. Sure, he's a shiftless bum, but sometimes I do feel sorry for him.

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The end of this will be quick and dirty.

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Jack shouldn't worry, he's survived pirhanas.

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What is it with cartoonists and elephants?

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Just what's in those "Awful Awfuls?"

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Sadie says "I *am* pretty spectacular at that!"
 
Messages
15,826
Location
New York City
...

Allied planes have blasted Japanese headquarters at Linchwan "with satisfactory results," as Chinese forces pursuing retreating Japanese units have occupied four strategic towns between Kiangsi Province. General Joseph W. Stillwell's headquarters, in announcing the Linchwan raid, noted that only two Allied planes failed to safely return to their base, marking the first recorded loss since Brig. Gen. Claire Chennault took command of Allied air activity in China.
...

Instead of Dude or Ryan or someone, as we expect, coming to Normandie and Merrily's rescue, Caniff could go with a "ripped from today's headlines" rescue and have the Japanese holding them overrun by the advancing Chinese.


...

You see mammoth Eugene Pallette in many pictures, but it's nothing to compared to the schedule that kept him busy during the days of the old-time silents. The popular character actor recalls that over the first seven years of his screen career, starting in 1910, he made a new film every ten days. That amounts to 254 different roles, and, after an inauspicious start as a rider in Nestor westerns, most of those roles were leads. But now, in contrast to that feverish routine, the globular star takes leisurely weeks between roles.
...

Good thing the silent pictures didn't require him to memorize dialogue.

"'Globular,' really? I'm 5'7", every extra pound shows - have a heart." - EP


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jul_12__1942_(6).jpg



(Well, look at the bright side. If he's really this dumb, landing on his head won't hurt him a bit.)
...

Forget the kid, he's done for, grab the lamp.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sun__Jul_12__1942_(7).jpg


(Nice to see Irwin has a brother who's a better cop than he is. And speaking of Irwin, nice to see this new writer letting Dan burn off years of suppressed hostility.)
...

No kidding, the anti-Irwin tone has been noticeable with the new writer.


And in the Daily News...
Daily_News_Sun__Jul_12__1942_.jpg



Of course there's a white bearskin rug.
...

Atwill deserves his day in court, but my lean is to believe Virginia and Sylvia. I'm only surprised that Errol Flynn hasn't made an appearance in this story yet, but there's still time.


Daily_News_Sun__Jul_12__1942_(2).jpg
...


Interrogating a possible accessory without identifying yourself? Don't miss a trick, do ya?
...

"It's 1942, if you prefer, I could take her downtown and sweat the information out of her in the 'interrogation' room."


...
Daily_News_Sun__Jul_12__1942_(5).jpg


The end of this will be quick and dirty.
...

Today, we rightfully teach soldiers, police, etc., not to blindly follow orders, in part because of the atrocities of WWII, but sometimes following orders is the right thing to do as he's endangering the entire camp by not staying at his post and unwittingly revealing the camp's location to the enemy.


Oh, and...
Daily_News_Sun__Jul_12__1942_(9).jpg


Well, that and laying off the Rheingold.

My grandparents had those in their kitchens as "diet" food.

Jinx pops up an amazing amount of times in the 1940s, especially since she has no echo today.
 

ChiTownScion

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Here's a wild theory: Harold Gray may have "borrowed" the inspiration for spunky and bright Orphan Annie from Lucy Maud Montgomery's Anne Shirley (Anne of Green Gables).

He wouldn't have been the first. Kate Douglas Wiggins' Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm exhibits a lot of parallels with Montgomery's Anne.

Thoughts?
 

LizzieMaine

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Entirely possible, although Annie was originally "Little Orphan Otto" when Gray first pitched the strip. Captain Patterson of the Daily News, who was in charge of the comics for the News-Tribune organization, looked over the examples and said "Put a dress on him," and just like that, Otto became Annie, thus tapping into a long vein of "plucky little girl" characterizations, which certainly included A. of G. G.

There were also direct imitators of Annie herself -- "Little Annie Rooney" and "Little Mary Mixup" both had long runs in syndication, as did "Belinda Blue-Eyes" in Britain, all of them owing much to Harold Gray. None of them, however, approached the baroque weirdness of Gray at his best.
 

LizzieMaine

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The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_.jpg

(Moving Mr. Turkus to the bench might be politically expedient, but is it really a good idea with O'Dwyer in the service to also remove the most aggressive prosecutor in Brooklyn from the position where he's been extremely effective? I'm sure Mr. Anastasia will sleep well tonight.)

President Roosevelt's price control program faces a crucial test in the Senate today. Administration leaders, fearful that limitations on Price Administrator Leon Henderson's authority will be approved, appealed directly to the public for support against proposals now before the Senate Appropriations Commitee to throttle Henderson's power to impose price ceilings on manufactured goods and commodities. On the eve of the battle, Sen. Robert F. Wagner (D-NY) in a radio address warned that "every grasping landlord, every speculator in war materials and consumer goods, every producer reaching out for excessive profits at the nation's expense, is today ganging up on the OPA." Sen. Gerald P. Nye (R-North Dakota), chief architect of the proposed limits on Henderson's authority, predicted that "it won't be long before the price chief has everyone against him. I think there is a general feeling that this price control thing is going to fold up. It is only a question of how much money has to be spent to prove it." The limitations on Henderson's authority are proposed for attachment to the $120,000,000 OPA operating budget for 1943.

Administration leaders hope for swift action this week on the $6,250,000,000 tax bill soon moving to the House floor. The bill will mean an estimated 30,000,000 American wage earners will be liable for income tax payments ranging from a low of $19 per $100 of earnings to a high of $87.50 per $100. Debate on the budget is expected to begin on Thursday, with a final vote expected on Saturday.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(1).jpg

(Why aren't you guys in the Army?)

Surprise blackouts are next on the agenda for New York City's civilian defense training program, Mayor LaGuardia warned yesterday. In his weekly radio broadcast over station WNYC, the Mayor announced that he has received clearance from military authorities to conduct air raid drills without notice. "So everyone be on their guard," warned the Mayor. "We'll have one some evening."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(2).jpg

("An air raid drill?? But I just need one more Messerschmitt for gin!")

The Brooklyn Union Gas Company has been ordered by the Public Service Commission to cancel a rate increase under which the utility company proposed to supply gas to large consumers for auxiliary or alternate use in the event of a shortage of fuel oil. Conditions under which the utility proposed to furnish the service were determined by the Commission to be inequitable, and likely to lead to discrimination between customers. It was also feared that the arrangement proposed by the utility would put at risk the supply of gas provided to regular consumers.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(3).jpg

("What? 'Star and Garter' again? Didn't you already review that show?" "Well, yes, sir, but you see, Bobby Clark is one of the great comic minds of our generation, and his work is worthy of careful analysis. I think that..." "Ethel Barrymore." "What?" "Ethel Barrymore is coming to the Flatbush." "Oh." "Not..." "No. Ethel Barrymore." "Very good sir. But I reviewed her in 1940, and I still think Bobby Clark..." "Send in Cohn, would you, please? And drop this letter in the box on your way out.")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(4).jpg

(Nobody loves Red Skelton but the people.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(5).jpg

("Ten wins in a row!" declares Leo. "Pretty good for an old man!" "Who you callin' old," snarls Mr. French, looming over his manager. "Um, Davis over there, right Grandpa?")

The Bushwicks split a twinbill with the powerful Newark Eagles out at Dexter Park yesterday, but they had to bring in a ringer to do it. Private Mickey Harris of the Boston Red Sox, home in Queens on furlough from duties in the Canal Zone, suited up for Mr. Rosner's boys and tossed the Woodhaven squad to a 10-2 win over the Negro National Leaguers. Harris puzzled the Eagles with a fast-breaking curve ball, striking out seven and issuing only one base on balls. Leon Day led Newark to victory in the nightcap, shutting out the Bushwicks 4-0 on four scattered hits. Day struck out eight and walked none. He had already played a full game in center field for Newark in the opener.

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(6).jpg

("Yes indeed. Back to business. I have found a new investor for our firm -- an army major, he says. Mind you, his uniform seems similar to one I once saw on a theatre usher, but he explained to me that in these days of wartime one must practice careful subterfuge. He described several hair-raising exploits in the Far East that left me...I say, Bungle, are you listening?"

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(7).jpg

("Yes, it's like this. I have this old family house there, a bit run down, and with taxes as they are now, it's become something of a liability. There's no selling market to speak of now, with the war and what not, so it occurs to me that, with your record as a caretaker and all...")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(8).jpg

(Well, at least she put her clothes on first.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(9).jpg

(I was going to note our acrobat friend's giant balloon-like head, but then I realized that our new artist seems to draw everybody that way. Careful you don't float off, boys!)
 

LizzieMaine

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Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_.jpg

And note that the defendant actually brought a gas mask with him to court. You've got to respect his dedication to the bit.

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(1).jpg

"I am TOO the boss of you!"

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(2).jpg

Now we'll see whose kid Merrily really is.

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(4).jpg

The Army needs war dogs too. I'm just saying.

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(5).jpg

"But this dress, on the other hand, is straight out of 1917."

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(6).jpg

You're engaged, Tracy, at least you were the last time we saw Tess. When was that, anyway, 1940?

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(7).jpg

"Oh, the frigid type." MAMA WHAT'S THE MAN MEAN? HUH? WHAT?

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(8).jpg

Andy's about to get the bird.

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(9).jpg

Bit possessive, aren't we there, sir? Let's have a look at your books.

Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(10).jpg
Yep, right there on Page Four.
 
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...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(1).jpg


(Why aren't you guys in the Army?)
...

Because they're conscientious objectors.

Today or tomorrow, I'm expecting a pic of Fay Pace on Page Four.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(3).jpg


("What? 'Star and Garter' again? Didn't you already review that show?" "Well, yes, sir, but you see, Bobby Clark is one of the great comic minds of our generation, and his work is worthy of careful analysis. I think that..." "Ethel Barrymore." "What?" "Ethel Barrymore is coming to the Flatbush." "Oh." "Not..." "No. Ethel Barrymore." "Very good sir. But I reviewed her in 1940, and I still think Bobby Clark..." "Send in Cohn, would you, please? And drop this letter in the box on your way out.")
...

Mary Astor clearly explains why staying on top (in any field) is as hard or harder than getting there.

Neat stuff about the stuntman and the hat. There was more "inside movie-making stuff" out there for the public in 1942 than we often think.


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(6).jpg


("Yes indeed. Back to business. I have found a new investor for our firm -- an army major, he says. Mind you, his uniform seems similar to one I once saw on a theatre usher, but he explained to me that in these days of wartime one must practice careful subterfuge. He described several hair-raising exploits in the Far East that left me...I say, Bungle, are you listening?"
...

"They get excited easily."


...
The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(8).jpg


(Well, at least she put her clothes on first.)
...

Theoretically, she didn't have to put her clothes on, but that could've proved quite embarrassing if she un-invisibled at the wrong time.


...
Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(4).jpg


The Army needs war dogs too. I'm just saying.
...

Press Release
"I'd love to go and fight for my country and I'd enlist today - I'm not scared of dying - but I believe I can do more good for the country as a co-star in one of our nation's most popular comicstrips as it is important to keep the spirits up of everyone at home. It's a sacrifice I'm willing to make." [Sandy will not be taking questions from the Press at this time.]
354075-32377569fc0f2c618ba11c4ec4268395.jpg


"Uh-huh, also, 'co-star,' really?"

"Shut up."


...
Daily_News_Mon__Jul_13__1942_(6).jpg


You're engaged, Tracy, at least you were the last time we saw Tess. When was that, anyway, 1940?
...

"No vows have been exchanged yet, plus I'm what, fifty, one of us needs to know what to do if Tess and I do get married some day."
 

LizzieMaine

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The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_.jpg

(Funny, they don't look Aryan.)

The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, warning that compulsory savings will be needed next year to finance the war, urged that the new, increased tax program begun this year be maintained for the duration. "Except for changes in rated dictated by emergencies," declared Senator Walter F. George (D-Georgia), "this should be the last tax bill we write during this war. We should fix a general tax structure and let it stand." The Senator also suggested that, rather than consider a new tax bill after the first year, it would be better for "the general economy of the country" to let business know that it can count on operating under the wartime tax structure about to be set up. Senator George further stated that his committee expects to give careful consideration to a plan that would allow taxpayers to claim a deduction of from 10 to 20 percent of income on their purchases of War Bonds, which would bear no interest until the end of the war,and which would then be redeemed by the Treasury in four or five equal installments, subject to a capital gains tax of 10 to 15 percent.

Approximately 585,000 motorists in the city have received their basic gasoline ration books today after the close of the three-day registration period. That figure represented a decline of 87,000 from the number of persons who received temporary ration cards when gasoline rationing began in May. It was noted by OPA officials that "nearly all" persons receiving basic A rations, entitling them to 16 gallons a month, also took application blanks for supplemental rations. Those forms must be filled in and mailed to local ration boards for consideration. It was also noted that about 25 percent of forms received back so far are being returned to the applicants because they were not completely filled out with all questions answered.

Kings County looms today as the pivotal factor in the battle for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination between Attorney General John J. Bennett of Brooklyn and Senator James M. Mead of Buffalo, as Democratic National Committee Chairman Edward J. Flynn and Tammany leader Michael J. Kennedy today took the leadership in a fight to stop the Bennett bandwagon. Senator Mead's candidacy has the apparent support of President Roosevelt, and it is seen that the battle over delegates in Mr. Bennett's own district may endanger his candidacy, given the strong popularity and influence of the President in Brooklyn. But a poll of district Democratic leaders revealed today that delegates have been instructed to "back Jack Bennett to the hilt." Given that Mr. Bennett has also received the strong endorsement of State Democratic Chairman James Farley, formerly a member of the President's Cabinet, it is anticipated that the floor battle among delegates at the upcoming State Democratic Convention may prove "one of the bitterest inter-party fights in a decade."


The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(1).jpg

("*Sigh*," sighs Joe. "T'sacrifices I gotta make f't' wawr effet. An' heah we ain' been out steppin' since -- when? Be'foeh t'kid?" "Ehh," shrugs Sally. "T'ey'll be time f'steppin' afteh t' wawr. Stop pullin' Stella's tail, Leonora, ya gonna get scratched." "Onna day t'wawr is oveh," promises Joe, "you an' me's gonna do t'Big Apple right downa middl'a Flatbush Aveneh. Atsa promise." "Big Apooo," nods Leonora, as Stella the Cat takes the cue to skitter under the icebox.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(2).jpg

(Quixote, meet windmill.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(3).jpg

("Clara Lou?")

Wartime restrictions mean that telephone subscribers may not receive new extensions or replace existing equipment except under certain specific conditions. The New York Telephone Company states that these restrictions are imposed by the War Production Board to reserve equipment for official use. Any persons or businesses planning to move or change telephone arrangements must check first with New York Telephone to determine whether there are specific restrictions in effect for the new location. Subscribers may contact the Business Office by dialing 811 from any telephone.

The Fire Department and the Bureau of Weights And Measures are investigating reports of filling station operators dispensing gasoline to favored customers using unapproved containers in an attempt to evade rationing laws. In Flatbush Court, Magistrate Charles Solomon fined 25-year-old Tony Rao, employee of the Marathon Garage of 1205 Coney Island Avenue, $5 for violating city regulations against the unlawful transportation of volatile liquids by dispensing three gallons gasoline from a watering can into the tank of a customer. Police point out that under city ordinance there is a strict one-gallon limit on the amount of gasoline that may be transported in any container.

"A Mother" writes in to say that she hopes her two boys never have to go to war to fight for the likes of "Disgusted Taxpayer," who complained last week to the Eagle about children playing ball in the street. "He should live alone on an island," she declares, "or better still he should go to Europe and observe what the young boys are doing over there. They are not playing baseball in the street."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(4).jpg

("Especially since a year ago you were a Firster!")

The nightclub owner known as the "Number One Fan of the New York Giants" died at his Manhattan home yesterday at the age of 49. Jack White , co-owner of Club 18, at 18 W. 52nd Street, well-known for his colorful, good-natured insults to his patrons, was a permanent fixture at the Polo Grounds, where he occupied either a seat in Section 33 of the upper stand in left field, or a seat in the players' dugout right alongside his favorites. He also accompanied the club to Florida every year for spring training. Mr. White made a habit of posting the score of every Giants win outside his club, but when they lost the sign simply read "No Game Today."

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(6).jpg

(Which reminds me, I wonder how Van Lingle Mungo is doing in Minneapolis?)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(7).jpg

("And that motive is -- REVENGE! BWAHAHAHAHAHA! Sorry, did I say that out loud?")

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(8).jpg

(A quart? Don't you know the advantages of the half-gallon paper carton?)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(9).jpg
(What, can't a guy go to a wedding without getting the third degree? And whoever lays out the Eagle comics page, stop messing with the sequence. If Dunn's not the bottom strip, he's gonna start getting a swelled head. Look, it's starting already.)

The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Tue__Jul_14__1942_(10).jpg

(I'd....kind of like to see that car.)
 

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