The Women of the Robie House (The Arts & Crafts Movement)

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by 16_sparrows, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. 16_sparrows

    16_sparrows Vendor

    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Chicago
    I'm an art historian and I've been doing research on Arts and Crafts architecture in Chicago. In my research I fell upon some interesting personal photos of the family that purchased the Robie house from Mr. Robie after he sold it (after living there for only two years). I'm assuming the father took most of the photos, hence why they wife and children are the subjects of them. Here are a few, which are interesting to see the interior of the house as well as the clothing they are wearing. I have a few more of the children, some quite humorous as they are in costumes. There is also a couple of them in their playroom. Let me know if you are interested in seeing those.

    Robie house was built by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1906-1909, Chicago, IL
    It is near the main campus of the University of Chicago in Oak Park and is privately owned at this point. I don't think they do any tours of the interior, but it is quite easy to see most of the exterior.

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    Jeannette Wilber in the south aisle of the first floor, 1916.
    Is it just me, or is she wearing white spats? I didn't think girls wore spats, especially as late as 1916.


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    Isadora Wilber in the garden, 1916


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    Jeannette Wilber in riding habit at the front gate of the house, 1924. (My, how's she's grown!)
    I am almost sure this gate and the wall has since been torn down. Shame because the gate's design is wonderful.
     
  2. ShooShooBaby

    ShooShooBaby One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,149
    Location:
    portland, oregon
    neat pics! i'd love to see more. it's interesting to see such old-fashioned people in (what i see as) such modern-looking environments. that gate is fantastic!!

    :eek:fftopic: the American Girls "Samantha" doll has two-tone high-button shoes... but that's for 1904. [huh]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. 16_sparrows

    16_sparrows Vendor

    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Chicago
    I'll post some more interiors of the Robie house later, but I fell upon this wonderful writing nook from Purcell and Elmslie who have a similar style to Wright.

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    Writing Nook, Purcell house
    Lake Place, Minneapolis

    How cute is this writing nook! I am going to see if I can reproduce something similar in my office in the new apartment.
     
  4. sweetfrancaise

    sweetfrancaise Practically Family

    Messages:
    568
    Location:
    Southern California
    Wow, wouldn't it be marvelous to have a nook like that? You could create universes in there. Great photos, 16_sparrows, I can't wait for more!
     
  5. Paisley

    Paisley I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,353
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    Thanks for posting this--I love the Arts and Crafts style. I especially like that they would put windows where we'd probably just stick a fluorescent light. :eek:
     
  6. 16_sparrows

    16_sparrows Vendor

    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Chicago
    American Arts and Crafts were on the cusp of electricity being used in domestic housing. Electricity in cities wasn't really utilized until 1905 (sometimes later) and even then it was only for street lamps and for extremely wealthy families. Most of the A&C movement took place during Victorian times, especially the British movement, so gas lamps and such were still widely used. That's why they have such wonderful use of windows. Also, they were trying to move away from the symmetrical looks of houses, so they started placing windows where it was needed, rather than where it would make the house symmetrical. What a concept, huh? :)

    If you are interested in this kind of stuff and how electricity, radio and all that changed the face of America and housing, I would highly suggest Daily Life in the United States, 1920-1940. It is one of my favorite historical books, although my recommendation comes with the warning that the first two chapters are stuffed with boring statistics.
     

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