Typewriters

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by Travis, Jan 14, 2007.

  1. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,108
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I have that EXACT machine, including the case, sitting under my bed, right now!!
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  2. FlapperGirl

    FlapperGirl New in Town

    Messages:
    1
    I have two manual typewriters which I use to write. first I do first draft on my old typewriter and then I transcribe it onto the laptop. I just don't feel it's vintage typing on a laptop when I write about the 20s.
     
  3. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,398
    Location:
    Vienna, Austria
    For my daughter's 16th birthday I got her a vintage 1960s "Erika" brand typewriter from the old East Germany. She loves that thing and, a few years later, took it with her to college.
     
  4. martinsantos

    martinsantos Practically Family

    Messages:
    577
    Location:
    São Paulo, Brazil
    IMG_2099.JPG IMG_2100.JPG Lovely Remington Portable. Late 20s.
     
  5. Klunk

    Klunk New in Town

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Reno Nevada
    872E6E07-AA36-4992-AC26-6B9ECCCA43D1.jpeg
    So here is my Underwood. I don’t know what year it is and I don’t type with it. I do use it to display a copy of my uncle’s WWII letter for winning the Bronze Star on Iwo Jima.
     
  6. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Summerville SC
    Here is my Underwood typewriter. Its part of my 1940s WWII Army Air Forces themed office collection... according to the Underwood Serial Number page this Underwood Model S was manufactured in the last quarter of 1941. Its still works wonderfully. Now I need a proper typewriter desk.
    IMG_8528.JPG
    IMG_8515.jpg
    IMG_8513.jpg
     
  7. David Conwill

    David Conwill Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,839
    Location:
    Bennington, VT 05201
    A dozen years later, I'm still using this. I'm actually 20 pages into a novel I'm writing. I find the actual writing to be much easier using a typewriter versus my laptop. Retyping it into the computer will be the next draft, where I clean up and re-write.

    1955 Smith Corona Silent.jpg

    The only issues thus far are that the felt silencer refuses to stay under the type bars and my ribbon is quite old and starting to go. I can put up with the noise, but I'm going to need a ribbon soon--any recommendations? I didn't see any on my last visit to Staples.
     
    martinsantos likes this.
  8. martinsantos

    martinsantos Practically Family

    Messages:
    577
    Location:
    São Paulo, Brazil
    TAke a look on eBay or any typewriter related store. Maybe you will need to rewind the ribbon into the correct spool - I have to do this with most of my typewriters.

    I have heard very well about www.mytypewriter.com albeit never bought anything from them.

    If impossible or too expensive drop me a line so I can indicate manufacturers here. I buy ribbons by dozens (I don't like when they start getting grayish so I change every 30-40 pages, if a black/red ribbon). They are nylon type and cost around US$1 each. There are for Olivettis, Remingtons from 50s, the Facits and Olympias. But I'm sure you will find really good ones near you. As far as I know is possible to find in USA real silk ribbons!

     
    David Conwill likes this.
  9. David Conwill

    David Conwill Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,839
    Location:
    Bennington, VT 05201
    Thanks, @martinsantos ! I see a few candidates on Amazon and eBay. I just need to make a decision and try one, I guess.
     
    martinsantos likes this.
  10. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The last ribbon I got, for my Royal Model 10, came from mytypewriter. Ten years later, and I'm still using it. I get the feeling these are new ribbons pre-wound onto vintage spools, but you take what you can get these days.

    I learned to type on my mother's Smith-Corona, which aside from a few minor cosmetic notes, is the same as yours. An excellent, durable, easy-to-operate machine.
     
  11. DeeDub

    DeeDub One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    223
    Location:
    Eugene, OR
    I've been buying ribbons from Swartz Ink over in La Grande, OR (https://www.swartzink.com/) and, to wind my own, e.g., on vintage spools that are difficult or expensive to replace, I buy in bulk from Baco Ribbons in Missouri, (314-835-9300 or bacoribbon@sbcglobal.net)
     
    David Conwill likes this.
  12. 1930artdeco

    1930artdeco Practically Family

    Messages:
    588
    Location:
    oakland
    Not sure this has been posted or not but we just watched 'California Typewriter' and really enjoyed it. It is all about a business (California Business Machines) in Berkeley that repairs typewriters. AND...they are still in business. Well, unless this virus kills them off:(. we went looking to see if they were still there and they are and we are thinking about getting one to type up our thank you letters for out wedding.

    Mike
     
    Edward Reed likes this.
  13. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Summerville SC
    very cool
    Very cool! just FYI if you don't already know, if you get a vintage one some don't have the numeral 1 on the number set. you have to use the lower case L ( l ) this was to allow manufacturers to save some space in the overcrowded area where hammers were located. since the lower case l looks like 1 it works. :D
     
  14. 1930artdeco

    1930artdeco Practically Family

    Messages:
    588
    Location:
    oakland
    The wife wants one, probably from the 50's, I have not used one since HS. And that was one of the IBM selectrics, the one with the little ball thing. Always thought that was mechanically spectacular. So starting out on one again will be a relearning curve.

    Here is their website:https://californiatypewriter.wordpress.com/


    Mike
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2020
    Edward Reed likes this.
  15. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The zenith of mechanical typewriter development was the Royal 10, in the mid-1910s. Everything else after that was largely either gimmicky features or cosmetics. Pretty much any post-1920 typewriter will be up to whatever a 21st Century user wants to throw at it -- once you've mastered one such manual machine you've mastered all of them. It's like learning to drive a standard transmission.
     
    Edward Reed likes this.
  16. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,398
    Location:
    Vienna, Austria
    My love of old typewriters —and my smooth sense of style!— can probably be traced back to this man...

     
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