Vintage Car Thread - Discussion and Parts Requests

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by FedoraGent, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

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    Hard to believe 1938 was 77 years ago. Last night I watched a Bob Hope picture from 1941 and it seemed more "real" to me than the crazy things you see on TV today.
     
  2. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I understand - it is weird sometimes to think that most of the actors in these Golden Era classics have passed away. Jimmy Stewart, Margaret Sullivan and Frank Morgan in "The Shop Around the Corner" always seem so alive to me and the story is timeless and fresh - sometimes I am just taken back by how "real" it feels, but it is so old. Not all the movies have that feel. A lot of the film noir's that I love feel very "of the period -" still great movies, but they don't hit me as feeling "today" like others.
     
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Please post back if you learn anything - could be a neat backstory as it is odd that, that car wound up where it did.
     
  4. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    If I find out anything more, I will post it here for sure.
     
  5. buelligan

    buelligan One of the Regulars

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    London, OH
    Big Man, you should look on Hemmings.com to see if there is a Austin motors club or registry. They might be able to point you in the right direction for the information that you are looking for.
     
  6. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    That was a good suggestion. I checked Hemmings and found a link to a club. I've sent them a message requesting information. We'll see what the reply will be.
     
  7. buelligan

    buelligan One of the Regulars

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    Excellent, I hope they can help you out.
     
  8. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    There's a car club you might find useful, try:
    http://www.austinbantamclub.com/cars__values.html
     
  9. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

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  10. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I’ve got a question for the mechanically inclined members here (I know very little about working on old cars, just like to drive them). The arrow in the photo below is pointing to a part that will leak gas about 10 seconds after the car is shut off. The car starts fine and runs fine. No leaking here, even after a drive of well over an hour. No leaking at idle. Only when the motor is shut off, either after just a few seconds of running or an hour or two, will the leak start here (actually just a drip. Not much drips out, but enough to notice. The dripping will last about 30 seconds to one minute (I assume till whatever gas is left in the carburetor drips out).

    Any ideas short of replacing the part? If replacement is needed, can just that part be replaced or will the entire base of the carburetor require replacement?

    Thanks in advance for your help.


    [​IMG]
     
  11. buelligan

    buelligan One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Well it looks like that is the end of the throttle shaft, the shaft that the butterfly is mounted to. I would think that your leak is from something fartherr up in the carb that's not working quite right. Maybe your float is not seating properly and it's causing some excess fuel to flow by. You should be able to get a carb rebuild kit for pretty cheap to clean things up in there. During operation there should only be atomized air flowing past that point and after the engine is shut off there should be no fuel at all in that particular location.
     
  12. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Thanks for the reply. With my limited knowledge of "things mechanical", I didn't think there should be any gas at this point after the motor was shut off. As this problem just started, I guess I should begin my look at the float and/or for a piece of trash keeping things from seating properly.

    I guess I can give that area a look without messing things up too much. :)
     
  13. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,206
    Unfortunately, gas and oil have a tendency to flow a long way from the point of origin. They even mange to flow uphill some times!
     
  14. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    If it's any help, that connector with three holes in it is supposed to be adjustable -- it controls the stroke of the accelerator pump, which is supposed to be adjusted to reflect seasonal weather conditions. The hole on the far left is for hot weather driving, the center hole is for moderate weather, and the right hole is for winter driving. That spring clip comes off and you can move the lever as needed. If you do adjust it, be careful -- the lever simply hangs in a hole on the bottom of the pump and can easily fall out and get lost. Don't ask me how I know this.

    There's a leather seal on the pump plunger that can get worn and deteriorated, and this can cause fuel to leak. Another thing to check.
     
  15. Stearmen

    Stearmen I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,206
    I was wondering if anyone has any Weston Ammeter parts? I am trying to find the screw post that holds the face on. These Harley gauges are really hard to find, they are not even made as replicas any more. [​IMG]
     
  16. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Cobourg
    This is for Big man's carburetor question

    1) When you stop the car there is usually still a little pressure in the fuel pump

    2) There is a needle valve in your carburetor that maintains the correct fuel level

    3) If the needle valve is a bit weak or leaky it will continue to admit fuel to the float bowl after the engine stops

    4) Soon the float bowl will overflow

    5) The gas runs down the carburetor and some leaks out the throttle shaft

    6) Because the throttle shaft is a bit worn too.


    All in all, this is typical of a carburetor that is a bit worn. The cure is to have the carb rebuilt by a specialist. I don't think your carburetor is that far gone yet. I suggest you continue to drive the car but consider having the carb rebuilt next time you get a tuneup.

    Just putting in a carburetor kit that includes a new needle valve will cure it. But if you go that far might as well clean the carb thoroughly and replace gaskets and other parts that wear, and reset all adjustments. In other words rebuild the carb.

    Throttle shaft wear is not a big deal until it becomes bad enough to affect the idle by leaking excess air into the engine when the car is running.

    It can be cured by reaming the bushings oversize and installing an oversize shaft. This is best done by a rebuilder.

    If you want a top quality carb kit or to have your carb rebuilt by a vintage carburetor expert contact this guy. He posts to a lot of vintage car sites and really knows his stuff.

    http://www.thecarburetorshop.com/
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2015
  17. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Winter is officially over. After spending two hours chipping all the ice away from the garage, I got the Plodge out for its first drive of 2015 this afternoon. Thirteen miles around the bend, and all is about as it should be. The mothball smell should disperse around the first of May.

    Got over 3700 miles last year, and hope to best that record this year.
     
  18. Disperse around May!? :eeek: lol lol
     
  19. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    We have wicked big moths here, and after a long winter they get hungry. A man was crossing the street down here last spring wearing a wool overcoat and before he got to the other side, all he had left was a handful of buttons.

    Meanwhile, owners of 1937-41 Chrysler products who've struggled with the infamous unobtainable master cylinder will be happy to know this part, no. 858889, is now being reproduced and is available via ebay from Vintage Mopar Direct and will probably be available from Bernbaum, Roberts, and other vendors soon. It's selling for $199, which is a lot less than originals were going for when I was looking for a replacement a couple years ago. I can't vouch for the quality, except to say that I've used and been satisfied with the wheel cylinders I've gotten from this source.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2015
  20. A handful of buttons! :rofl:
     

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