Vintage Car Thread - Discussion and Parts Requests

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by FedoraGent, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    New Forest
    You can see from my avatar that my MG is a Y-Type. First mooted in 1937, it was to be the baby of the SVW range. Prototypes were built and road tested, the model was planned to be exhibited at the 1939 Motor Show. But with the onset of war, like so many other factories in the UK, MG went over to war production, mothballing all of their car production/parts/drawings/admin and so on. At the end of hostilities car production resumed, but not until 1947 due to both bomb damage and a serious fire.

    The two cars that were produced was the sports TC and the Y-Type. As with other models MG produced an open top Y-Type which they called the YT. T meaning tourer, a fancy way of describing open top "touring." In 1952 MG Car Company updated the “Y” Type and an improved model was launched, known as the “YB”. The “YB” had a completely new Lockheed braking system and a much more modern type of back axle. The road holding was also improved by the introduction of 15 inch wheels; the “Y” and the “Y/T” had 16 inch wheels. The “YB” also had an anti-roll bar fitted to the front of the car and better dampers were fitted. So good did these improvements prove to be that MG used them in other models including the MGB, production of that car didn't cease until 1980.

    In January 1950, the MG TC gave way to the MG TD. A much improved car, it combined the TC's drivetrain, a modified hypoid-geared rear axle, the MG Y-type chassis, a familiar T-type style body and independent suspension on front axle using coil springs from the MG Y-type saloon: a 1950 road-test report described as "most striking" the resulting "transformation ... in the comfort of riding" It was the TD that I hankered after when I was a penniless student. The TD, unlike it's forbears, didn't come with spoke wheels as standard, although you could order them as an optional extra. There's something about chromium wire wheels, here's a couple of TD's with and without the spokes.
    MG TD1.jpg mg td.jpg
     
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  2. Babydoll

    Babydoll Call Me a Cab

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    Lily and I were out running errands today, and we stopped at a red light behind this beauty. Less than 2 blocks later something went thunka-thunka-thunka, and he hastily pulled over, blocking traffic in the bicycle lane. Awful way to spend a sunny afternoon.
    IMG_20180318_172757.jpg
     
  3. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    That's a '41 Buick.
     
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  4. Talbot

    Talbot One Too Many

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    It's beautiful. It looks Buick but the trunk handle is different as are the rear fender trims.
     
  5. 1955mercury

    1955mercury One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    172
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Possibly 1941 Cadillac?
    1941Cadillac.jpg
     
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  6. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,735
    Location:
    New York City
    Pretty lines and not too fancy looking as some Cadillacs from that time period could be. For my money, the car could lose the three chrome fender-trim pieces and it would look cleaner.
     
  7. I like those! Makes it look fast just standing still. I'm probably biased as this was my Dad's favorite year Cadillac. We had a dozen carcasses in the field (what was left after he sold the nice ones).
     
  8. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    12,735
    Location:
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    After your post ⇧, I went and looked at the car more carefully on line and will gladly admit that the chrome strips look better in the full image than I thought they did in the from-the-trunk shot. They are pretty simple and clean and, you are right, they give a feeling of speed.
    This ⇩ looks pretty darn nice.

    510861-1000-0.jpg

    Edit Add: You can feel the Raymond Loewy and Henry Dreyfus influence in those chrome strips (I'm sure they weren't involved, but their style vibe was influencing many thing they didn't directly touch).
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
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  9. Benzadmiral

    Benzadmiral Call Me a Cab

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    I liked the pre-WWII cars because I had built and customized plastic models of them, from companies like AMT and Revell and Monogram. The early to mid-'60s cars I loved because they were new and of the moment, because heroes and villains on TV drove them, and because I'd built models of them too.
     
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  10. Studebaker Driver

    Studebaker Driver One of the Regulars

    20150214_092345_resized_1.jpg Fading Fast, when you stop by on your California tour, after you're fed we can go wine tasting. There are about 100 local wineries around here. This was a winetasting trip.
     
  11. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI
    Went out and test drove a Maxwell Model 25 today. I was definitely unimpressed. A "frame off restoration" with body sills so poor that the rear doors opened on bumps, a transmission which had to be forcibly jerked into gear, and an engine with an distinct rod knock. The machine had great steering and excellent brakes for its day, but overall it was not as driveable as a good Model T.
     
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  12. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Pre-war cars had the benefit of running on fossil fuel that would last forever, just like smoking never killed you. Without the worry of fuel efficient, wind tunnel design, manufacturer's R&D departments had ever more artistic flare, none more so than Duesenberg Motors. However, if you live in a country where they drive on the left and you don't have a Hollwood 'A' Lister income, then you are unlikely to ever realise the dream of owning a Doozy. But there are alternatives:
    MG SA Tickford.jpg MG SA Tickford 3.jpg MG SA Tickford 1.jpg MG SA Tickford 2.jpg
     
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  13. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    On the other hand, there were a few forward-thinking people in the industry who understood that for some, fuel efficiency and low operating costs were real selling points. The Willys Americar was perhaps the first American car to be designed from the ground up as an "economy car," and it received consistently high ratings for overall quality and value from the scientific testing department at Consumers Union Reports.

    [​IMG]

    The Americar consistently delivered 25 or more miles per gallon, which was phenomenal mileage for the period, and while they were never big sellers, they became very popular used cars during the war, when an A card usually got you three gallons a week. They are hard to come by today because most of them were molested by postwar hot-rodders.
     
  14. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Acknowledging that the line of overthink is nearby (and probably behind me), but also recognizing that it's a game we play here at FL from time to time, don't its headlights and grill seem to be putting on a humble almost puzzled, but also demure or diffident, look as if to say, "hey, I'm not trying to be a wow car, just a good, decent work-a-day vehicle for you?"
     
  15. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    "I YAM WHAT I WHAT I YAM AND THAT'S ALL THAT I YAM."

    If Ralph Nader were twenty years older, he'd have driven a Willys Americar.
     
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  16. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,038
    Location:
    New Forest
    Before Alec Issigonis came up with the iconic Mini, he designed The Morris Minor, a car that certainly looks like it shares it's DNA from the Americar, or have I had too much red wine?
    Morris_Minor_MM (1).jpg
     
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  17. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,131
    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI
    They are cute cars indeed. Looks like The inspiration for "Susie".

     
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  18. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Well, there were major gasoline shortages in the United States between 1916 and 1925. Fractional distillation, simply yielded too little gasoline and too much kerosene to meet the demands of the Motor Age. By 1915 and 1916 most refiners were adding increasing amounts of kerosene to their motor fuel, leading auto manufactures to lower compression ratios, and hence power.

    In the early 1920s, the discovery of new oil fields in Oklahoma, and the introduction of fluid catalytic cracking, which tremendously increased gasoline yields, ended that first "gas crisis".
     
  19. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,772
    Location:
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    There is more to the Willys Americar story both before and after. The Americar was the work of Delmar G. "Barney" Roos, a hot shot engineer who worked for many American car companies and had the task of coming up with a new car for Willys.

    They couldn't afford a new engine so he was forced to use a 4 cylinder job that dated back to the Willys Overland Whippet, which debuted in 1927. The engine was not only obsolete and low on power but had a poor reputation for reliability.

    Roos revised the design completely, nearly doubling the horsepower, and improved engine life from 4 hours at full power and full throttle, to 150 hours.

    The new Willys was a good looking economical car and was quite popular. They advertised 30 miles per gallon. This car saved the Willys company from bankruptcy.

    Good thing too, because this engine was used in millions of Jeeps from WW2 on, the basic design of which came from the Willys company.

    After the war it continued to be used in Jeeps and also a small economy car called the Henry J.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2018
  20. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Ralph Nader doesn't have a driver's license and doesn't know how to drive a car. Ironic isn't it? Not that not knowing what he is talking about ever stopped him.
     

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