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Vintage Coffee Makers

scottyrocks

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,070
Location
Isle of Langerhan, NY
for those that have issues with bitterness....use the starbucks trick...shake a little salt onto the grounds before you run them...it cuts the bitterness way down...i didn't think there would be a difference when my wife tried it but the difference is noticable...

This doesnt result in salty coffee (whatever that tastes like)?

My parents have one of those big chrome 1950s-60s era bubble-top electric percolators. I remember it only came out when company was present. As a kid I never drank coffee but the smell of coffee being made in that percolator was heavenly (and maybe not even Chock Fulla Nuts-n-Bolts).

In the 60s I seem to remember my mom using Maxwell House or Savarin.

Ive been using drip makers for years now, and Im glad to know that I havent been burning my coffee during the brewing process. Ive also been told to run a vinegar and water solution through a drip coffee machine every so often to keep it clean. Any validity to this?

It seems, after reading through this thread, that are way more ways to make coffee than I ever suspected. Right now, my favorites are (dont shoot me) Eight O'Clock, IHOP, and Dunkin Donuts. Starbucks is feh!-in-a-cup, afaic.

I like what I like based on what Ive experienced. Im sure theres better, as Ive heard of mail-order clubs something like coffees-from-around-the-world.
 

Jish1969

Familiar Face
Messages
95
Location
Buffalo, NY
I bought the new percolator from Target with Christmas money because I am expanding my camping gear, but I found this Moka pot yesterday at the Salvation Army for $1.99 and I couldn't pass it up...I haven't tried either one of them yet but I am very excited about using the Moka pot! The design dates to 1933 and hasn't changed since so it is difficult to date it, but the handle appears to be bakelite. I have an old aluminum drip opt too but it is at my father's house. He laughed when I brought it home, but when the power goes out he uses it.
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Messages
11,580
Location
Covina, Califonia 91722
The Moka pot is an iconic design, I think that it is a classic.

I bought the new percolator from Target with Christmas money because I am expanding my camping gear, but I found this Moka pot yesterday at the Salvation Army for $1.99 and I couldn't pass it up...I haven't tried either one of them yet but I am very excited about using the Moka pot! The design dates to 1933 and hasn't changed since so it is difficult to date it, but the handle appears to be bakelite. I have an old aluminum drip opt too but it is at my father's house. He laughed when I brought it home, but when the power goes out he uses it.
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SGT Rocket

Practically Family
Messages
600
Location
Twin Cities, Minn
Percolator, coffee maker

Hi All,

Tonight my old coffee pot whent kaput. Not sure what was up with it, but it leaked everywhere. So off to the trash it went. :(

This got me to thinking. When I was growing up, my parents and everyone else I knew had the percolator style of coffee pot. As a kid, I remember waking up to a home full of the smell of wonderful coffee. I remember the sound of it percolating too. What memories. :)

So I thought to myself "I think I'll go online and try to find a good percolator." Well, to my surprise and astonishment, I found quite a few. But, it was very, very hard to figure out what was of good quality and what wasn't. For the same percolator, some people thought it was really great, while others thought it was a horrible device and broke after 10 or 15 pots of coffee.

Could anyone recommend a good percolator to me? I'm thinking of something around 10 or 12 cups and stainless steel.

Thanks!
SGT Rocket
 
Messages
10,879
Location
Portage, Wis.
My recommendation to you is to scour the thrift shops. I've got a couple I picked up for less than five bucks. I use a model, I believe is from the sixties, currently. I brew a pot for work every day. Like they say, they don't build 'em like they used to!
 

lframe

One of the Regulars
Messages
171
Location
Charlotte, NC
I have both. My Grandmother only uses a percolator. I'm surprised I don't have hair on my chest from the coffee my great-uncle made in his. I also agree with Tom. I found mine at Goodwill for just a few dollars.
 

1961MJS

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,347
Location
Norman Oklahoma
Hi

When my parent's percolator bit the dust about ten years ago, I bought them two replacements from Cabelas. The first one is still going strong.

Later
 

ThemThereEyes

One of the Regulars
Messages
246
Location
Arkham
I've been looking at the one by Cuisinart, seems to have good reviews. Unless, of course, you can find one in thrift. I'm going to try that first, myself. If I can't find anything, I may get the Cuisinart one.
 

SGT Rocket

Practically Family
Messages
600
Location
Twin Cities, Minn
I'm not sure what the best grind would be. It seems like when drip coffee makers just came out, they had coffee that was ground specifically for them. But, when I look at the regular coffee in places like Target, there are no specifics as to what type of coffee maker they are to be used in.

I ended up getting the Presto 02811 percolator. I really like it. It's not nearly as heavy or sturdy as the percolators I grew up with, but it will do. It seems like the old percolators were so solid and heavy, you could club a thief with it and nearly kill him.

I am liking the Presto though.
 

Mr. 'H'

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,110
Location
Dublin, Ireland, Ireland
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Mmm. Just brewed a good cup of joe in my "new" 1948 Bulpitt & Sons Swan brand electric coffee percolator. I've been searching for a coffee percolator for ever, so it's great having a 40s one now!

Really "moderne."

Also, check the 1920s Jackson China diner mug.
 

Stanley Doble

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,808
Location
Cobourg
For a percolator you use coffee ground coarser than for a drip maker.

Does anyone remember the coffee maker with a glass pot and a funnel on top? The water in the pot boils and steam pressure forces the boiling water up into the funnel where it brews the coffee, when you take it off the heat the hot coffee goes down into the pot. Every diner used to have them.
 

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