What Are You Reading

Discussion in 'The Reading Room' started by Lancealot, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Butcher shop errand sale bargaining and tin can collecting bequeathed a precocious savvy; and the last library trip,
    and the final window scene look at the little girl reading really hit hard. :coffee:
     
  2. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    HH, reading the last Wolfe section you posted reminded me of several Edward Hopper paintings such as this one:

    [​IMG][/URL]
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Just started "Lusitania, Triumph, Tragedy and the End of the Edwardian Age" by Greg King and Penny Wilson. It was recommended to me by a friend who runs a book bundling website (suggesting combination of books to read together). I'm only a few chapters in, but it is quite a contrast to "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" which I'm still working my way through as both take place at the same time, but those traveling in first and second class on the Lusitania live a financial world apart from Francie in Brooklyn.
     
  4. Sefton

    Sefton Call Me a Cab

    Not very "Golden Era" but I'm reading "The Way of Zen" by the late great Alan Watts. Although I suppose you could say it's about a golden eraćƒ¼it just happened more than 2000 years before Brooks Brothers :D

    Alan Watts was actually quite the sartorialist. If you look at early pictures of him (say 1940s/1950s) he is wearing nicely tailored suits usually with a neat Bowtie. He wrote an interesting essay on the importance of dress and wasn't at all a fan of the look of the hippies who were his core readers in the 60s/70s. Later in life he adopted the dress of traditional Japan by always wearing a man's kimono. I think he looked quite good in it although not being author/lecturer/philosopher I don't think I could pull off that look myself.

    Back to the book: it is clear and easy to read (which is saying a lot for a book about Zen) and I recommend it if you have even a slight interest in those sorts of things.
     
  5. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,745
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US

    William Johnston's modern interpretation of the 14th Century product The Mysticism of The Cloud of Unknowing is a good read that attempts through a preface penned by Thomas Merton and an introductory bow to Zen to dovetail East and West. Worth a look.
     
  6. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The Sams Photofact folder for my recently-dismantled Zenith Trans-Oceanic radio. Mr. Sams has chosen to use chassis photos which don't match the schematic, which doesn't especially help. But I think I can figure out what's going on.
     
  7. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    My money is on you, but man is that sloppy or outright inconsiderate of the company.
     
  8. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    It's a common issue with Photofacts -- they'd use an early-production model for their photos, but if there were changes mid-run, they might change the schematic but not the pictures. Or they might change the pictures and not the schematic. I had to buy three different folders before I found one that properly matched my TV set. But at any rate, I managed to get the radio reassembled without electrocuting myself.
     
  9. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I had no doubt who was going to win in you versus the radio.
     
  10. Great...... That explains the problems I have had with photofact then. :p
     
  11. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Margaret Cavendish, Preface to Orations of Divers Sorts and The Convent of Pleasure

    A lovely and fascinating 17th century lady philosopher. :)
     
  12. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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  13. Nobert

    Nobert Practically Family

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    Where I'm Calling From, the first time I've read Raymond Carver in over 20 years. An interesting perspective now that I'm old enough to have gotten drunk, smoke cigarettes and go through horrible, toxic breakups.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2015
  14. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

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    Andrew Hodges' Alan Turing: The Enigma offers a rare glimpse inside the Allied code break effort.:coffee:
     
  15. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    Thank you, that's already on the list.
     
  16. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Just finished "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" and saw that TCM was playing it yesterday, so I recorded it will see how Hollywood handled this very impressive book.
     
  17. HadleyH

    HadleyH I'll Lock Up

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    My tablet ...is getting in the way of the Romanovs .... :(
     
  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Thomas Wolfe had some thoughts on Brooklyn too. "Only The Dead Know Brooklyn."
     
  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I love Brooklyn's history and culture - the good, the bad, all of it is fantastically interesting. The shadow of Manhattan looms large, but doesn't own Brooklyn - it's always been muscular enough to do its own thing. But, like my father, something will never feel right without the Dodgers there (and I was too young to remember, I've just read enough to "feel" the loss).

    And I'm saving "A Tree Grows..." for Saturday night viewing fun.
     

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