What Hat Are You Working On Today?

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Hat and Rehat, Apr 14, 2020.

  1. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Denver
    I don't believe I've seen a thread like this one before. It seems appropriate now though, when a lot of Loungers have time on their hands.
    In my case today isn't accurate but I didn't think a thread titled "what hat were you working on yesterday" made sense.
    My hat work has been on hold for a long time but late Easter evening I decided to get back to two projects I had benched a while back. Both are pretty damaged specimens, a 3X Open Road that I reblocked from 7 3/8 to 7 1/2 to fit a drummed 7 3/8 sweat into and a Bradmore that I blocked down from 6 7/8 to 6 1/2 to install a drummed 6 3/8 sweat into for a hat for my grandson. Both hats had holes and were featured in another thread about felt mending. I made my own flanges for them but still need to get band blocks squared away prior to flanging. To avoid dust in the house that's an outside job so I decided to make sweatbands last Sunday.
    My needle bar needs readjusting on the sewing machine, so I decided to do it by hand. I have one complete, for the Stetson. I figured out how to do the locking stitch done by a serging machine that reeded sweats have. As you can see, the early part didn't look very clean or straight, but I got better as I went along. A nice thing about the locking stitch is that if you get a knot in your thread, or run out, you can just cut the thread then 20200412_161158.jpg 20200412_235737.jpg 20200412_235749.jpg 20200412_235804.jpg 20200412_235810.jpg back up three stitches, stitch over them and keep going.
     
  2. FedoraRedHat

    FedoraRedHat New in Town

    Messages:
    35
    I don't know if this qualifies as actual hat work, but I recently purchased a liner set for my two panama hats. Thanks to @deadlyhandsome for the recommendation. Here are the finished products:

    Montecristi Havana:

    [​IMG]

    Stetson Aficionado:

    [​IMG]

    I used Scotch Double-Sided mounting tape under the sweatband, since I am hesitant to use hot glue on a Montecristi. It holds very well, unless you need to remount it. Surprisingly, my Akubra Stylemaster liners are glued on as well. I would have thought that they sewed them in.
     
  3. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    I would appreciate if you would run through how you 'bell' a leather sweat. I have been buying them already sized and sewn and would like to save a few bucks and size my own. Do you use a ferrule to join the reed? How do you cut the sweat to bell it?
     
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  4. Frunobulax

    Frunobulax

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    15,426
    Location:
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    I've learned two ways of belling a sweat. The first is to cut the sweat to length, then cut the ends at about a five degree angle so when you join the sweat at the reed, it forms a "V." Then bring the leather together and join them with tape, and zigzag stitch if you want.

    The other is to cut sweat to length and cut the reed just a bit too long. Insert the ends of the reed into the sweat and throw a couple of stitches in it to to hold it. This causes the leather band to bell when it is joined, similarly to the method above.
     
  5. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    and you don't bother with the ferrule?
     
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  6. Frunobulax

    Frunobulax

    Messages:
    15,426
    Location:
    Funkytown, USA
    Oops, sorry. Still use the ferrule.
     
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  7. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

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    5,555
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    An easy way is to take the old sweat that you're replacing and use it as a pattern for the new sweat. Of course, you'll have to cut the stitches and the reed that join the old sweat together and then lay it over top of the new one for your pattern. Make your marks and then cut it. As far as cutting the reed, I usually cut mine at 11/16 longer than the sweat. It gives a nice bell shape to where the sweat will sit nicely on top of the opening of the hat rather than sinking down inside of it...and yes. A ferrule to join the reed
     
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  8. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,599
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Yes, I am learning the art of hand sewing in the sweats. Getting it to sit on top but not too proud I am learning can be tricky. ….and getting it to uniform around the entire circumference. I have it down to 30 mins to baste and then another hour to sew but damn I am a slow sewer. But then I have a ton of time on my hands so there is no rush.
     
  9. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,555
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    Nothing wrong with slow and calculated, BB. It's better to take it slow and to do it right than it is to rush through it and slop it up. But, your speed will pick up after you do a few, and it'll be done right because you took your time with it in the beginning.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2020
    deadlyhandsome likes this.
  10. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,441
    Location:
    Denver
    I guess I'll add my details. Like Jim I cut the sweat leather to measured length, though I angle cut the ends a bit more dramatically, as much as 12 degrees on thin, soft leather (remember, I'm also making some myself). I cut one end of the reed flush and eyeball 1/2"- 9/16" extra on the other end. I start my back stitch at the top, a few stitches down I install the febrile, stretching the leather to do it. I put one temporary stitch there, then stitch down to it, adding my bow last. I get a pronounced bell that starts a little snug but soon stretches and relaxes.
    In Scientific Hat Finishing and Renovating Ermatinger talks about belling a sweat as a modification. I get the impression belling was not universal practice at the time. He suggests a hatter could get work from local retailers sizing bigger hats down when they were low on stock in a smaller size. I waa surprised, but he says cut 3/8" off of each end of the leather to reduce a hat one size. He doesn't discuss a reed or ferule there, but does acknowledge them elsewhere. Maybe he leaves the reed as is, stretching only that 3/4" out of the leather. It seems a little tricky but would allow the reed to still rest on the brink break.
     
    steur and belfastboy like this.

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