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What is your favorite aircraft of all time?

Tiki Tom

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,241
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
Had the good fortune to stumble across this in a field in upstate New York. A Curtiss C-46 Commando. About 3,500 were built during WWII, but it could never keep up with the DC-3/ C-47 Dakota because the Commando was “a maintenance nightmare.”

Still, it was a little bit haunting to see this baby sitting in a field by the side of the road.

684378CA-F8C2-4581-935D-A13A95AAD147.jpeg 0F53632E-B5EA-4F83-8208-F1F0F669D91E.jpeg
 
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GHT

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,508
Location
New Forest
sopwith_f-1_camel.jpg
The Sopwith Camel is a British WW1 biplane fighter aircraft that was introduced in 1917. It was developed by the Sopwith Aviation Company and became one of the best known fighter aircraft of the Great War.

The Camel was powered by a single rotary engine and was armed with twin synchronised Vickers machine guns. It was highly manoeuvrable in the hands of an experienced pilot. Camel pilots have been credited with downing 1,294 enemy aircraft, more than any other Allied fighter of the conflict.
 

dirigoboy

New in Town
Messages
16
I will have to confess to two things, the first being that I know little of airplanes of The world wars, and the second thing, is that what I do know, is based on bias.
Back during my high school days, I had a biology teacher who strode in to school each day in his tweed coat with a great deal of vigor. He was a family friend of ours as well, a Marine Corps fighter pilot, and during both WWII and Korea, he flew the Corsair which he absolutely loved
Vought_F4U_Corsair_(USMC).jpg


In memory of pilot John Gillespie Magee

High Flight

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
of sun-split clouds,—and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of—wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov’ring there,
I’ve chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air. . . .

Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
I’ve topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
Where never lark nor ever eagle flew—
And, while with silent lifting mind I’ve trod
The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
 
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Peacoat

*
Bartender
Messages
6,353
Location
South of Nashville
I will have to confess to two things, the first being that I know little of airplanes of The world wars, and the second thing, is that what I do know, is based on bias.
Back during my high school days, I had a biology teacher who strode in to school each day in his tweed coat with a great deal of vigor. He was a family friend of ours as well, a Marine Corps fighter pilot, and during both WWII and Korea, he flew the Corsair which he absolutely loved
View attachment 548422

In memory of pilot John Gillespie Magee
I have always liked the Corsair as well.
 

Tiki Tom

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,241
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
I will have to confess to two things, the first being that I know little of airplanes of The world wars, and the second thing, is that what I do know, is based on bias.
Back during my high school days, I had a biology teacher who strode in to school each day in his tweed coat with a great deal of vigor. He was a family friend of ours as well, a Marine Corps fighter pilot, and during both WWII and Korea, he flew the Corsair which he absolutely loved
View attachment 548422

In memory of pilot John Gillespie Magee

High Flight

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
of sun-split clouds,—and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of—wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov’ring there,
I’ve chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air. . . .

Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
I’ve topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
Where never lark nor ever eagle flew—
And, while with silent lifting mind I’ve trod
The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.

My wife’s father was a Marine Corps Corsair pilot in the Pacific during WWII. Regrettably, he didn’t talk about it much, so —despite internet searches— I know little about the specifics.
 

Tiki Tom

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,241
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
This is from an old junior high newsletter of the mother of a friend of mine. It is from the year 1942. See the article titled “Attention Boys”. It asks for the youngsters to donate the model aircraft they are building to the Air Raid Wardens so that they can be used in demonstrations. It then lists the boys who have donated models and which planes they made.

I have never heard this tidbit of history before. I relate to it, as I was an avid aircraft modeler when I was a kid.

05E1D15B-3CA6-43BD-9A93-FD0D6527137D.jpeg
 

Altiori

One of the Regulars
Messages
110
Location
Savannah, GA
B-17

The Eighth Air Force suffered more than 47,000 casualties in World War II, including over 26,000 deaths and 28,000 prisoners of war, which was half of the U.S. Army Air Forces' total casualties. This was more than the entire United States Marine Corps.

The “Mighty Eighth” was created in Savannah. Two blocks from where I live. It is now an American Legion.

This is the plaque. (First photo)

And the plane “The Sentimental Journey” that did several flyovers of Savannah over the weekend. (Second photo)

(Flew over our house; the sound of the engines was stunning)

“Despite Memorial Day’s origins as a time to honor fallen Civil War soldiers, it has largely become an unofficial kickoff to the summer season. What barbeque lovers and beach trippers might not know, however, is that the holiday also comes with a law requiring a National Moment of Remembrance. This solemn reminder was said to be inspired by a group of children. While touring Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C., in 1996, the children were asked what Memorial Day meant to them. Their answer ? “The day the pools open!” The National Moment of Remembrance law was passed in 2000, and encourages all Americans to pause for one minute at 3 p.m. local time to think about the sacrifices of fallen military personnel.”

—from History Facts

Maybe say a prayer or think good thoughts in honor of our fellow men and women who died in service to our country.

Freedom isn’t free.

Wishing you all a peaceful day.
 

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