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Ok, so some things in the golden era were not too cool...

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by Blackjack, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. [video=youtube;qvHUxgpPcEo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=qvHUxgpPcEo[/video]
  2. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Wow, that makes this child's play look harmless.......

  3. Atterbury Dodd

    Atterbury Dodd One Too Many

    I would have to agree there Blackjack. That's creepy!
  4. Mr. Hallack

    Mr. Hallack One of the Regulars

    My biggest problem is the racisim during that time, especially with the interment of Japanese-Americans during the war.
  5. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Wow, I have never heard that and I've known some who were in the internment camps.
  6. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Yeah, and the homophobia, xenophobia, petty Nationalism, poor healthcare (especially in the filed of mental health), general prejudice against anything different.... "golden" era my hind quarters. Not to say we've moved on anywhere near as much as we should have hoped, but hey.... Personally, I like living in an era when those who wish to promote such prejudices are made uncomfortable. [huh]
  7. Depends on where you live and where you look. From where I sit, all those things are as common now as they ever were -- they might be disguised a bit in "polite society," but five minutes on the internet will show you the very offscouring of humanity in all its glory. Read the comments section on any news site for the proof.

    Racism et. al., nowadays is like cockroaches under the refrigerator. You might not see them right off, but they're there. When we pretend they aren't there, we're deluding no one but ourselves.
  8. Actually., I was just referring to that video of the guy with the baby but I would agree wholeheartedly with Lizzie, a lot of the so called prejudices depends on what end of the table your eating at. Not to say they don't exist but they're certainly not one sided and that as they say is the nature of the beast.
  9. I agree with you, Lizzie. I would actually go as far to say that there is more prejudice today than there was then.

  10. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    I look back fondly on a time when you could walk nearly anywhere safely even in major cities at night and leave your car unlocked without worrying.
  11. Well, as a whole cities are much less violent today than they were in the years before the Great War. The mayhem in a town such as New York would set your teeth on edge, I think. Motor car theft was a terrible problem in the 1920's. Ever heard of the term "joy ride"?
  12. Clearly you do not know Chicago very well...
  13. Has Chicago two or three murders a night? do the make an industry of dosing drinks with Chloral Hydrate, then black-jacking the unfortunate drunk, rolling him, and leaning him in the gutter?

    New York and Chicago were sinks of vice at the turnof the last century the likes of which we in the First World have not seen in our lifetimes. Of course tis crime and vice was pretty strictly class segregated. No one noted the death of an unidentified traveler, or of a denizen of the underworld. An attack on a member of the Middle Class was news then as it is today. the Middle Class was simply smaller in those days.

    Try Herbert Ashbury's excellent book "The Gangs of New York"' a chronicle of a century of vice , crime and corruption in our great port city for some ales hat will URL your hair.
  14. There are several "big" things we could all see wrong- changing morals, manners, hygiene etc. But really now. In what millennium could baby juggling at height be considered entertainment? All that's need to make it worse would be ... baby juggling over an alligator pit.
  15. Jack@$$ meets Boardwalk Empire :p
  16. Deco-Doll-1928

    Deco-Doll-1928 Practically Family

    Good grief! There sure were a lot of people during that time doing crazy stunts like this, huh? lol


    My comment on this thread is that it's really sad how much time has changed, but things like racism never go away (although in some respects, some things have gotten better). It's things like this that I don't like about the Golden Era (or any past era). However, I think the most important thing to remember is what we today can learn from peoples mistakes from the past so we hopefully don't make the same mistake they did.
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  17. Yes. The shootings and crimes that get reported on the news are few and far between. The police don't even answer a lot of the calls, yes it's THAT bad. If you are white, you can not walk through the south side at night. My wife worked down there and was told by the police, if your driving through this area and you accidentally hit someone you don't stop to help, drive to a police station and report it. In the 30's my mother took the train by herself downtown and walked to the Aragon every weekend, no one bothered you. When it was hot people slept down by the lake, no one bothered you. It is a LOT worse today, there are shootings, rapes, assaults, robberies constantly in the city, it is BAD. I've lived there, I know what Im talking about.
  18. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    I agree with Edward. Even if people are still stupid as hell today some things really have changed to the better. If you don't want to see it just because you love your nostalgia so much...well okay. I don't even care to get into this discussions anymore because I already know the opinions won't change a bit.

    For Jackass take this:

    I quite enjoyed the clip.^^
  19. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Oh sure, it's still there, though imo it's something of an advance that if not wiped out entirely, it can't be as explicit as once it was. Just bugs me when people (typically from ethnicities and social groups who've never had to face these forms of prejudice) fetishise a time in the past as some sort of perfect period when, in reality, it wasn't a whole heap better than today. There's a lot of folks would get a very rude awakening if they ever did get plunked down in the middle of the era and had to survive its mores.
  20. Thats funny Edward that you would say that yet be here. My folks and all their friends were the WWII generation and all of them, ALL of them say the same thing, that even with the war and growing up in the depression they were glad they were born when they were because life was better then. How do you explain that? There were more freedoms, less government control, less taxes, one person could work and women (if they chose to) could stay home and raise a family. Families ate together, played together, prayed together. Life was simpler, I'd go in a second.

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