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Safari Express rifle pic thread

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by DUKE NUKEM, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. Yup! Me too Sarge!
     
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  2. BlueTrain

    BlueTrain One Too Many

    I can handle a map and compass just fine. It's the electronic stuff that is over my head. But somehow things like mountain climbing and other sports seem almost artificial, like something George Plimpton would have done, although he never did things like that. For a real adventure, one could simply join the armed forces (George Plimpton did and was a tanker). For pure adventure, the Coast Guard probably offers the best chance. Of course, in the armed forces, you're doing whatever you're ordered to do and that might take the edge off the adventure part. Besides, you might get killed. So I guess your best bet is to go deer hunting during bow season.

    The funny thing is, people have been saying for at least the last hundred years that everything has been conquered, everything has been discovered, everything has been done. All the excitement has gone out of life. Maybe nobody told Sasha Siemel that.
     
  3. I had supper one evening with Mr. Plimpton. At a banquet. About 1978 or 79. I hadnt a clue who he was so we didn't speak much. Other than pleasantries.

    I think he appreciated it.
     
  4. SurfGent

    SurfGent Suspended

    853
    I've been fairly confident in wilderness terrain. Of course I grew up with my Dad taking me camping. Even being in the ocean at a very young age I think instilled situational confidence and ecological awareness. The skills of not confusing the signaling nature gives you when you are in her grasp can sometimes go a very long way.
     
  5. SurfGent

    SurfGent Suspended

    853
    article-0-1F49457E00000578-644_634x828.jpg
     
  6. SurfGent

    SurfGent Suspended

    853
    I wonder if she needs a hunting partner ? ;-)
     
  7. SurfGent

    SurfGent Suspended

    853
    hemingway_2_3108.jpg
     
  8. SurfGent

    SurfGent Suspended

    853
    Remember Hemingway. I warned you about your cat from crapping in my yard !
     
  9. In photo gallery on that site. First photo top left. He is holding what appears to be a "Trapper" model 1892 Winchester., 16" bbl. Probably .44 WCF. I doubt it is an Spanish "El Tigre" copy because a vast amount of short barrel or what many refered to as "baby" models ended up down south!

    Cool Photo!!!
     
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  10. BlueTrain

    BlueTrain One Too Many

    When Winchester introduced their Trapper models something like 30 years ago, I thought they were something new. But I happened to see a very old one in a collection, so they were in fact produced a long time ago. I don't remember, however, which model it was that I saw but very likely an 1892. I thought it was even more interesting that he had a rifle with a fixed bayonet in a photo.

    He apparently made a name for himself and appeared, as I think I mentioned, in a few movies, one of which was with Frank Buck before WWII entitled, I think, Jungle Menace. It's on YouTube but I haven't watched it. Clyde Beatty was also in a few movies as himself.
     
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  11. Blue Train,
    When Winchester reintroduced the trapper it was the Model 94. Available in several calibers. 30-30 and 45 colt come to mind.

    My old Compadre I was raised with, has a "baby 73" that letters correct from the Cody museum. It has a 14" barrel and I believe dates from 1884 or 86. I don't remember now.

    I do know the carbine came out of Mexico in either the early30's or late 20's wired to the runnIng board of an "A" Model Ford! :)

    Lots of those short barrel carbines went south to mining companies as guard guns.

    Interesting story about this one is his grand dad had it and would shoot at folks coming down the county road with it!!! This was in the 30's! ( remember Second Hand Lions???). So his uncle broke the firing pin in it so he wouldn't hurt anyone, or get thrown in jail! LOL!
     
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  12. Ok! Not quite a "Safari express" rifle but I found a pic of that 73 Trapper I happens to have.
    This is my old compadre. We've known each other since we was in 8th grade. He don't mind me posting his pic. He ranches in northern Blanco County Tx.
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. RJR

    RJR I'll Lock Up

    +1
     
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  14. RJR

    RJR I'll Lock Up

    Nice piece,appears to be in good condition.
     
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  15. Pushrod

    Pushrod One of the Regulars

    [​IMG]
    Not a big bore but my Winchester model 54 in cal. 30 GOVERNMENT 06 made in 1928.
     
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  16. SurfGent

    SurfGent Suspended

    853
    Beautiful!!!!! You still shoot her
     
  17. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom Practically Family

    Fun thread.

    I just finished writing a novel (purely for my amusement) in which the plot revolves around a cache of three-hundred Krag–Jørgensen 1892 rifles that are discovered in a secret subterranean cellar. The story-line takes place in modern times, i.e., today. The rifles are brand new (plus 120 years!) and still in their original wooden crates. They are in pretty good condition, all things considered. If cleaned up and ready to fire, these bolt-action Krags are capable of laying down 20 to 30 rounds a minute with an effective range of 3,000 feet. The story is a murder-mystery in which, it turns out, a nefarious spy agency is behind a plot to provide the batch of 300 rifles to a rebel group in the developing world. These rifles were chosen because they had long since completely dropped off the radar screen and they provide "plausible deniability" to the spooks. Suffice to say, the spies are sweeping up any undocumented weapons that they can find, from any source. The spymaster is cynically not expecting the rebels to win, he is just trying to stir up a little trouble in that particular banana republic for his own political reasons. My question is: how far-fetched is this plot? Rebels armed with obsolete weapons is fairly routine, although I admit that these are pushing the envelope. For other reasons in the book, involving actual historical events, the weapons must be this particular model/year of rifle. Just for context, my potboiler also includes an attractive seaplane pilot, a linguistic anthropologist, a tramp freighter in the Pacific, plenty of slow-moving ceiling fans, and even the occasional fedora and panama hat. Much of the action takes place in a Tiki Bar that hasn't changed much since its opening in 1957. A photo of an actual Krag–Jørgensen 1892 can be seen below.

    Krag 1892.jpg

    The murder mystery was loads of fun to write. So I won't be overly upset to learn that this plot is even crazier and unrealistic than a story about finding a lost ark.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2016
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  18. BlueTrain

    BlueTrain One Too Many

    And all rebels are excellent shots out to the maximum effective range of the rifles! Are the boxes marked "farm machinery?"

    Throw in a little smuggling, a native chief that could go either way, a newly discovered source of oil or gold or meteorium (a proved defense against the atomic bomb), and a couple of pretty girls (one good, the other even better) and it should make for a good plot. Add a local trader who happens to be an American and an old army buddy of the head of the spy agency or local operative and it should work nicely.
     
  19. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom Practically Family

    Ha ha! When the freighter is intercepted, it is found that the crates are marked "Typhoon relief aid".
     
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  20. Certainly sounds good to me!:)
     
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