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Seven-Plus Films to Watch For the Vintage

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By Scott Daniels


CottonClub.jpg


The film industry doesn't always get vintage right—and this doesn’t just apply to twentieth century set pieces. If you’ve seen the 1963 Cleopatra, which star Elizabeth Taylor found particularly embarrassing, you’ve seen some of the worst damage Hollywood can do, with 1960s hairdos and clothing styles all the rage in ancient Egypt.

When a film misses the mark completely, coming up with costumes, settings and hairstyles which in no way reflect the period they are attempting to portray, it can overtake an otherwise interesting picture. At times, this is intentional, as with Baz Luhrmann's Great Gatsby (2013), in which some of the music, costumes, etc., were moved into the 21st century to achieve a specific effect. At other times, it’s just a charging bull of a mess. In staying with the Fitzgerald novel, the 1974 Great Gatsby comes to mind. Or away from Fitzgerald, see 1967's Bonnie and Clyde.
Yeesh.

But when they get it right, it’s a magnificent thing to see. There’s always a small mistake to be spotted, but here are some good examples of movies or streaming series showing off vintage fashions in an authentic way, whether using originals or well-curated new work.


Peaky Blinders (BBC 2013-) / Boardwalk Empire (HBO, 2010-2014)



We lump these two together because they are similar in style and general storyline, Set in 1920s Birmingham, England and 1920s Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA, respectively, they follow the stories of crime families staking out territory and grabbing power in the post World War One era. Both expensively lavish, they are worth catching for the stylish and reasonably accurate costumes, sets, and great storytelling.


The Cotton Club (1984)


Starring Richard Gere, Diane Lane and Nicholas Cage, The Cotton Club was filmed when there were still racks upon racks of late 20s-early 30s clothing available at the local Goodwill, and the movie’s costume designers make full use of excellent, original pieces. Though a little dated to watch now, it’s still one of the best examples of proper use of vintage styles on the screen.


Mad Men (AMC 2007-2015)


Following the story of the rise and inglorious dissemination of second-tier Madison Avenue ad agency Sterling-Cooper, Mad Men begins on the eve of the 1960 U.S. presidential election and takes us through the many social upheavals of the 1960s and 70s. The series nails the vibe of the time, not just in clothes, but every tiny set detail from office equipment to social norms. Stay with it to get past early blatant sexism and it’s worth binging from Don Draper’s early musings on cigarette smoking through Peggy Olson’s… trust us, just watch it.


Dunkirk (2017)


There are several excellent movies and series set on and off the battlefields of World War Two which get things mostly right, including Saving Private Ryan (1998), Band of Brothers (HBO 2001), and Hacksaw Ridge (2016) to name a very few. Dunkirk, one of the most recent, has been widely acclaimed for accuracy across the board.


The Artist (2011)


The Artist proved so much to vintage watchers. Hollywood can, when it wants to, do things with remarkable style and accuracy. It also proved that silent films can still tell a story more than 80 years after their demise with the coming of sound.

Babylon Berlin (Netflix, 2017)


You can almost smell the unbathed bodies while watching Babylon Berlin. The film is set in 1930's Berlin, Germany, as Communism, the NSDAP and others struggle to take control of the Weimar Republic. Drugs, sex, music and debauchery are all on hand, in a well presented and researched Netflix series.

Jeeves and Wooster (BBC 1990)


Starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, fans of Television's House will hardly believe the latter is the same fellow. The series is based on the stories by P.G. Wodehouse, and the sets, costumes, and notably, hats, are pretty much all to die for. See Bertie Wooster's apartment for serious art deco furnishings and accessories. See Jeeves for everything else.

Feel free to leave other suggestions--or films with glaring flaws--in the comments.
About author
scotrace
Aside from helping manage things around The Fedora Lounge, I'm a freelance writer and award winning food columnist. The foodie Insta is @weatewellandcheaply.

Comments

Tried to watch Dunkirk, but although the set, costumes, location, cinematography and actors were great, the movie was awful. I fast-forwarded it many times as the pacing was horrible for so long a film. I understand they didn't want it to be a documentary, but there wasn't enough character development to make it a personal story either. It was no Lawrence of Arabia, that's for sure.
I'm with you. In fact, I might as well be living on the dark side of the moon, because I think everything from Peaky Blinders to Mad Men to Downtown Abbey is revisionist crap masquerading as 'entertainment'.

I can't imagine what the collective I.Q. is for everyone now to watch this bland pap and to be thrilled by it. I realize I'm in the minority, so I stick with older movies and classics and have no idea what the storylines are for "The Office" or "30 Rock" either.
 
The Crown on Netflix is doing particularly well, not least with some wonderful old aeroplanes, all CGI of course, but impressive nonetheless, and some more real cars and motorcycles. Looks accurate clothing wise a well. The only howler I have spotted is Major James Hewitt wearing captain's insignia.
 
Yes! Have seen just about everything you mention except The Cotton Club. Jeeves and Wooster remains a personal favorite not just for the attire, but also the ridiculous situational comedy and masterful adaptation to the small screen. Best Regards, H-U
 
Tried to watch Dunkirk, but although the set, costumes, location, cinematography and actors were great, the movie was awful. I fast-forwarded it many times as the pacing was horrible for so long a film. I understand they didn't want it to be a documentary, but there wasn't enough character development to make it a personal story either. It was no Lawrence of Arabia, that's for sure.
i couldnt finish it either, and i love war movies
 
"Dunkirk, one of the most recent, has been widely acclaimed for accuracy across the board."

I'd have to disagree re Dunkirk's "accuracy" - at least in regards to the part about the RAF Fighter planes. There is little to no way that a piston engine fighter with its engine shot out could outmaneuver a fully-powered ME-109 and be able to shoot it down.
 
What do you think of start dressers? I like to folow them. May they cant always work as they would love the mainly of them have tons of knowledge. I wanna point here PROFESSIONAL STAR DRESSERS.....not like the Cohens care as much as PTA.

https://blog.wardrobesupplies.com/mws-industry-profiles-star-dresser-monica-ruiz-ziegler/

Is being said that Monica fights for accuracy. She got the word for De Niro to decide which look suits him better in make up and wardrove (actually she had a beef in Irishman with scorssese and his team loosing perspective with CGI).
Also Clemen, the spanish producer who got the team that does the main spanish movies including some theatre dressers (Trueba, Almodovar...she refuses to work with the cheap De La Iglesia. So refuses propmakers as Montoya after worked with him. His western is awful )
Clemen has MATY by her side. (MATY the Madrid costume store who owns the largest collection of real vintage wardrobe as they produce the clothes for centuries for theatre in spain. They got a warehouse that is impressive. Or like the royal opera in London where on stage is the real clothing never washed but cleaned with ozone )
 
I just watched all five seasons of Board Walk Empire. Great episodes along with fantastic classic hats and wardrobes for that time period. Highly recommended if you enjoy film for mature audiences.
 
For a little later in time period, but still very vintage at 50 years old, check out The Mary Tyler Moore show. It's available on an basic amazon account. AMAZING clothes... I've never seen a double breasted sweater before! :D

The show really captures how all the rules were being broken in the 70s. At one point Mary wears a double rider motorcyle jacket and matching skirt. In gingham! All the classic pieces are redone, deconstructed men's sportcoats in knit, Safari jacket dresses, the patterns and colors are a riot, and polyester everything. It's an obomonation, but it's all so fun and playfull. I wouldn't emulate the style, but it's a real hoot to watch the show and stop and ask "WHAT is THAT?!?"

Also, Jeeves and Wooster is all on youtube for free, if anyone's looking for it. One of my favorite shows.
 
Thoroughly enjoyed 'Babylon Berlin'. I thought it gave fascinating insights into an otherwise often overlooked yet important transitional period. Also was happy to see the absinthe accoutrements interspersed throughout the series, as I enjoy the occassional glass of La Fee Verte during l'heure verte. (Albeit AFTER I discovered absinthe was legal in the U.S.A.! Absinthe antiques are now also another guilty pleasure!)

'Jeeves and Wooster' seems very interesting, but I couldn't find it on any of the streaming channels, and the price on Amazon was well over $200. Since some of my favorite television series are from the U.K., however, I'd purchased a multi-region DVD player some years back and found that Amazon.co.uk sells the 'Jeeves and Wooster' series as about $130 under the U.S. price- so naturally I splurged. I highly recommend checking Amazon.co.uk when it comes to outlandish prices here in the States for British television series or books.

One movie I'd add to this vintage collection is Netflix's 'The Highwaymen' about the Texas Rangers who took down Bonnie and Clyde. It felt authentic and truth be told I enjoyed it because 1. it's about Texas and 2. it shows in some detail the transition of the Texas Rangers from a force engaged against desperadoes of every ilk using horse sense, tracking, and grit into a technology reliant 'modern' policing force. That was striking, especially when one considers the world of 'Lonesome Dove' was a mere 50 years prior. For me it was also about the power of character opposed to reliance on the ease of technology - a struggle which stills goes on today.
I have lost count of the times I have re-watched The Highway men, love it...
 
I'm with you. In fact, I might as well be living on the dark side of the moon, because I think everything from Peaky Blinders to Mad Men to Downtown Abbey is revisionist crap masquerading as 'entertainment'.

I can't imagine what the collective I.Q. is for everyone now to watch this bland pap and to be thrilled by it. I realize I'm in the minority, so I stick with older movies and classics and have no idea what the storylines are for "The Office" or "30 Rock" either.
I love all those shows and Dunkirk. My IQ is 126.
 
Poirot, Miss Marple, Jeeves and Wooster are firm favourites of mine.

As others have noted, there are many great films from the 30s 40s and 50s. No need to watch period recreations.

Just a few examples:
Blond Cheat (1938)
Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)
Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)
Easy Living (1937)
Romance in Manhattan (1934)
Dodsworth (1936)
Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
The Third Man (1949)
Sun Valley Serenade (1941)
Random Harvest (1942)
The Red Shoes (1948)
 

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