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Books About 20th Century Men's Hats?

Messages
19,073
Location
Funkytown, USA
I'm interested in learning more about mid-20th century men's hats. Can anyone recommend some books about them?

Not just one. There is a Stetson book out there, and I think a history of Borsalino. Nothing comprehensive that I know of.

Fact is, you're in the best place in the world to learn about hats - period. It takes a bit of poking around sometimes, but this site is rich with hat information.

I might also direct you to The Hatted Professor website for certain information. He was a Member here for quite some time, and his site is good, if unfinished.
 

stevensonbruce

New in Town
Messages
3
Not just one. There is a Stetson book out there, and I think a history of Borsalino. Nothing comprehensive that I know of.

Fact is, you're in the best place in the world to learn about hats - period. It takes a bit of poking around sometimes, but this site is rich with hat information.

I might also direct you to The Hatted Professor website for certain information. He was a Member here for quite some time, and his site is good, if unfinished.
Thanks for the information. Initially I found the website hard to navigate. But I am starting to get the hang of it. I thought a book would be easier.
 
Messages
19,073
Location
Funkytown, USA
Thanks for the information. Initially I found the website hard to navigate. But I am starting to get the hang of it. I thought a book would be easier.

It would, but where's the adventure in that?

We've discussed a Wiki, but it seems too daunting without hours and resources to get it done. I suppose somebody could write a book using the FL as a source. Maybe when I retire in a few years.

Many of us have read this site pretty thoroughly and picked up shared knowledge from other Members. It's more of an apprenticeship, LOL.
 
I can highly recomend "Hat Talk" by Debbie Henderson found here:

Also there is also a good one one the history of tha Panama Hat that the name of escapes me at the moment......
 

Rmccamey

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,588
Location
Central Texas
The Man in the Bowler Hat by Robinson is a classic. It is not so much a book about hats as it is a philosophy about hats, bowlers in particular, and a sort of history of what wearing a hat says to the world.

1131560640.0.m.jpg 20210222_184859.jpg
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
This is a great idea for a thread. I have quite a few books on hats (probably like most of us do). I'll try to list as many of them as possible with a little review.
First is this one:
Giuliani Folledore
Men’s hats (Il cappello da uomo)


Hardcover, 128 pages
Drama Pub (1 augustus 1996)

Mens-Hats-The-Twentieth-Century-Histories-of-Fashion-Series.jpg


As an overview about hats ans history, mainly of the 20th century, I like this one quite a bit. Loads of pictures and illustrations and lots of information. You should be able to get a copy of this second hand somewhere. Highly recommended.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
I can highly recomend "Hat Talk" by Debbie Henderson found here:
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Also there is also a good one one the history of tha Panama Hat that the name of escapes me at the moment......
I concur with Mark on this one.
Debbie Henderson
Hat Talk


Hat_Talk_Debbie_Henderson_1.jpg


Paperback 150 pages
The Wild Goose Press; 1st ed edition (January 1, 2002)

Henderson is a scholar and an authority on hats and hatmaking on which she has written more books. In this book she lets the actual hatmakers do the talking in an interview format (hence the name) along with her own observations about the industry the brands and history. Not exactly aimed at the casual reader, but also highly recommended. The books is still available.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
@RBH mentioned Tom Miller's book.

Tom Miller
The panama hat trail


panama hat trail.jpg

Paperback: 236 pages
UNIV OF ARIZONA PR; Reprint edition (10 oktober 2017)

This is as much a travel book as it is a comprehensive description of the whole chain of the panama hat, from weaving to trading and selling. Start to finish. It is a great read, but it is just that: there are no pictures in the book. It's just not that kind of book. Recommended if you want to know more about the panama hat and its meaning to Ecuador. The book is still in print.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
There is another book on the subject of panama hats.
MARTINE BUCHET (author),
LAZIZ HAMANI (photographer)
Panama legendary hats


panama assouline.jpg

Hardcover, 134 pages
ASSOULINE; Illustrated edition (16 oktober 2014)

This book is more or less the opposite of Tom Miller's book: not a whole lot to read, but a massive amount of great photos. The book is quite large and is more or less a coffee table book. Well worth it though, if you can find a copy that's affordable. The book is no longer in print, but you should be able to find a copy. Highly recommended if you like nice photographs.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
Another one, but quite specific about one maker.

Rupert Battersby
Battersby Hats of Stockport: An Illustrated History

battersby hats.jpg


Paperback, 128 pages
Amberley Publishing; UK ed editie (15 november 2016)

Rupert Battersby is the great grandson of the founder of Battersby Hats, and son of the last Managing Director and as a member of the family did of course have access tot he family archives and pictures to illustrate his research. The emphasis in the book is however on the family and its history and not as much on the hatting as I would have liked to see. That is not to say it isn’t worthwhile. It certainly is. Not only the Battersby themselves, but also their relations and dealings with other hatmanufacturers like Fritz Hückel and Casimir Mossant get, if brief, a mention.
Recommended and it's still easily available.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
Here's another worthwile book on hats.

Penny McKnight
Stockport Hatting


mcknight.jpg


Paperback, 82 pages
Published December 1st 2000 by Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council Community

McKnight does a wonderful job in giving an overview of the Stockport hatters that made up the core of the English hat industry. Well researched and lots of illustrations and pictures. Trying to cover the histories of the Stockport hatters within 82 pages means it is not as in depth as hat afficionados would like, but there is no other book that gives a better insight in hat manufacture in the greater Manchester area.
Highly recommended. With a little effort this book can still be found.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
Adele Campione
Men's Hats


cappello da uomo.jpg


Paperback ‏ : ‎ 143 pages
Chronicle Books; 1st edition (14 Jun. 2000)

This a lovely little book and well worth getting. Campione chooses a varied approach to hats. First of all chronological (stopping in 1950), then by country and then some general information. Its main attraction is that it provdes wonderful photographs in the same style throughout, like the example on the cover. It's still available and well worth getting a copy of. Recommended.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
A niche subject but a great read, this one.
Jeremy Seal
A fez of the heart

a fez of the heart.jpg


paperback: 352 pages
Harper Paperbacks; First edition (March 28, 1996)

Comparable to Tom Miller's book about panama hats, this book takes a similar approach to the fez. As much a travel book therefore as a hat book, but the history of the fez does get the attention it deserves. A great read and recommended for those interested in hats . The book is still available.
 

GHT

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,251
Location
New Forest
hats uk.jpg
The British are masters of snobbery, and that includes hat snobbery.

Many of the world's most famous hats have their origins in Britain; in the Middle Ages there were civil and religious laws requiring hats to be worn and in Victorian Britain a person would no more leave home without a hat than a pair of trousers.

It is no surprise that London's oldest surviving shop, Lock and Co., is a hatter. From practical everyday caps and bonnets to military headwear, top hats, and even the coronation crown, hats of all sorts have passed through its doors and continue to do so after more than 300 years.

In this book David Long reveals how much of Britain's social history can be understood through its headwear, and in exploring the ways in which a hat speaks volumes about its wearer's rank and status he tells the stories of the people beneath some of the most famous hats of history.

For a real insight into our class system and the snobbery that goes with it, look up William Makepeace Thackeray, The Book of Snobs.
 
Messages
17,795
Location
Nederland
View attachment 417131
The British are masters of snobbery, and that includes hat snobbery.

Many of the world's most famous hats have their origins in Britain; in the Middle Ages there were civil and religious laws requiring hats to be worn and in Victorian Britain a person would no more leave home without a hat than a pair of trousers.

It is no surprise that London's oldest surviving shop, Lock and Co., is a hatter. From practical everyday caps and bonnets to military headwear, top hats, and even the coronation crown, hats of all sorts have passed through its doors and continue to do so after more than 300 years.

In this book David Long reveals how much of Britain's social history can be understood through its headwear, and in exploring the ways in which a hat speaks volumes about its wearer's rank and status he tells the stories of the people beneath some of the most famous hats of history.

For a real insight into our class system and the snobbery that goes with it, look up William Makepeace Thackeray, The Book of Snobs.
It's sitting on the "to read" pile right now. Leafing through it quickly I thought that it could have used more pictures.
 

GHT

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,251
Location
New Forest
What I would recommend Stefan is P.G. Wodehouse's tales of The British class system as told through upper class snob, Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves, consisting of 35 short stories and 11 novels.

Wodehouse was an avid reader of the classics and in Wooster and Jeeves you can easily see Shakespeare's characters, Iago and Othello. Iago's role is one of Othello's outwardly loyal courtier and friend, who in fact hates him and schemes his downfall. He also manipulates his friends and master into doing his bidding, eventually persuading Othello to believe that his wife, Desdemona, has been having an affair, resulting in Othello killing her in a jealous rage.

Not that Jeeves would ever consider such a tactic, but manipulative he certainly is. There have been countless portrayals on TV and cinema, but there's nothing like the books to capture the British class system.
 

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