BRITISH Belt-Back Suits and Sports Jackets

Discussion in 'Suits' started by Two Types, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    oh, there's the 30s plus four belt back suit that Marc bought of course...


    [​IMG]


    (seller's photos) ;)
     
  2. Like we could forget! That's 3 of them …
     
  3. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Wasn't Marc's British made, but made for the American market?
     
  4. No, as far as I recall, it was made bespoke in the UK for an American, who took it back with him. the hat is certainly British made as well.

    Though they were clearly available, I'm not entirely sure of their popularity. I'd love to read some tailoring journals for the spring seasons 1937-1940, see what they say about them. I wonder what, if anything, Ben's batch of Mens Wear magazine says about the trend …

    bk
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  5. Fletch

    Fletch I'll Lock Up

    Do you suppose that, because of the piecing, they didn't wear as long so fewer survive?
     
  6. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    perhaps they weren't ever as popular as we (enthusiasts) might expect with the average Brit, then when the war came it halted the new 'trend' before it really got going, then it was never taken up again after the war.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  7. The other possibility is that they were so popular that they got worn to rags and it's actually true that most of what we find is "Sunday best", which would inevitably not be sporty casual styles.

    bk
     
  8. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Another possiblity:

    Belt backs were popular with younger men in the late 1930s. They were the age group that went into the army circa 1939/1940 (the first age group to be called up were the 21 year olds who, were the right abge to be the likely owners of belt backs). The army found many of its recruits grew taller and put on weight as a result of military training. As such, they may have soon grown out of their belt backs. By the time they got home post-war, the belt backs didn't fit and were left to be handed down to little brothers etc. However, for the post-war generation the belt back was ridiculously out of fashion. So with the original owners having grown out of them and their little brothers thinking they were unfashionable, they got worn for work (and thus soon wore out) or they got sold for rags.
     
  9. note that I have updated the Houndsditch Warehouse Co. picture, above.
     
  10. Ben Stephens

    Ben Stephens One of the Regulars

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    I will get reading! I am sure there are one or two adverts for them.

    Ben
     
  11. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    I just found this photo of my dad circa 1941. His sports jacket appears to have pleated pockets, making me wonder if it was also a belt-back. it's a pity he's not around anymore to ask:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    'Brighton Rock' again. Here's William Hartnell:

    [​IMG]

    Jimmy Hanley in 'The Way Ahead' (1944):

    rear view:
    [​IMG]

    front view
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Ben Stephens

    Ben Stephens One of the Regulars

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  14. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    great photo of your dad TT. he's dressed like many of us aspire to dress now, and he's only what... 14 ?
     
  15. If he were 14 his jacket would probably fit me! Now you're just taunting me, hbk.

    I love the big, wide boutonniere hole in that lapel.

    bk
     
  16. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    I'm guessing the date for the photo of my dad. The fact that he is dressed relatively formally makes me think it might have been his outfit for his confirmation, which is around the age of 13 in the Catholic Church. Thus 1942. (He certainly didn't dress like that for school - he didn't go to school for his last year, anyway - nor did he dress like that for work in a shoe repair shop)

    It's true, plenty of us do asire to that look. I think I did, even before I ever found the photograph.

    Yes, BK. My dad was quite a large chap for his age. I wouldn't be surprised if that jacket was your size.
     
  17. Metatron

    Metatron One Too Many

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    Here is a rather late sighting, according to what has been discussed. A somewhat conservative looking example, at least from the front. From 'Hunted' 1952:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Would this have been an old jacket, or is there a possibility that it was contemporary?
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2012
  18. DamianM

    DamianM Vendor

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    ououuch
     
  19. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    hard to say.
    perhaps we've overstressed the limited time period of Brit belted back jackets on this thread so far. while the heyday would have been pre-war there's bound to have been some made after the war too, up to the mid 50s (which, in my experience is when the 30's - 40's Brit look finally fizzled out. 1956 to be precise ;)).
     
  20. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    A few more adverts:

    Jacksons, 1936:
    [​IMG]

    April 1939, in addition to belt-back sports jackets, this advert offers belt-back suits for boys:
    [​IMG]

    1938. The Co-op offers 'fancy back' sports jackets:
    [​IMG]
    (Note the Tarsal Straps on his shoes)
     

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