British Workwear

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Two Types, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Those collars look great.
     
  2. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    i wouldn't have expected to see something that long from 1921 would you ? (although there are some unusually long sports shirt collars from the mid-teens to early '20s in photos of cricketers etc.).
    for a longer collar though i still prefer the pointier end rather than those round tips.
     
  3. esteban68

    esteban68 Call Me a Cab

    Aren't they called ' penny round'collars?
     
  4. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    i haven't heard that before, but it sounds good !
     
  5. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

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    You see I've heard both the old double-round collars called that, as well as the 1970s manifestations. I've never been clear what exactly a 'penny round' is
     
  6. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    Google search seems to suggest the 'penny round' is the narrow rounded 'club' type of collar.
     
  7. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

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    Try '1970s penny round collar'. Monstrous.
     
  8. esteban68

    esteban68 Call Me a Cab

    Have a look on the www.classicwardrobe.co.uk site there's a fairly nice penny round on there currently on sale it even has holes in the collar for collar bars / pins.....sadly limited stock!
    I was always told a penny round was essentially a 'standard' classic style collar with the points rounded off ant the straight with curved ends as a club collar....as always it's all in the language!
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2015
  9. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    I think I have a photo somewhere of my great-uncle wearing a similar collar with pin. It must be no later than very early 1920s (since he ied in the early twenties).
     
  10. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    from the 1954, Marshall Ward catalogue:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

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    The tweed trousers are interesting. Apparently my wife's grandfather had a thick pair of tweed trousers that he wore for farming all weathers, hot or cold.

    Sent from my GT-I9195 using Tapatalk
     
  12. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

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    I have seen quite a few long collars in those Canadian magazines. This picture has one with rounded tips, too. I think it must be from 1917 or so.

    [​IMG]

    I myself have a somewhat longer rounded collar from the era too, though not quite as long as the ones in the photo:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    so much collar variety from that period.

    ('tape links'... interesting)
     
  14. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

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    Lovely collar, and a great little advert there. I suppose collars were another affordable way for regular gents to express their own style. Regular gents don't get the option these days. It's spread or right angular or nothing!

    Sent from my GT-I9195 using Tapatalk
     
  15. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

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    Oh, yes I have a folder full of collar ads, just from those Canadian magazines.

    I think 'tape links' refers to a tape with a button on each side that goes through a button hole on each side of the collar.

    Schermafbeelding 2015-09-29 om 10.33.01.jpg

    Eddie, thanks! Yes it's quite a shame about today's collars. I really like the option of picking whichever collar I feel like when wearing a collarless shirt.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2015
  16. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    please post a pic if you have one (in the 'shirt collar oddities' thread)... i'm looking for evidence of how these button links were constructed.
     
  17. Dostioffsky

    Dostioffsky One of the Regulars

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    Will do when I get home tonight! I am not sure if I have a clear/definite picture of this button link, though. I do have a few variations in link or button types... Like the 'Tooke hook', but more of that in the right thread, tonight!
     
  18. Barmey

    Barmey One of the Regulars

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    Merry Christmas folks

    This probably belongs in the British Suits thread, but here's a cool peice of tailoring being used in this lads work attire.
    [​IMG]

    Love this 1943 photo taken by Cecil Beaton. You can see by the Cresent pockets that this was cleary once a very fashionable jacket. Edward VIII popularised cresent pockets in the mid 20s. Here's another example HBK posted on page 44 of the British Suits thread.

    [​IMG]
     
    Edward likes this.
  19. esteban68

    esteban68 Call Me a Cab

    When old fashioned becomes workwear!
    As an engineering apprentice is the early 1980's many of the older guys would come to work in odd suit parts , tweed jackets and their like ....wool was preferred as it didn't burn as easily as terylene....I guess looking back now I suspect much of the stuff they were wearing would have been from the fifties or earlier.
     
    Edward likes this.
  20. QuirkyQueen

    QuirkyQueen New in Town

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    My grand parents, my grandfather was a gardener, picture taken mid 1960s sully2.jpg
     

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