Bush Jackets

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by Matt Deckard, Nov 26, 2005.

  1. Wyldkarma

    Wyldkarma One Too Many

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    Just found this forum . Loved old Banana republic stores. Have several vintage artifacts from them. Here's 2 of my faves.
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  2. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Very sharp. Looks good and they are rare collectibles. I especially love the hatband.
     
  3. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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  4. Oldsarge

    Oldsarge One Too Many

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    I guess from Vienna you could get to Africa for $800. Sadly for those of us on the Left Coast of N. America it's LOT more. And that jacket is nonsense, anyway.
     
  5. Correus

    Correus New in Town

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    Recently added this bush jacket to the adventurers closet.

    Purchased it from a lady who said her father wore it while in South Africa and East Africa during the late '60s & early '70s. He worked with some company that showed visiting dignitaries around. She said it was "appropriate" to wear when showing them the countryside.

    20200525_111608.jpg
     
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  6. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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  7. 1961MJS

    1961MJS My Mail is Forwarded Here

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  8. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    1961MJS, thank you for introducing me to Peter Capstick. I plan on ordering a copy of “Death in the Long Grass”. Reading about the man, I am struck by the way he completely walked away from the zeitgeist of the 1970s. I’m delighted to find that there are still holes in my education regarding the existence of such colorful characters. Do you have a favorite book of his to recommend? And why is that?

    https://www.shakariconnection.com/peter-hathaway-capstick-books.html

    Regarding suede, I’m afraid —for me— it conjures up images of a decade (the 70s) when I was still an awkward pimply faced adolescent struggling to figure out the world. Putting on a suede jacket would take me right back there, I’m afraid. No thanks. :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
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  9. Correus

    Correus New in Town

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    LOL I was in Grade school and Jr. High during the '70s. Other than footwear, the only thing that comes to mind when I think about suede is disco, 1970s crime dramas and cheesey porn stars!!!

    However... my newest bush jacket has suede chest pads and elbow patches and it was worn in the '60s and '70s by its original owner. You can see it in my post a few posts before this one.

    As to Peter Capstick's books... a couple other authors you might enjoy are Martin and Osa Johnson.
     
  10. 1961MJS

    1961MJS My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Hi, all of Peter Capstick's books are good. I would suggest Skipping the book on going on a Safari, it's very dated. Not that it isn't well written, but you can't hunt any of the Big 5 now except for Buffalo. Elephants are about gone, white or black Rhino's ARE gone (if memory serves), Lions are a maybe and Leopards are out. Capstick's books mention that of course leopards appear to be extinct, they hunt at night and all.

    I also highly recommend Robert Ruark's "the old man and the boy" and "the old man and the boy returns", you can get both together from amazon. Boyhood in Maryland area.

    later
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
  11. Correus

    Correus New in Town

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    The Southern White rhino and the Black rhino are allowed to be hunted as a trophy in South Africa and Namibia. Only 5 Black rhinos are allowed per year and the Southern White fluctuates. Only males are allowed to be hunted and they must meet certain criteria. First are biological principles such as age, post-mating reproductivity, overall health (illness, disease, and such). Second is, those who may have a detrimental effect on the overall rhino population, by being aggressive or territorial. Removing ‘problem’ Rhinos are thought to enable a higher growth rate for or greater genetic diversity of the population as a whole.

    Hunting for rhinos is only allowed only under strict permit conditions, and permits are granted by the in-country CITES management authorities.

    Elephant hunting is allowed in African countries where their populations are stable and adequately protected and well managed. The criteria for hunting them is basically the same as that of the Rhino.

    It's perfectly legal to hunt Lions, it depends on the location, such as private reserve vs national park. The criteria for hunting them is basically the same as that of the Rhino.

    As to Leopards, only free roaming, self-sustaining and adult ones may be hunted as trophies and must have a minimum skull measurement of 32cm for. The criteria for hunting them is basically the same as that of the Rhino.

    In all of these cases females are typically off limits. However, there are instances where females are allowed to be hunted, especially when there is a need to remove a ‘problem’ female.

    Also, as far as I know the hunting permits are issued based on a lottery system. About the cheapest of the above to hunt is the Lion at around $40K as a base price. The Rhino is typically well over $250k. Another issue is the 'trophy' itself. It can be incredibly difficult to export the trophy out of Africa and then it can be incredibly difficult to import it into your home country, such as the USA. The export/import cost can be exorbitant.
     
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  12. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Today’s news re: Trophy hunting in Africa:
    https://www.latimes.com/california/...-wants-to-ban-trophy-hunting-la-man-is-target
    I guess I can see both sides of the argument. If “managed” hunting is legal and contributes to long-term sustainability, why not? Unless you are a strict vegetarian, hunting is a fair option under controlled circumstances. On the other hand, if hunting is contributing to accelerated extinction, that’s a problem.
     
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  13. Correus

    Correus New in Town

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    Personally I don't have an issue with hunting, I grew up hunting and still go at times. I'm a firm believer in hunting only those things you will eat and only take the amount you need. I do not agree with hunting just for trophies, I think it's wrong. When it comes to the types of animals we've mentioned, as well as others like them, I don't think it should be allowed at all.

    I do understand the reasoning behind allowing it to be done, yet I'm still on the fence about it. On one hand I can see how it is good, especially knowing a lot of tge money goes towards animal welfare aspects as well as the people in the area. Do you remember the story about the young lady that was allowed to hunt that Giraffe? That was a big eye opener as to how much it benefited the local tribe in the area.

    On the other hand though... I wonder if there might be a more humane way to put the animal down. A gun shot will most definitely do that, yet there is no guarantee that the rich guy who gets to do it is a good enough shot to take down the animal with one shot. Even a seasoned hunter can mess up a shot and end up just wounding the animal.
     
  14. 1961MJS

    1961MJS My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I think my semi-quotes of Capstick are based on my home country (and his) not letting you bring anything in except Buffalo and possibly Lion. Good information.

    I wouldn't hunt a Rhino based on Capstick's description of them. Blind and stupid at best. I read that lots of them were killed when the Lunatic line (railroad) was built from the East coast of Africa inland. They kept fighting the locomotives...

    Later
     
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  15. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    As someone who has hunted, I do not oppose hunting species with healthy numbers like deer, turkey, etc, but sadly the poaching of large African mammals for skins and ivory has decimated their numbers, and countries selling off spot to hunt them legally is not helping their numbers. Yes, the meat goes to local villages, yes the money is used (partially) for conservation funding, but if you hunt the species into extinction, there will be nothing left to conserve.

    There are rangers in Africa that will viciously, and without remorse, any poacher they see, and I actively applaud it. Poachers are a ruthless lot who will actively slaughter villages of locals as much as animals. I'd be curious how they'd react to find their heads taxidermied to a wall. A most dangerous game indeed.
     
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  16. fireman

    fireman One of the Regulars

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    Trophy hunting is an import part of wild life management and preservation in Africa. If hunters don't put a value on the animals many will be killed as pests. Elephants destroy crops, Lions kill livestock, Cape Buffalo are just mean. Poachers will kill many also for parts. Organs etc are thought to bring cures in parts of Chinese culture. Many African countries have no money to employ rangers to protect the herds from the poachers. The only source of income is hunting.

    Consider this, Kenya banned hunting completely in 1977. There game populations have plummeted. Tsavo (of The Ghost and the Darkness fame) was estimated ot have 20,000 lions in 1970. Now the population is less than 2,000. They may not have any lions left in 20 years.:(
     
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  17. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Killing a species to conserve the species is not a sustainable conservation model. Local farmers kill these animals regardless of their worth. They actively hunt destructive elephants, and kill lions with poisoned meat. Obviously making these animals worth something is not working.

    Eventually, these animals will be "conserved" into extinction.
     
  18. Lean'n'mean

    Lean'n'mean My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Human population in Kenya 1970 = 11.3 million. Population in Kenya 2020 = 53.7 million.
    I think you'll find the expotential growth of the human population & the subsequent pressures on the land & resources has more to do with the fall in lion ( & wildlife in general) numbers than the lack of trophy hunting.
    But all large mammals across the globe are destined to become extinct before the end of this century since their existance is no longer compatable with human activity & interests.
     
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  19. fireman

    fireman One of the Regulars

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    I'm really not sure what you are trying to say. Making game animals worth something has definitely worked. Here in the US we are awash in game animals in many places because the are valued by hunters. Hunters will pay to hunt them and that money goes to help manage them. Deer, turkey, pheasant, sheep, Elk, Ducks etc have all benefited by management. They have value to hunters so we will pay fees, taxes etc to manage them. Some countries in Africa have adopted this policy and have strong populations other have not and the results show.
     
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  20. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Deer, turkey, and pheasant are not critically endangered due to human encroachment and being considered nuisance animals. I'd say the situation in Africa is more akin to wolf numbers in the first parts of 20th century, prior to conservation efforts. Their numbers are only what they are today because of breeding programs, and because stiff penalties were introduced to farmers and ranchers caught poaching and trapping them. At no point did anybody consider that shooting wolves would increase their numbers.
     

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