Engineer Boots, Harness Boots...

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Creeping Past, Dec 12, 2008.

  1. regius

    regius One Too Many

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    Rios of Mercedes? Are they custom as I’ve never heard of them offering engineers


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  2. handymike

    handymike I'll Lock Up

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    Yes, Rios of Mercedes.
    They were on sale at Rockmount Ranchwear in Denver. They have 2 pair (10 and 11). They told me that these were the only ones they’ve seen like this.
     
  3. Blackadder

    Blackadder One Too Many

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    Rumour is that Rios made the "2nd batch" RRL engineer boots after Julian.
     
  4. So33

    So33 Familiar Face

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    Location:
    Seattle
    image.jpeg image.jpeg My Frye harness boots, pictures don't show the rich color of the leather. Turned over to show the extra leather on the soles. It appears to be original and not cobbled on or resoled. These are the older made in USA model. My daughter spotted them few years ago at a Thrift store called Goodwill. $50.00.
    Show them if you got them!
     
  5. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    3A4B26AA-7245-41F5-A702-BD403011280D.jpeg The thread has gone too long without action. Thought i’d post up a WIWT
     
  6. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    A004AC1E-670D-4029-96AF-AF9230FE3BBF.png Tbh this never would have occurred to me. Then i saw this picture and thought “of course!”
     
  7. Dav

    Dav One Too Many

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    Mornin, a bit of Role Club colour 8 yesterday. IMG_20190704_083750-1824x1368.jpg
     
  8. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    9C272DD3-9C15-4F70-8554-CF645DCFF008.png
    These look pretty cool
     
  9. regius

    regius One Too Many

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    Don’t ever buy these lol


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  10. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    Quality lacking?
     
  11. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    Anyone have a link for an article detailing stylistic changes for engineer boots through the decades?
     
  12. bluesmandan

    bluesmandan One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    United States
    There’s plenty of stuff to read if you google: history engineer boot. Basically it was a black thick leathered loose fitting tall heeled boot that one cinched up with the instep strap, and it was built to protect the guys shoveling coal on trains (called firemen, not engineers, ironically). It protected from heat, shovels, and dirty coal. I would think pants legs were tucked in the shaft and the shaft strap was tightened over the pants, so no chance of burning your pants leg or getting hot coal into your boot.

    Then the style caught on with ww2 vets that came back from Europe having learned to appreciate motorcycle riding, as the boots design lent itself to the same sort of function. No laces to get caught on anything. Protected your legs and pants from the heat of the motor. Black color blended with road grime. Brando iconized and popularized the look in “the wild one”. From historical pictures it looks like most people opted to roll up their pants legs instead of tucking them in.

    Iterations of the boot occur later, after Brando popularized the boot. I’d say primarily after the 70’s, when the boot’s use gets far removed from coal shoveling and bike riding. Different colors are used since it isn’t hiding coal and asphalt grime. Leather gets thinner. Heel gets shorter. Toe gets lower (not from use but by design). Shaft gets tighter. Shaft gets shorter. There was a single short shafted model available from Sears in the 50’s, but I wouldn’t wager on its popularity.

    I have never read when the steel toe started being used with them, but I would guess after the motorcycle riders started favoring them, as it adds a bit of protection I suppose. Probably not good in its first use connected to hot coal since it would have heated up the toes.

    The boot seems to have remained mostly unchanged for about 40 or 50 years after its invention in the 30’s. The wild one had a huge and lasting impact... both for iconizing the boots design so its primary design would remain unchanged, but also popularizing it so that there would be people who wanted to change it. But big changes didn’t occur for quite some time. The many iterations of it that sears offered in the 50’s (because of the wild one no doubt) were all remarkably similar.

    This is all just my musings from what I can piece together from a lot of different articles and pictures. There must be others here more knowledgeable than I on the topic.


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  13. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    Thanks for taking the time to give a thorough reply. I think i should have started with a more specific question. Some ad descriptions and posts here refer to “1940’s style” or “toe shape popularized in the 1950’s”
    It is descriptions of some of these differences i am curious about. I am aware that different makers use different lasts but their are very noticeable asthetic differences between for instance Wesco 100 yr, Biltbuc, and Role Club. I’m curious if these represent styles of different decades.
     
  14. Mich486

    Mich486 Practically Family

    Messages:
    718
    As far as I understand early types (20s/30s) of engineer boots were similar to the Mister Freedom Road Champs with a flat toe. The bilt buck (Attractions) are more 1950s inspired whereas more bulbous toe-boxes started appearing from the 1960s onwards. Steel toes are probably an even more recent thing.

    This is my recollection of what I’ve read here and there over the internet so I might be talking nonsense. Interesting topic though it would be nice if someone with more knowledge would chime in.


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  15. deaner33

    deaner33 New in Town

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    Jackson, Mississippi
    Their profile looks really wonky. Like a copy of a copy of a copy.


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  16. bluesmandan

    bluesmandan One of the Regulars

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    From the old ad pics, the boots did not appear to have flat toes. If you find a vintage boot it will have a flat toe though, merely because it has flattened and collapsed over time. Now they are building the boot with a flat toe calling it the true/authentic/vintage style, but it’s really like buying predistressed leather imo. That isn’t how the boots looked when they were new. All the old ad pics show just a normal round toe. Not flat, not bulbous, just normal. Old pictures of people wearing the boots show the same.

    Here’s a link with some old pics.
    https://www.redwinglondon.com/blogs/red-wing-london-blog/the-history-of-the-engineer-boot


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  17. Mich486

    Mich486 Practically Family

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    718
    1950’s Sears Wearmaster Engineer boots catalogue

    [​IMG]


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  18. regius

    regius One Too Many

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    The RRL current offers? So, their problem is “out of balance”. The leather is some kind of Hidehouse chromexel-copy? It’s good leather, probably better with making jacket than real CXL, but for boots, too thin too soft & loses shape (as you can see in the photos), all that may not be an issue until you use super hard sole & midsole material. Imagine a pair of boots with soft leather on wood.


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  19. regius

    regius One Too Many

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    This photo, & many like it by other brands, all show that the strap was not long, unlike repro makers make it today. Today’s makers use a range of lasts & techniques that’s reminiscent of the 30s to 60s styles, but tend to insist on a long strap


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  20. Bfd70

    Bfd70 One Too Many

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    This thread has been dead of late.
    Ok, so I’m thinking of getting another pair for fall.
    In approximately the same price range I can get Viberg, Lofgren, or Wesco (made to my foot).
    Throw in your $.02 until i have a buck.
     

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