French cuff question

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by carldelo, Feb 1, 2014.

  1. carldelo

    carldelo One Too Many

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    In the recent cold snap, I took to wearing some French cuff shirts with the cuffs overlapped. By this I mean they were buttoned like a standard barrel cuff. It wasn't comfortable with twist back links, obviously, with the twist back on the inside of the wrist. But it worked well with some silk knots that I happen to have.

    At any rate, I like wearing the cuffs this way, and wonder if this is something that others do, or if it is a fashion don't. Not only does it keep out the cold weather, but I find regular pinched cuffs sometimes interfere with my jackets - I write at the blackboard for a living, and the sleeve often gets caught on pinched cuffs. I also prefer the understated look of silk knots to metal or enamel links.

    So, any comments are welcome.

    CD
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  2. emigran

    emigran Practically Family

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    French cuffs are very classic IMHO... I would not wear them in that fashion however.
     
  3. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

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    I don't like french cuffs and subsequently don't own any FC shirts. However, I plan on getting some in the future, and wearing them like you describe most of the time.

    I'm pretty sure that it's a faux pas, but I don't care.

    EDIT: I've been trying to find pictures of people wearing the cuffs like this for quite a while, without much luck. I would very much appreciate it if you could post some pictures. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  4. Nobert

    Nobert Practically Family

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    When I got my first pair of cufflinks (to use on a double-cuffed shirt that I had previously just rolled up at the sleeves) This was how I did it, just because I didn't know any better. It wasn't for some time that I realized you were supposed to fasten them kissing, which explained a lot vi-a-vis the dificulty in doing them up as though they were regular cuffs. Even after that, I still wore them wrong for a while, turning them under rather than over.

    The way I see it, if you don't want the teardrop shaped opening, why bother with French cuffs at all? Nothing wrong with barrel cuffs if that's what you prefer.
     
  5. carldelo

    carldelo One Too Many

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    Well, I have a number of very nice FC shirts that I've collected over the years and don't want to get rid of them. I found I wasn't wearing them because I dislike the pinched cuff effect.

    You mention that one is 'supposed to fasten them kissing', which is certainly the accepted wisdom. But maybe the only reason this is necessary is to allow one to effectively attach the links once the shirt is on. With silk knots, one generally puts the link on the cuff while the shirt is hanging. There's a slight amount of elastic give to the links, so the cuffs slide over the hands with the link in place - there is no one-handed fiddling to fasten the links, which I like. Because the knots are so small, it doesn't really matter whether they're on the inside or the outside of the cuff once they're in place.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  6. carldelo

    carldelo One Too Many

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    I may have found answers to my own question, depending on how much I decide I believe in Wikipedia:

    From the 'Cuff' entry:
    Link cuffs, which have buttonholes on both sides and are meant to be closed with cufflinks or silk knots. They are most commonly fastened in either the "kissing" style, where the insides of both sides are pressed together, or very unusually with the outer face touching the inner face, as with a button cuff (though this is unorthodox).

    From the 'Cufflink' entry:
    Cufflinks are designed only for use with shirts which have buttonholes on both sides but no buttons. These may be either single or double-length ("French") cuffs, and may be worn either "kissing," with the ends pinched together, or "barrel-style," with one end overlapping the other. The "barrel-style" was popularized by a famous 19th century entertainer and clown, Dan Rice; however, "kissing" cuffs are usually preferred.

    So I guess barrel-style is either unorthodox or clownish, or both. I'll have to think about that....
     
  7. Nobert

    Nobert Practically Family

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    A personal question that we must all confront and resolve to the satisfaction of our own inner guiding spirit in this day and age.


    If you like wearing double cuffs barrel-style go ahead an do it, say I. I wouldn't, personally, but they're not my shirts. Wear them to your own satisfaction. Wearing cufflinks at all is pretty "unorthodox" these days.
     
  8. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    I employ that cuff configuration when I want to wear a particular FC shirt with a sweater or a casual jacket that has ribbed cuffs. I've never worn it otherwise but I don't see it as a faux pas. I've tried all sorts of links with that setup and have found double button links to be the most comfortable though YMMV.


    BTW, there are two ways to join the cuffs:1. One end placed over the other end. 2. One end inserted into the fold of the other end. I prefer the later.
     
  9. carldelo

    carldelo One Too Many

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    Thanks AC, I think I'll give the nested cuffs a try. I also like the idea of double-button links, I may have a go at making myself a set. To tell the truth, this is all likely an academic-only discussion, I doubt anyone notices how I'm joining my cuffs. One of the reasons I like silk knot cufflinks is that they're so low profile.
     
  10. Mr.Astor

    Mr.Astor Banned

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    French cuffs either tuxedo or formal cut shirt, nice blue jeans single button sportcoat or double breasted, classic links, that's for me you can get in anywhere! Oh!and a nice pair of two toned loafers.
     
  11. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    You didn't even read the question, did you?
    Also your suggestions are not very good.
     
  12. cpdv

    cpdv One of the Regulars

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    LOL I must say loafers are the bane of my existence. I can not stand those things when the devil did they even become a standard item?
     
  13. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    image.jpg


    image.jpg
     
  14. cpdv

    cpdv One of the Regulars

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    The only two men I've seen who don't look like goof balls in them. It's too bad they can't make you dance as well as Gene Kelly because then I might own a pair.
     
  15. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    Loafers have been worn by stylish gents for generations.


    image.jpg
     
  16. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    I love me some butterfly loafers.


    image.jpg
     
  17. cpdv

    cpdv One of the Regulars

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    I'll let you have them! Casual day for me calls for spectator shoes or some white bucks.
     
  18. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    i started doing it for a reason; if i'm sitting at a desk trying to draw i'm constantly distracted by this little sticky out lump under my wrist if they're worn the intended way with cuff link.

    when i used to work in a vintage shop i'd regularly see European French cuff shirts on which a button had been permanently sewn, effectively sandwiching one folded side together. i own a couple of them, and did it to several of my own shirts.
     
  19. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    So it's made up like a convertible cuff (which uses a single link cuff) but with a double cuff?
     
  20. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    no, like a standard single button cuff.
     

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