How-to? Waxing cloth, a la Barbour.

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by BellyTank, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. Speedster

    Speedster Practically Family

    Messages:
    876
    Location:
    60 km west of København
    You are absolutely right. Sorry Flieger. Corrected now. Don't tell anyone ;)
     
  2. Aviakid

    Aviakid New in Town

    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    London
    James Halstead

    [QUOTE=Alan Eardley]And here he is...better late than never. At Belstaff we used to have a sophisticated waxproofing development section (his name was George Barnish) who used to spend hours experimenting with different compounds. He would then spend even more hours telling us about it during lunch breaks. Unfortunately he was so boring that we never used to listen, so I'm not sure I can be of much help. I know that what Belstaff used, which smelled like all the traditional waxproofing compounds (i.e. not Nikwax or Grangers) was based on natural wax (carnauba, I think) in suspension. Whether it was suspended in alcohol or an oil I'm not sure. I can remember that the fabric itself was (is?) made by James Halstead in Manchester (who later ownd Belstaff).

    Sorry I can't be of more help...at the moment. I'll see if I can find out more.

    Alan[/QUOTE]


    From their website: THE HISTORY OF JAMES HALSTEAD

    Forming James Halstead Ltd. in 1915, this Edwardian textile entrepreneur perhaps didn’t realise that he was laying the foundations of a family dynasty which was to pioneer many significant developments within commercial flooring in the UK and compete effectively in the global flooring market.

    The seeds of this successful British business were sown in the early part of the 20th century. Having weathered not one, but two world conflicts, it was inspired by sound vision and a family dedicated to hard work and was to grow substantially in both post war periods. However, the company didn’t start in flooring manufacture, rather as a dyeing and finishing operation which is where founder James Halstead’s expertise lay. The business, based in Whitefield near Manchester, manufactured waterproofed cotton textiles, including rubberised fabrics used to make ladies single texture rainwear.

    In just four short years the business boomed. James’ sons, John and Herbert, were so energetic that the company activities of dyeing, rubber and wax proofing soon occupied the entire factory site. In parallel with Halsteads producing waterproof cloth, Belstaff Ltd. in Staffordshire were also producing waterproof outdoor and motorcycle clothing and gaining popularity. The natural business synergy of the companies led James Halstead Ltd. to acquire the Belstaff company and brand which retained and enhanced its popularity in peacetime among motorcycle and outdoor enthusiasts.
    ---------------------
    The company now only manufactures flooring and quit textile manufacturing in 1992, another old British company with a rich & interesting history. More info on their website:
    http://www.jameshalstead.com/
     
  3. Speedster

    Speedster Practically Family

    Messages:
    876
    Location:
    60 km west of København
    BUMP to this old thread...

    BellyTank, you still around? Did you ever finalize this project?
     
  4. BellyTank

    BellyTank I'll Lock Up

    I'm here. Just too many projects researched and not completed. Been thinking about this one in tghe last week,
    or two. I have a new baby boy, too- so I'm busy enough...

    B
    T
     
  5. Speedster

    Speedster Practically Family

    Messages:
    876
    Location:
    60 km west of København
    CONGRATULATIONS on the new baby boy :eusa_clap:eusa_clap
     

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