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Lunch, Anybody?

Messages
15,572
Location
East Central Indiana
Indiana's famous Breaded Tenderloin......

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M Brown

A-List Customer
Messages
314
Location
N Tx
Fried Chicken tacos.

cut up a leftover fried chicken breast, heat in skillet with a teaspoon of oil and a heavy dash of chipoltle powder .... set aside.
heat corn tortillas, lightly buttered on each side, one at a time, in skillet until heated to your preference...they can be soft or crispy, your choice.
load the chicken into the tortillas and top with chopped lettuce, tomato, and grated cheese.
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Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,453
Location
The Barbary Coast
Years ago, I got a meat slicer. I didn't want to spend a lot, since I wasn't opening a butcher shop. Mostly plastic parts, but it did work. Thin slices of roast beef and roast pork.

You can grow tomato. I've heard of people growing them indoors, in flower pots, during the winter. Where I live, the tomato plants are still flowering and producing fruit.

I made a stir fry from leftovers. Asian greens, carrots, corn, and roast beef.

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ThankfulGirl

New in Town
Messages
35
Location
Cornwall, UK
We have tomatoes growing, @Fifty150 - it's just they're stubbornly refusing to ripen. Wretched things! They're incredibly healthy and they have tons of green fruit (they're Tumbling Toms so we grew them to cascade down the bathroom windowsill out of the way of prying kitty-paws) but so far nothing's come ripe...
Thanks for the tip re: the slicer. My brother in law has one that you can also use for bread. Home cured ham is so good you don't necessarily want thin slices, mind you!
 

Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,453
Location
The Barbary Coast
Home cured ham is so good you don't necessarily want thin slices, mind you!

That sounds like a great piece of meat. I haven't tried curing yet. I usually slow roast, and sometimes smoke when I'm not lazy. A little more work to build the fire, then monitor the temperature and continue to feed fuel. I should do it more often. Right in my neighborhood, just minutes away, is a family business which distributes mesquite, apple wood, cherry wood, oak..... they supply all of the fancy chefs in this area who have woodfired ovens in their restaurants. Since I know them, I can go there and get as much as I want.

I've never bought a tomato seed. I just buy groceries. There are always tomato seeds left on the cutting board. I scrape those seeds into yard. Not 100% success. I do get some seeds that sprout, and some sprouts make to seedling stage. Some of the seedlings become plants if animals, insects, or whatever else doesn't eliminate them. Just like in nature, when a plant has dozens of fruit, and each tomato has dozens of seeds, only a few of those seeds actually make it to become another plant producing more tomato. My tomato yield is always a surprise. I never know what type of tomato a plant will produce.

The local weather never gets under 40 degrees Fahrenheit, so there is no frost. I imagine that growing indoors is ideal because you have stable room temperature (no frost), and sunlight from windows. You could try grow lamps. Artificial lighting does wonders for people farming cannabis.

I only have outdoor plants. I have plants all year around, in different growth stages. So there is always some stage of fruit or flower. During cool weather months, I don't see flowers, but there are still green tomato sitting on the vines. I think tomato just ripen whenever they are ready. A very tricky recipe of water, sun, soil nutrients. I have plants right now which have flowers, small fruit still forming, green fruit, and only a few are ripening.
 

ThankfulGirl

New in Town
Messages
35
Location
Cornwall, UK
We have a friend who rears pigs, so we get half a pig every other quarter and off we go. We've not had as much success with bacon - it's been quite salty - but also quite a lot of joy with salamis. We did make rillettes with the scraps but I wasn't comfortable keeping them in the pantry without refrigeration. We've tried smoking, but we've done it in a barrel barbecue which was a bit underwhelming....
 

ThankfulGirl

New in Town
Messages
35
Location
Cornwall, UK
It's been easy enough to make, it's just been more of a pancetta sort of thing, which is very tasty, but it's not what you'd have on your breakfast. I've tried dry-curing and it was eye-wateringly salty.
On the other hand, the weather here in Cornwall has DEFINITELY dropped under 40 degrees, so I'm going to make some soup tonight for tomorrow's lunch - butternut squash with ginger, sage and rosemary.
 

Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,453
Location
The Barbary Coast
Ooh, I love butternut squash. I don't do anything special. Just cut it in half, scoop out the seeds, and place it in a steamer. The steam cooks and softens it very quickly. Then scoop it out and eat it. It's already so sweet.

Ginger, sage, and rosemary. You must be a wonderful cook.
 

ThankfulGirl

New in Town
Messages
35
Location
Cornwall, UK
If I can type round the big ginger cat who has also decided that autumn is a good time to be indoors, I love squash, husband is a bit this way/that way about it, and our boy actively dislikes it. (We like it roasted with sesame oil when the oven's on for the Sunday roast, too.)

Those big pumpkins you get for Halloween make me so sad. The flesh is just watery and tasteless, but they get bought cheaply to carve from supermarkets and the inside gets wasted :-( We don't do leftovers in this house. We eat them!
 

Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,453
Location
The Barbary Coast
Those big pumpkins you get for Halloween make me so sad. The flesh is just watery and tasteless,

I heard that those pumpkins are not meant for eating. Those big pumpkins were developed to be big for decorative purposes. There are small pumpkins which are sold as "pie pumpkin", which does have a sweet, edible flesh. Around here, we also get delicata and kabocha. Both are very sweet, and the entire squash is edible. Even the skin. They can be roasted in the oven. I usually use a steamer, and the pumpkin is tender and juicy.
 

ThankfulGirl

New in Town
Messages
35
Location
Cornwall, UK
You're right, they're not. But really, when there are people in the world going to bed hungry, who even uses food for decorative purposes?! (Doesn't stay in our house long enough to be decorative!) My soup is on the simmer, and my house now officially smells like autumn....
 

Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,453
Location
The Barbary Coast
I can vividly remember my last squash soup. My ex took a whole acorn squash, without cutting it open to clean out the seeds, added a can of chicken noodle soup, and boiled it. Cooking was not one of her skills.
 
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