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Mapledoram Suits on Etsy...any experiences?

lci419

Familiar Face
Messages
66
Location
Tennessee
The other day I stumbled across a UK based company on Etsy named Mapledoram. They are making suits for $357 (US) which don't "appear" to be too bad, but I was wondering if anyone has had any experiences with them. I can't find anything about them other than their Etsy listings, and naturally, I have to be suspect of anyone advertising making a period correct suit for $357.
 

PeterB

One of the Regulars
Messages
183
Location
Abu Dhabi
Hi Ici419,

I have seen the Etsy site Mapledoram. They claim that the suits are exact copies of demob suits. If this is correct, then the suits will probably be cut right. However, they do not specify what the material is. If it is light weight cloth, the suits will have the wrong feel to them. I would imagine that it is possible to copy demob suits in low cost areas for the price they list, but the margins would be fairly low. I think all you would have to do is find a factory, send them a demob suit to take apart and copy, then get them to make patterns in various sizes. Not having seen one in action (worn by someone of the right size), I can't say whether they are well made or not. The trouble is that the price is just too high to take a chance on buying one to test, even though it would be a low price for a vintage style suit. I will watch out for posts about Mapledoram.
 

PeterB

One of the Regulars
Messages
183
Location
Abu Dhabi
Vampyre Master, do you think cashmere for a suit is quite right? In my admittedly limited experience, cashmere does not crease well, and lacks strength, though it feels great and has body. Also, would demob suits have been made of cashmere? What do you think?
 

Mathematicus

A-List Customer
Messages
379
Location
Coventry, UK
I have a jacket made of wool and cachemire and has a very soft hand. Has a very good drape but definitely doesn't resemble vintage suiting, which is thicker and rougher.
 

PeterB

One of the Regulars
Messages
183
Location
Abu Dhabi
Cashmere can be a good material, but I tend to avoid it, on account of it does not wear so well, at least that is my experience. Still can't understand why someone would make a replica demob suit and sell it for a fairly low price, made of cashmere. Plenty of cheaper hard wearing material around.
 

Eddie Derbyshire

Practically Family
Messages
849
Location
Riddings, Derbyshire, UK
I have some cashmere and wool blended trousers, and in a suit. By Abraham Moon. Terrible. Crease goes right out of them, and they wore through at the crotch almost immediately. Not to say that these suits would be the same, but I personally am avoiding cashmere now. I suppose it also depends on the density of the weave and the weight of the cloth too. The suits look really nice, and it isn't a bad price for a decent repro, as you've said.
 

PeterB

One of the Regulars
Messages
183
Location
Abu Dhabi
Eddie, I don't know that you can do much with cashmere, even if the weave is right. I think it is something to do with the fibre, where you trade soft and shiny for strength and ability to hold a crease. Cashmere is good for overcoats, I suppose, where a crease is not important.
 

Mathematicus

A-List Customer
Messages
379
Location
Coventry, UK
I had a wool and cashmire overcoat I used to wear daily and I don't think it's a good material for hard-wearing. After few years it became quite evidently worn.
I suppose the softness of cashmere could show at its best only in a blazer or a sports coat; definitely not enough strong for trousers or outerwear. Not to mention sweaters, but that is a different matter.

To be honest, a decent-weight cashmere fabric will drape and wear way better than any super-shiny-polished-ultra-light-weight modern wool or synthetic.
 

Dirk Wainscotting

A-List Customer
Messages
354
Location
Irgendwo
It's not easy to get cloth that resembles that of the 40s/50s. It's not just heavier, it was denser too. Some cloth from the 50s, especially for cheaper suits, wasn't all that brilliant (there's a German tailor at the Cutter & Tailor who disparagingly calls it 'carpet').

To be authentic such repro suits would have to be available in common cloths of the time: serge, hopsack weaves, the heavier worsteds.
 

PeterB

One of the Regulars
Messages
183
Location
Abu Dhabi
Dirk,

You are right. The cloth was woven much tighter, I think, and of course was not always consistent (thick bits and thin bits here and there). I think the tailor on Cutter & Tailor is Zuschneider. He is extremely funny in what he writes, and is probably correct in calling it "carpet". Sator, on the same site, used to be very keen on thick cloth.
 

Dirk Wainscotting

A-List Customer
Messages
354
Location
Irgendwo
Is he (Sator) no longer keen? Lighter cloths have their place, but thicker cloths are now woefully underused - and less often produced.
A majority of men who wear suits nowadays wear paper-thin trousers in cold weather. They may have a coat on, usually some modern shorter-length "overcoat", which offers no protection to stop the cold penetrating the thin cloth of the trousers. It's no wonder people default to other clothes, thinking that suits are 'too thin' for winter wear.
 

PeterB

One of the Regulars
Messages
183
Location
Abu Dhabi
Dirk, I don't know what happened to Sator. I think he used to be on this forum. He was very keen on thick cloths, but then seemed to change his mind. He had good articles and posts on the Cutter and Tailor. I have found that the problem with the thin cloth is that it wrinkles quickly and loses its body unless it is gabardine or a fairly stiffly woven cloth. Nothing wrong with "carpet", and I don't fancy paying very high prices for what is, after all, just a suit. I have been buying heavier weights lately, and found that some of them are quite loosely woven, so will be good even in warmer temperatures. People here in Abu Dhabi think that thin cloth will be more suitable, but it wears out easily in the jacket cuffs, the top of the collar and the seat. Perspiration is a problem and will ruin thin cloth, even the good stuff. The thicker, lower quality cloths, on the other hand, survive well. I have a tweed suit that I have been wearing for the last 20 years here, without a problem.
 

Gary ferris

New in Town
Messages
1
Ladies and gents I am the owner of mapledoram and all you have said and discussed is true. The suits would not be made out of cashmere and they would thicker, denser and coarser material . However the suits are exact quality copies apart from the material and i have priced the product to sell. If you require feedback , please look at the company Facebook page and see what customers say. Alternatively instead of speculating go straight to the horses mouth and use the contact form on the company web page to message .
I am happy to answer any questions you may have.
Thank you
 

Mathematicus

A-List Customer
Messages
379
Location
Coventry, UK
Yeah, that's the thing, too fragile for me. If they'd noved on to something more robust....
I would say the problem is more with crazy wrinkling. Thinner material made of cachemire takes creases quite easily; the best quality cachemire suitings will last long but they will wrinkle every time they are worn (although if the material is really good these wrinkles should go away with some hanging).
Heavy cachemire coating does not have these problems, but it is bulky.
 

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