Old sayings, which make no sense?

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Trenchfriend, Mar 25, 2021.

  1. Turnip

    Turnip One Too Many

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    Who can do boozing, could also go working.

    Most heard saying during junior high and apprenticeship for pals and me...:D
     
  2. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

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    I remember all those over here in England too. I wonder what modern kids would make of them?
     
  3. LostInTyme

    LostInTyme New in Town

    StevieBoy1: I think the instructions were universal, given out with each marriage license, back in the 20th century.
     
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  4. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I know a lot of young parents. You'd be surprised how many of these are still in use today.

    "Don't play in the sewer, you'll get hydrophobia" was a common one in my neighborhood when I was small, but there are no longer any children living in that neighborhood, and they finally closed over the sewer, so I guess that one, at least, is finally irrelevant.
     
  5. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    The classic A & O. Or "the root of the matter."

    I had no idea until today, that it just means the Alpha and Omega.
     
  6. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    My mom would tell me that eating too many sweets would cause diabetes. Marrying a nurse practitioner, whose family has more than its fair share of diabetics, taught me how ridiculous that was.
     
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  7. LostInTyme

    LostInTyme New in Town

    "If you eat that, you'll get worms." (the Mom talking to the Dad in Christmas Story about tasting the Christmas turkey before it was completely done cooking)
     
  8. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    I heard each one of these very regularly, except for 'wait til your dad gets home"....Dad died so that was never an option for mom....she was 5' nothing and I a big kid so the wooden spoon did not work so she accelerated the arms race moving up to a broom. Once I brought a box to the table and when mother asked what it was for I replied is was to put my veggies for the kids in China. I was still young enough to experience the wooden spoon not the broom of latter years.
     
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  9. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    My mother's weapon of choice was a Sherwin-Williams wooden paint stirrer, on which she had written in ball-point pen, "Patty's Punishment Paddle." She kept it in the drawer next to her kitchen chair, and when you heard that drawer skreeking open, that was your cue to scram. Until the day she broke it on my brother, and started using a soup ladle. That one she broke on me -- the bowl spun off and flew across the room, which I thought was pretty funny at the time.

    Ma came by it naturally. The bathroom door at my grandparents' house had a big crack in it. That was the result of my grandfather throwing a can of sardines at my mother when she was about twelve years old because she'd called him the "F" word. She had picked it up at school and knew she wasn't supposed to say it and so she did. One of those cute family stories we always laughed over in later years around the Thanksgiving table.
     
  10. STEVIEBOY1

    STEVIEBOY1 Practically Family

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    Imagine if any of that was to happen these days.??
     
  11. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    She can't even imagine it herself. "What was wrong with me?" she says with a slow shake of her head.
     
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  12. Turnip

    Turnip One Too Many

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    To make sense makes no sense when transferred literally to German.
     
  13. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

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    Western Reserve (Cleveland)
    More of a definition, really.

    Something I fail to understand is, as a definition for "altogether" how does one get to "the state of having no clothes on"?
     

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