So trivial, yet it really ticks you off.

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by GHT, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,509
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    Out Seattle way but not here in greater Denver I’ve seen rear window decals memorializing a departed loved one, often a young person gone way too soon.

    These people are in terrible pain. They’ve lost a kid and they carry that loss with them everywhere.

    We don’t wear black armbands these days. But we festoon signposts and decal the back windows on our minivans. Eventually those plastic flowers and candles and whatnot deteriorate away to nothing. And cars get worn out. And the survivors may not ever quite get over their loss, but they get used to it.
     
  2. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

    Messages:
    659
    Location:
    Western Reserve (Cleveland)
    The term for a roadside memorial is descanso
     
  3. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,509
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    Montana is a favorite destination for the dewy-eyed bride and me. We’ve been several times.

    She once observed that Montanans evidently preferred little white crosses alongside the road over guard rails.
     
    Just Jim likes this.
  4. earl

    earl One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    Been to Montana once some 4 decades ago to go downhill skiing at Big Sky. Beautiful country but would never live there due to their winter temps. Was there in February and the days I skied it was -39F without the wind factored in. Looking back on it I marvel how I handled that temp as now I can't hack it where I live in Kansas whenever it fall below 45.:p
     
  5. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    Around here it's "Memorial de los Pendejos".
     
  6. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    Cheapeake Bay Drainage Basin
     
  7. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,509
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    Another traffic fatality, yesterday evening, the sole occupant of a vehicle that collided with a light pole right by my “regular” supermarket, 2.2 miles from here via the leisurely, more roundabout route I typically take.

    Excessive speed is thought to be a contributing factor.
     
  8. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,058
    Location:
    New Forest
    Driving my wife's car today, I saw a motorist about to exit a garage, he looked as though he hadn't seen me, but I had the situation weighed up. At the last second the motorist saw me and instead of continuing as I had expected him to, he froze. Nothing was coming in the opposite direction so I took evasive action. The car's onboard computer absolutely freaked out. The noise from the alarm sounded like a ship's fog horn, the brakes came on, the seat belt locked up and the computer screen lit up with the message: "Risk of Collision." Risk of collision, seriously? More like risk of bowel evacuation.
     
  9. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    This is the very reason I am so against the latest technologies in "auto safety", including the self-driving vehicles. Not because of the shock value when the alarms sound off, but because I don't want some p.o.s. computer program preventing me from controlling the vehicle.
     
    belfastboy likes this.
  10. Haversack

    Haversack One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,093
    Location:
    Clipperton Island
    Back in the late '60s our family took a long vacation to visit family friends in western Montana. Driving there, we immediately noticed the small roadside crosses where traffic fatalities had occurred. (My dad, being a highway safety engineer, took a professional interest.) One I particularly remember was at a slight bend in the two-lane road with a large tree on the outside curve. There must have a dozen crosses of different vintages scattered about it.

    In southern Germany stone roadside memorials, (some dating back centuries), are pretty common. They usually memorialize some fatality. In remote areas this was commonly murder by bandits. The ones on exposed hillsides were for usually for lightning strikes. The later continue to serve as a useful reminder to avoid such places during the rain.
     
    tonyb likes this.
  11. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,509
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    I think I could listen for hours to a highway safety engineer riff on what makes for safer and less-safe roads. I suspect that their work over the decades has played no small part in the decline of traffic fatalities.
     
    Haversack and Zombie_61 like this.
  12. Haversack

    Haversack One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,093
    Location:
    Clipperton Island
    My dad began working for the State Division of Highways here in California back before it became Caltrans and eventually had all the state highway fatal accident reports come across his desk. He didn't talk much about that but he had definite views on certain makes and models of cars. He always had his camera ready when the family went on vacation. I can't count the times he would pull over so he could take a photo of a different design of guardrail, especially when we went out of state. He took me with him a few times over to the Highway Patrol Academy in West Sacramento to watch a crash test of different types of impact barrier: Water tubes, sand barrels, expanded metal. He had a hand in their design. Water tubes I remember were expensive but reusable while sand barrels were cheap and expendable.
     
    Zombie_61 likes this.
  13. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,270
    Location:
    Germany
    The good point on (you call it) pretzel sticks:
    They're still GREAT and maybe the best snacky, you can get.

    The bad point on pretzel sticks:
    Your lap can look like Berlin '45.
     
  14. Nobert

    Nobert Practically Family

    Messages:
    824
    Location:
    In the Maine Woods
    Why, oh why, I thought re-stretching chair canvass would be as straightforward as the article in Better Homes & Gardens made it look is one of those I-should-know-better-but-keep-hoping-anyway annoyances. For one thing, these D.I.Y. articles often suggest that you enlist the help of a friend, which I find wildly presumptuous on their part, and they assume that nothing unforeseen will spring up, or in this case, not spring down as much as one would like.
     
  15. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,509
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    ^^^^
    Nothin’ to it (on the hundredth attempt).
     
    Nobert and Zombie_61 like this.
  16. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,058
    Location:
    New Forest
    That acronym DIY? You might believe it means Do It Yourself. No it doesn't as your chair canvass re-stretching clearly demonstrates. It means Don't Involve Yourself, which is why I use professionals.
     
    Benny Holiday and Zombie_61 like this.
  17. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

    Messages:
    659
    Location:
    Western Reserve (Cleveland)
    Aahh, now THAT makes perfect sense, and it's true in every conceivable way.

    Actually with regard to do it yourself, stores like Home Depot, Lowes etc., are DIY stores in the truest sense, because that what you have to do when you shop there because there's NEVER anybody around to help you. The last time I went to Home depot it was amusingly obvious seeing the few employees I did see ealking around trying not to be noticed.
     
    Just Jim likes this.
  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I reupholstered an entire couch once from a magazine article. "Once" being the operative word.

    The thing is, though, that "DIY" is very often the only possible way to get something done nowadays, especially if you are surrounded by old things that you want to keep using. American consumer society is built on the foundation of you not doing that, and if you can't afford to hire someone to fix your old couch, your old TV, your old stove, or your old whatever, and you live in a town where there is no one you can hire to do these things -- you have no choice but to do it yourself, and if you don't know how to do it yourself, you have no choice but to learn. The Boys are confident in their belief that most people either don't care enough to do that or don't think that they can.

    Just remember, every time you pick up a screwdriver, it's an act of revolution.
     
    Nobert likes this.
  19. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,509
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    I’ve known a couple of people who learned how to upholster — my dear old Ma, who was forever repairing the cigarette burns the Old Man put in the furniture (it’s a wonder he didn’t burn the house down, always falling asleep with a lit cigarette in his hand, or mouth); and a car-restoring uncle, who figured, accurately, that he could, with practice, redo those auto interiors himself.

    It’s not just the planned obsolescence of consumer goods that has so few of us repairing our stuff these days, and it’s not just marketing efforts that have us thinking we need the newest and greatest model long before the one we have has lived a life, although those are factors in this toss-it-don’t-fix-it world of ours.

    We’re highly specialized these days. And we put in long hours at whatever specialized task we perform. (Somehow that increased leisure the advances in technology would bring us has yet to come to pass.)

    I recall an old-school hardware store proprietor once telling me that his best employees were farm boys, because they knew how to address most every problem the customers threw at them. But that’s been some decades ago now. Farming as well is much more specialized than it was then.
     
    Nobert likes this.
  20. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,005
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    The reverse could also be true in some cases.....wasn't it in Denmark where they discovered eliminating 4 way stops radically decreased accidents at those intersections? People realized it was uncontrolled so became more alert rather than driving on human auto pilot. What other areas could this be applied to I wonder?
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.