So trivial, yet it really ticks you off.

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by GHT, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    When pizza became popular in New England in the late 1930s, anchovies were the dominant topping. You'd be hard pressed today to find anyone who has ever seen an anchovy, let alone put one on a pizza. "Anchovy Pizza" was still common into the '70s, but only old people ate it, and with the domination of the market by chain pizza, it's all but extinct now.
     
    MisterCairo and Trenchfriend like this.
  2. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,777
    Location:
    Germany
    Fish products itself have become an uncommon thing in old Germany, in general. But luckily not in supermarket!

    But my thing is to make me a frozen pizza and add a can of Kieler Sprats on top. :)
     
  3. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,064
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    The pie's Hawaiian provenance is obscured by History and writ in the legend and lore of
    the Islands; however, King Kamehameha's famed Law of The Splintered Paddle, 1782
    'Ke Kanawai Mamalahoe,' suffices ad proximum antecedens fiat relatio; brief relates how
    Kamehameha was struck across the face by a pizza paddle while attempting to enforce vagrancy
    prohibition against a surfer party rumored to have Kaneohe Beach locus.

    The reach of provenance though finds Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment
    ex antecedentibus fit optima interpretation inasmuch as the pizza chowhound "Wolfhounds"
    exercised personal initiative typical of the 11Bravo :cool: and bastardized matters even more,
    improving the basic pie and adapting the indigenous product to New York City exactitude recipe,
    mixed of course with the home grown surfer style slice.
    Schofield Barracks imprimatur, nihil obstat. Second World War circa.
    No acey deucy wild; only strait stud poker pizza pie dealt Schofield.

    This pizza dates and rates Chatham, Ontario pizza. :D
    ...and no appellate recourse either. Forget it, ain't even gonna happen.;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
  4. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,879
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    My memories of anchovy pizzas are limited and quite distant, so it is not unlikely that those recollections would be unrepresentative of the species over all.

    But damn, those things were SALTY! I’ve always had a healthy appetite and have never been a picky eater, but if other anchovy pizzas are as salty as the ones I remember, well, I’ll wait ‘til I get home and make a peanut butter sandwich.
     
  5. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

    Messages:
    787
    Location:
    Western Reserve (Cleveland)
    That's interesting. As a kid in the 70s "no anchovies" was the knee jerk reaction to the topic of ordering a pizza. I actually had a pizza with anchovies once and though I didn't find it overly objectionable I was at a loss to understand the appeal. Might as well have put tuna fish on it, it tasted like it anyway. Definitely not an improvement on the concept of pizza.

    When my mom ordered a pizza she would order "a large cheese pizza with mozzarella." Not sure why she felt she needed to specify the cheese as I don't remember any other being an option.
     
    MisterCairo likes this.
  6. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Thirties pizza, at least around New England, was sometimes called "Pizza (hot tomato pie)" or "Italian tomato pie," in the same manner as we call a sandwich served on a long roll an "Italian Sandwich," and from the recipes I've seen cheese wasn't as much a part of it as the pizza seen today, certainly not the dripping gobs of mozzarella you get now. More often the recipes specified Parmesan -- sometimes called "Italian cheese," because it was pretty much the only kind of Italian cheese known to non-Italian people, or people not living near Italian neighborhoods. The crust was very thin and very crisp

    Out of curiosity I once did some research on the spread of pizza in Maine, and found that became very popular around 1936-37 in the city of Lewiston -- a city which was, and still is, dominated by Franco-Americans, with scarcely an Italian neighborhood to be found. Go figure.
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  7. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,358
    Location:
    New Forest
    We call that same long roll by it's French name, a baguette. Or at least we did until Peter Buck & Fred DeLuca exported their franchise from Connecticut, across the pond, to Europe. Now it's a Sub. No it is not, it's a sandwich, named after the compulsive gambler, The Earl of Sandwich. He didn't want to leave the gaming table, but he didn't want his playing cards to get soiled either, so he ordered meat between two slices of bread to be served to him at the gaming tables. Others saw this and said: "I'll have a Sandwich."
     
  8. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    Replace the A-1 with a little mayo and a lot of yellow mustard, and I agree. Also, fresh ingredients always make a better burger.
     
  9. tmal

    tmal One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    112
    Location:
    NYS
    Being as I from PA, but lived 14 years in VT and NH it is my considered opinion that New Englanders it eat weird s**t. Anchovies? Really? why not just ask for a pound of salt? The proper pizza is NY style (thin crust) with lots of mozzarella, pepperoni and/or sausage, well seasoned, and not an anchovie or pineapple in sight. IMHO.
     
    MisterCairo likes this.
  10. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

    Messages:
    857
    Location:
    Cheapeake Bay Drainage Basin
    A little etymology: The sandwich made with an Italian-style loaf of bread was created as the "submarine sandwich" by the likeness of the long and relatively smaller diameter to the naval craft.

    Since we can't be bothered with using five syllables where one will do, it got shortened to "sub".

    Now in Pennsylvania, such a sandwich is (or was, it's been 50 years since I left my hometown, so I can't vouch for current usage) called a hoagie. Don't ask me where that came from.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
    tonyb and MisterCairo like this.
  11. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,777
    Location:
    Germany
    Sell "Groundmeat Brötchen" (with or without onions) in the US. Would surely "sell as hell". :D
     
    MisterCairo likes this.
  12. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,777
    Location:
    Germany
    Leaving a pizza carton in a public waste can, ok.

    But with the leftover rinds in (visible from the side)??
     
    tonyb likes this.
  13. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,011
    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest
    I cringe at any reference to pizza as "a pie" or "pie." Mr. La Motta concurs.

    upload_2021-1-9_9-13-40.png
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  14. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,011
    Location:
    The Great Pacific Northwest
    And this debate is as likely to be resolved as the issues raised during the Reformation. Tavern cut vs. wedge cut?

    upload_2021-1-9_9-18-56.png
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  15. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

    Messages:
    787
    Location:
    Western Reserve (Cleveland)
    Never had wedge cut until I moved to the mid west. Always tavern cut (they call it something different here but I can't remember, square cut maybe).
     
  16. Hercule

    Hercule Practically Family

    Messages:
    787
    Location:
    Western Reserve (Cleveland)
    Sorry, but I'll take Dean Martin over you and Mr. LaMotta (whoever he is) all day and every day when it comes to pizza pie.
     
    ChiTownScion likes this.
  17. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    "Pizza Pie" was a common construction in the Northeast from the thirties onwards. Phil Rizzuto, a Brooklyn Italian to his roots, when broadcasting Yankee games in the 60s and 70s used to expound frequently on the virtues of a good "pizza pie." It started to fade out with the passing of that particular generation, and you don't much hear it any more.

    My grandfather, whose family spent time in an Italian-influenced area of Massachusetts in the late 19th Century, called it "piece-a." A porch, however, he called a "piazza," so there might have been some confusion there.

    As for cutting methods, is there anywhere but Boston where pizza is cut from big rectangular sheets with what appears to be a pair of tinsnips?
     
    Trenchfriend likes this.
  18. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,064
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    A hoagie? Ya gotta be kiddin. A hoagie is a M-60 machine gun. Grunt lingo.

    At Michigan State, a sub is a Grinder. Don't ask me where that came from.;)

    Last nite, I surfed several of The Federalist Papers essays, #65; #66; #67
    and reading Levinson's commentary-Blackstone he isn't-and feeling like
    a One-L again, a kid; and, well I recalled a British actress, Sue Lloyd
    from The Baron television series way back when...gorgeous gal, and,
    decided to check out her loveliness and found several photos from
    the series. Cupid's dart hit me at point blank range-again. So I opted
    to return to the Federalist Papers but a Microsoft alert locked the
    computer. Picked up a bug visiting Sue. Then spent an hour on the
    phone with a wise and patient Microsoft tech who excised this
    miserable mosquito. My own damn fault but a worthwhile endeavor.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2021
  19. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,879
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    All the talk of the beauty of Seattle (entirely defensible, much of it) doesn’t change what any person who had lived there for much time at all knows: the place is rat infested — mostly Norway rats, but also black rats, aka roof rats.

    This can be attributed to an amenable climate; thick, lush vegetation, which makes for great cover (what the exterminators call “harborage”); and humans feeding the damn things, garbage, in large part.

    Those of us who were out and about more at night than during daylight hours can tell of seeing entire extended families of rats in and on and around garbage cans and dumpsters, and seeing them scatter when they got caught in the headlights.
     
    LizzieMaine and Turnip like this.
  20. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    "Wharf rats" used to be a lot more visible in waterfront towns up here than they are now -- no doubt they're being priced out and forced to move inland by a species even more invasive than they are, Realtorus Northeasternus.

    My poor mother will never forget the day a wharf rat got into our sewer pipes and poked his snout up out of the toilet just as she was about to commence business. Just another day in the old neighborhood.
     
    tonyb and Turnip like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.