Terms Which Have Disappeared

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by KILO NOVEMBER, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. Stormy

    Stormy A-List Customer

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    Hm ... growing up, I was told a tale about the origin of the term "honky" that is (most likely) not the same as what LizzyMaine claims
     
  2. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    Would that account be suitable for a family-friendly (hah!) forum such as this?

    If so, well, enquiring minds want to know.
     
  3. Stormy

    Stormy A-List Customer

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    Not all that bad but pretty darn racist
     
  4. Miss Moonlight

    Miss Moonlight A-List Customer

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    No one seems to say presently when they mean soon. Which is understandable, as it sounds like a word for immediately. ha.

    Also, I don't hear people say Fair to middlin for okay - that one comes from my mom who was born in Missouri in 1946 but moved to So Cal at about age 10. She used it throughout my childhood, but I haven't heard it from her (or anyone) in the last couple decades.
     
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  5. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Fair to middlin is still used, by and large, by the older generations here. It's a lighthearted response to: "How's you?"
    Can't say that I've heard, "Cat caught your tongue," in a while.
     
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  6. tonyb

    tonyb Vendor

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    ^^^^^
    Either of those phrases as spoken by people younger than 80 (at least) would likely sound affected to my ears.

    Which I to say I heard those phrases uttered by people my grandparents’ ages, and people of their era are almost entirely gone now. The youngest were born well more than a century ago.
     
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  7. The Jackal

    The Jackal One of the Regulars

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    This one is very situational. I'd say that I still hear it pretty regular when the occasion calls for something of the sort. I don't hear it often, but I attribute that solely to rarity of the circumstances in which it would be said.
     
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  8. Paradoxical

    Paradoxical New in Town

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    I say it to our Siamese cat every now and then. Siamese cats are usually very vocal... but not this one. My wife and I also use it with our granddaughters when the situation calls for it.
     
  9. skydog757

    skydog757 A-List Customer

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    One phrase that I have not heard in the last 15 years or so is something needing "a woman's touch"; meaning needing the input of feminine style or taste. Most likely due to the blatant sexism that it implies in this day and age.

    Also, I don't hear "People will talk" or "Let 'em talk" referring to doing something that can be perceived as inappropriate or scandalous. People tweet, post, blog, etc.; they seldom just talk anymore.
     
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  10. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I've always understood the show-biz application of the word "drop" to mean "discontinue" or "cancel," as in "NBC Drops Two From Saturday Lineup" But now, it has apparently changed to mean precisely the opposite: to release, not cancel -- "Hulu Drops Two New Shows Tonight"

    Since when? And why?
     
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  11. The Jackal

    The Jackal One of the Regulars

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    Its one of those weird things where it means 2 completely different things depending on the context, and both are still pretty commonly used.

    Most recently, Taylor Swift dropped a new album, but many theatres dropped the newest Xmen movie. Taylor Swift released a new album, but the theatres removed the movie. Same word, opposite meaning. English is a fun language.
     
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  12. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    The English language is plain wacky. You can completely change the meaning of the sentence "She loved him." depending on where you place the word "only."
     
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  13. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    You don't hear: "A picture is worth a thousand words," said very much at all. It might still be used at training sessions for would be sales people. It's where I came across it. I started out working for a large conglomerate, as part of my management training program I was put to work in various departments.

    In forums like this, social media and comments sections, the written word is just that, it has no nuance, eye contact, body language. Wherever I can, I will emphasise a post with a picture, it goes a long way and helps avoid the unintentional spat.

    In the UK we used to use the term: "Penny wise, pound foolish," for a spendthrift. I guess it's not an expression that lends itself to other currencies. Has anyone heard the saying: "A penny saved, is a penny earned?"
     
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  14. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Yes, have heard and used all of them.
     
  15. KILO NOVEMBER

    KILO NOVEMBER Practically Family

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    latinum adducite or adducite latinum

    With case endings, word order is conventional, but not dispositive.

    In spoken English (it's the only one I know, but I imagine it's so in others) word order takes second place to vocal emphasis. Take this sentence, for example, "What did he give her?" Now, say it out loud five times, changing the emphasis from one word to the next with each repetition. Each version is very different, but the word order, subject, object, indirect object, verb, all the same.
     
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  16. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    In rebuttal to "A picture is worth a thousand words," writers used to say "Draw me a picture of the Gettysburg Address."
     
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  17. Upgrade

    Upgrade One of the Regulars

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    Technically a picture of Lincoln giving the Getty’s bird a dress does exist.

    As I recall, it came from the old Photoshop contest site, Worth1000, coincidently enough.
     

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  18. The Jackal

    The Jackal One of the Regulars

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    that's funnier than it should be
     
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  19. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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    Lincoln at the time believed that his remarks had fallen flat compared to those of the keynote speaker, Edward Everett .

    Everett saw it differently: "I should be glad if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes."
     
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  20. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    [​IMG]
     
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