The Era -- Day By Day

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by LizzieMaine, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    Something to watch out for the color "nutria":eek:
     
  2. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    I agree this way of delivering a message would've been better, thankfully one can still dream.
     
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    26 (2).png
    Nice to see an aviatrix in battle and fearless. The comics definitely had more room to maneuver than the movies in 1940.

    You can tell Chicago was a cold city as the paper is chockablock with coats for sale.
     
  4. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    355,214 Brooklyn men between the ages of 21 and 35 were among those filling in Selective Service cards yesterday as registration began for America's first peacetime draft. The local men were among 16,000,000 young men nationwide who will provide the pool for an expanded Army of 5,000,000 men to be drafted over the next five years.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_.jpg

    ("I hadda stanninline fa' t'ree houahs!" exclaims Joe. "T'ree houahs! An'ney dinneven pay fa lunch." "Tol'ya yashuddapack'ta sanwidge." says Sally, examining the registration card. "Ahhh, itwun'sobad," Joe replies. "I haddem pickles I brung f'm woik. Hey, I sol' one of 'em to a guy fa haffabuck." "Waw profiteeah," frowns Sally.")

    Meanwhile, Governor Herbert H. Lehman announced the appointment of local Selective Service Boards who will oversee the draft process, with 280 boards appointed to serve designated districts in New York City. 101 such boards have been established in Brooklyn, with three local residents appointed to serve on each board. One hundred and forty seven draft boards will serve in Queens.

    Under present plans, approximately one third of all men registered will be called to active military service for a period not to exceed one year, with groups of men to be drafted in intervals between this year and 1945. The first draft notifications are expected to go out in early November, possibly as early as November 2nd.

    The chairman of the law committee of the Kings County Republican Party claimed today that up to five percent of the record-breaking 1,196,348 Brooklyn voters enrolled for the 1940 election are "illegally or improperly" registered. In an exclusive statement to the Brooklyn Eagle, A. David Benjamin declared that due to "a large number of complaints" received from "certain districts," a large staff of volunteer workers is being assembled to undertake an exhaustive investigation. "Wherever we find that the law was violated," said Mr. Benjamin, "it is the law committee's intention to ask the court to expunge the names of those illegally or improperly registered, or to prepare challenge lists to challenge the votes of such individuals on Election Day." In his statement, Benjamin contended that the most frequent violation was the failure of registrars to demand the presentation of naturalization papers, but also claimed that "persons were registered from institutions dependent on public funds or public charities." Mr. Benjamin further asserted that "Democratic politicians" were "in a number of instances" responsible for encouraging such registrations.

    Demands by Father Edward Lodge Curran for the revocation of the medical license of Dr. Louis Duke, accused abortionist, have led to a hearing before the State Medical Grievance Board -- a hearing conducted over the objections of Assistant Attorney General John H. Amen. In objecting to the hearing, Mr. Amen declared that expulsion of the Bedford Avenue physician from the medical profession at this time would interfere with his investigation of former Assistant Attorney General Sol Ullman, former chief legal counsel to the Grievance Board by eliminating his access to certain documents he intends to present in the disbarrment case now pending against Ullman. Father Curran, president of the International Catholic Truth Society, cited Dr. Duke's own testimony in the impeachment trial of Judge George Martin that he had bribed Judge Martin to the tune of $1000 to dismiss an abortion charge against him as justifying the revocation of his medical license.

    Fifteen Brooklyn grandmothers between the ages of 60 and 90 romped and frolicked at the World's Fair yesterday under the auspices of the "Grandma's Night Out Club." The ladies joined with 100,000 children, admitted to the Fair to take advantage of the Selective Service Registration Day holiday, in setting a new weekday record for attendance during the 1940 season, with a total of 189,281 paid admissions. Fair officials say despite the huge crowd there were no reports of vandalism.

    Also at the Fair, President Harvey D. Gibson was on hand at the Borden exhibit to decorate Elsie The Cow for "Distinguished Service" to the exposition, and to preside over the christening of her new calf, who will be known as "Beulah." 750 Borden employees were on hand to witness the ceremony.

    American women must stop playing bridge and instead have more children if democracy is to be preserved. So contended Dr. Ignatius Taubeneck of New York University and the Bronxville Community Forum in a speech yesterday to the 700 delegates attending the fall conference of the Long Island District of the New York State Congress of Parents and Teachers. Dr. Taubeneck condemned bridge as "a fascist game" that does not allow "one to think or even talk," and offers benefits that are "in a national sense, negative." "If fascism ever wins out in this country," insisted Dr. Taubeneck, "our incessant bridge playing will have conditioned us to accept it."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(1).jpg
    (7 1/2 cents a loaf. How 'bout that, Bond, Wonder, and Taystee?)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(2).jpg
    (Yeah, but this is page 9. And I've never noticed Wonder to have a particular "wheaty" flavor. In fact, it's never had much of a flavor at all, that's what makes it such a good bread for sandwiches. You taste the filling, not the bread.)

    Two cowboys beat a British sailor to death in a Manhattan hotel room last night, after the seaman allegedly made "indecent proposals" to them. William Hancock and Larry Finley of Dubois, Wyoming admitted to the slaying of 37-year-old Joseph Martin, a crewman of the British superliner Queen Elizabeth during a midnight celebration in a room at the Hotel Belevedere. The two cowboys are part of the 15th Annual Championship Rodeo, now appearing at Madison Square Garden, and were involved in a series of "cowboy drinking parties" going on last night at the hotel. Martin's body was found in a 14th floor corridor of the hotel, and police followed a trail of blood back to Room 1508, where the murder occured.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(3).jpg
    (Well, this is a step down from the likes of Cab Calloway. Tommy Tucker led what was called a "mickey mouse band," a corn-oriented dance orchestra with plodding arrangements accented by cutesy tricks -- slurpy saxes, clip-clopping drums, electric guitar glissandos, and a heavy diet of novelty tunes to fit the style. Benny Fields is an old-time vaudevillian who used to work in a double act with his wife Blossom Seely, but she retired a few years ago and he's working solo now, doing a nostalgia-oriented bit designed to give Ma and Pa a taste of the good old days of 1905. He is not a blackface minstrel -- he's more an ancestor of the crooner. But I think I'll save my twenty cents and see who's coming next week.)

    The Eagle Editorialist praises President Roosevelt for signing the Sugar Control Bill into law, an act which will "save the Brooklyn sugar industry." "Today there is rejoicing among the thousands of refinery employees and their families, in the retail stores that depend on their trade, and in all the allied industries whose prosperity is in part dependent on the continuance of the refineries here." The new law will save locally-produced sugar from the "murderous competition which a flood of cheap imported sugar, due to the shockingly low wage scales on the islands, would bring upon us."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(4).jpg
    (Ha ha ha, our brave boys will soon be crawling with lice.)

    The big question in sports is what conscription will mean for professional athletics, with Uncle Sam preparing to draft the "greatest team ever." Among the front-rank baseball stars registering yesterday are Paul Derringer of the World Champion Cincinnati Reds, Hank Greenberg, star of the American League champion Detroit Tigers, Bob Feller of the Cleveland Indians, Harry Danning of the Giants, and manager-shortstop Joe Cronin of the Red Sox. And, of course, Cookie Lavagetto and Pee Wee Reese of the Dodgers -- who, as young unmarried men, could face early conscription. In football, the entire squad of the Football Giants showed up yesterday to register en masse. In golf, amateur champion Lawson Little and PGA king Byron Nelson were spotted filling in the little white cards. And in boxing, Joe Louis, Max Baer and Billy Conn are all signed up and ready, as always, to fight.

    Eddie Cantor, back on the air this month for a new sponsor after an eighteen month layoff, says radio comedy, 1940 edition, is at a higher quality than at any time in radio's history. Cantor goes back to the carbon-microphone days, and sees the biggest evolution in laugh material as the move away from simple jokes, puns, and wheezes toward the situational-comedy style pioneered by Jack Benny and now being used by virtually all of the successful air comedians. Cantor also observes that comedians don't play to studio audiences as obviously as they used to -- a trait he himself was accused of for many seasons -- noting that the comics who did so, and couldn't adapt, are now off the air. Cantor is also very pleased with his new announcer Harry Von Zell, whom he calls "unquestionably the greatest announcer-actor-comedian in the business." (This must come as news to Cantor's longtime announcer Jimmy Wallington, who is now working for Fred Allen.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(5).jpg (Where's that poor turtle now? He hasn't got a chance.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(6).jpg (This is why lodges have gone out of style.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(7).jpg (SIC 'EM BILL!)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(8).jpg
    (Unknown to the world at large, the Fazian Ministry of Science has perfected the art of cloning, and has employed it to build up their Air Force. Didn't quite work with the Leader though, the proportions are a bit off.)
     
  5. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And in the Daily News...

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_.jpg "The Top Hat and Dress Suit Robber" is a pretty neat super-villian concept, but I think he could come up with a punchier name.

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(1).jpg
    Psst -- this is actually a 1940 model. Consumers Union says it's a fine radio for the price, but it's not by any means a 1941 model. And that changer will be kinda rough on your records, so you better take advantage of that sale and stock up.

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(2).jpg
    I kinda feel bad for those two Willkie voters at Cook and Morrell Streets.

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(3).jpg "Good Heavens!!!"

    _Thu__Oct_17__1940_.jpg Ultimate Plot Twist -- she isn't Billy's mother at all. She's Annie's. (And Nick was her real dad. THINK ABOUT IT.)

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(4).jpg Here, Uncle -- have a cigar to seal the bargain!

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(5).jpg
    Behind Wump's bland expressionless gaze lies the mind of a master troll.

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(6).jpg
    You're letting him *walk* out? Creampuff.

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(7).jpg Well, this should be entertaining.

    Daily_News_Thu__Oct_17__1940_(8).jpg Seems Mamie has one of those new 1940 model corsets, for the "uplift silhouette."
     
  6. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I filled out one of those cards at the local post office in the early '80s. Even knowing there was very little chance of the draft coming back, the physical process of going there, filling in the form and handing it in still jarred you a bit; hence, I can only guess at what these boys had to be feeling.


    "Waw profiteeah" good timely humor from Sally. And she was spot on as Joe sold that one pickle for, in 2020 dollars, ~$9! He should have gone back with a folding table and opened a stand.


    Somebody at NYU needs to pull Dr. Igatius Taubeneck aside and have a serious discussion with him.


    Hopefully, our friend is using the rabbit distraction to make a slow getaway.


    There's a special place in Hell for those who kick dogs.


    I'm not saying she isn't making a colossal mistake, but you do have to respect Miss Barrett for actually following through on her pledge to wait and marry him when he gets out. Wow, that's dedication.


    With the discount, that costs about $2300 in 2020 dollars. About five years ago, we bought a brand new (not last year's model, if Sonos even has model years) Sonos sound "system," which, effectively, does a lot more than the Victrola, for about (from memory) $1200. That said, I'll bet the sound from the RCA is richer in ways.


    I'm up for it if it brings Nick back or at least his world as anything is better than jokes about the broom doing more work than the sweeper. I really want to know what happened that caused Gray to convert his strip from sharp social commentary and layered stories about the sinews of power, to this wholesome fluff? He's gotta be dying a bit inside everyday he writes this new material.


    I know we've talked about it before, but just as the only way to appreciate "Dan Dunn" is to see it as Opera, the only way to appreciate "The Gumps" is to see it as a throwback to the Romantic Period in literature. Both strips make perfect sense when I read them from those respective perspectives; otherwise, they seem silly and juvenile.


    "I'll tell you what, take this one [pointing to the DL], if you're happy with her, I'll send you the other one, but either way, we're all squared, right?"

    The DL will have Chopstick Joe working for her, or he'll be dead, in a day or two.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2020
  7. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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    Yes, Chicago still is a cold city. A coat that reaches to one's knees is a must for both men and woman in order to keep warm, especially when wating for the bus or subway.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2020
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  8. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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  9. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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  10. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

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  11. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Martha Washington Candies - was she known for candy, did I miss this historical tidbit?


    Maling Brothers Hosiery - the scale is a bit off on her legs versus her torso.


    The new '41 Philco costs about half what the Davega RCA Victrola costs.


    Those are some darn good action-adventure illustrations:
    26 (2).png
     
  12. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    President Roosevelt today signed legislation which will in effect give draftees under the new conscription law a moratorium on the payment of debts and other obligations. The measure specifically provides that courts may suspend the operations of contracts, leases, and other civic obligations of draftees who are unable to continue such payments under their $30 per month Army pay. Eviction from dwellings rented by conscripts will not be permitted under the law in cases where the rent is $80 or less per month, and goods purchased under installment contracts may not be repossessed unless the draftee agrees to it, with the exception of motor vehicles -- which may be repossessed only if the draftee has paid less than 80 percent of the obligation owed. Mortgages may not be foreclosed while the mortgagee is in military service. Life insurance policies of up to $5000 will be kept up by the Veterans Administration for as long as the draftee is in service. In all cases, draftees would be required to settle accumulated debts upon their separation from military service.

    The President today broke his campaign silence by denouncing Republican nominee Wendell Willkie as "a falsifier," and accused him of deliberately and systematically falsifying the major issues of the presidential campaign. The President declared that he will therefore end his silence and will deliver a total of five major campaign addresses between October 23rd and Election Day, the speeches to be delivered from Philadelphia, New York, Washington or Baltimore, Cleveland, and Hyde Park, and in all cases to be broadcast over the radio networks on time purchased by the Democratic National Committee.

    German plans for the invasion of the British Isles were broken into postponement by the Royal Air Force on September 16th, according to information released today by the British Air Ministry. The statement described heavy damage inflicted upon Berlin and Nazi invasion ports along the French coast by intensive British bombing. The precise date for the abandonment of invasion plans was marked, according to the Air Ministry, by a personal reconnaissance mission by Reich Air Minister Hermann Goering, who flew over London on the night of September 15th at the controls of a Junkers airplane.

    Meanwhile, the Ministry of Home Security announced that a total of 6954 civilians were killed and 10,615 were seriously wounded during intensive German air raids over Britain during the month of September.

    A heavy police guard was thrown around the Raymond Street Jail this morning following discovery of a "melodramatic jailbreak plot" intended to free material witnesses in the Murder For Hire Gang investigation.
    According to advance information uncovered by police a large number of gangsters were to get themselves arrested on minor charges and brought into Brooklyn-Queens Night Court for arraignment. They would announce themselves as "unable to make bail," and once crowded into prison vans for the trip to the jail, they were to "overpower the guards" and take control of the van. Upon arrival at the jail they intended to open the gates, and in the clamor of the sudden release, the plan called for them to seize the witnesses and either free them or "take them for a ride." Kings County Sheriff James V. Magnano stated that he learned of the plan around 11 last night, and immediately took steps to reinforce the guard, throwing up a ring of 50 patrolmen and detectives bristling with machine guns and pistols. It became evident that the plan had gone awry when the police van departed from the courthouse carrying just four prisoners. It was also anticipated that a similar plan would be undertaken on Staten Island, but with similar precautions taken, nothing untoward occured. A total of sixteen material witnesses in District Attorney O'Dwyer's probe of the murder-for-money operation are in custody, and it was rumored that the primary target of the jailbreak was Charlie "The Bug" Workman, former aide to Louis "Lepke" Buchhalter who is being held as a material witness in the slaying of one Joseph Rosen.

    The president of the Workers Alliance claimed today that workers on the WPA are being targeted by "Democratic ward heelers" out to enforce bloc voting for President Roosevelt. Alliance president Richard N. McKinnon told the Senate Campaign Expenditures Committee today in Washington that there has been "wholesale intimidation of WPA voters in New York City," despite protests from the Alliance that such efforts violate the constitutional rights of the workers. McKinnon also charged that the American Security Union, a rival to the Workers Alliance now headed by former WA president David Lasser, has no actual membership or program, and does nothing but distribute campaign propaganda in favor of the President's reelection. He urged an investigation of the "mysterious financial support" of that organization.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_.jpg
    (To be honest, there really aren't all that many men going around in burlap suits with pegged-ankle pants and cowboy-heeled shoes. Are there? Because I'd kind of enjoy seeing that.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(1).jpg
    (Hm. Grape Nuts is advertised as "crispy, crunchy, sweet-as-a-nut," but I still don't get the point of this stupid contest. Bah. Incidentally, I wonder what would happen if I went into Loft and asked for an "Awful-Awful?")

    A Flatbush auto mechanic holds the dubious honor of being the first Brooklyn man to be charged with violating the law requiring all men between the ages of 21 and 36 to produce a draft card on demand. 31-year-old Michael Manning of 1456 Flatbush Avenue was cited yesterday in Bay Ridge Court on a disorderly conduct charge after a policeman found him lying on the sidewalk in front of 375 Atlantic Avenue. As a curious crowd gathered, Manning refused an order to get up and move along, and when he was arrested, he could not produce the required certificate of Selective Service registration. The defendant was permitted to re-register after it was determined that he had passed out drunk on the street and while he was unconscious someone stole his coat and his wallet containing his draft card.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(2).jpg
    ("We're goin'," declares Sally, tossing the paper across the table. "We're goin'," agrees Joe. "Hey, waitaminnit -- hoot'ahell is Sonny Boike??")

    The Eagle Editorialist takes offense at DNC chairman Edward Flynn's recent charge that newspapers allow their political coverage to be influenced by advertisers -- and points out that a pro-Roosevelt editorial policy doesn't seem to cost the Daily News much advertising. He also points out that the Times and the Herald-Tribune, both papers Mr. Flynn claims to be subject to such influence carried a full-page advertisement from the "National Committee of Independent Voters for Roosevelt and Wallace" on the same day that his remarks appeared in print.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(3).jpg
    (Hey, who let this hairy-headed guy in here?)

    Campus groups are planning a mass protest at New York University over the college's decision to acknowledge the Jim Crow policy of the University of Missouri by leaving Leonard Bates, star sophomore back, off the squad for the November 2nd game at the Columbus, Mo. school. An "unwritten anti-Negro law bars Negroes from the Missouri campus," and school athletic officials note that they "always abide by their opponents' rules" when they play away games, just as they expect opponents to observe NYU rules when playing in New York. An attempt to avoid confrontation over the situation by having the game moved to New York failed when NYU was unable to rent Yankee Stadium due to the upcoming Army-Notre Dame game there. The University's Board of Athletic Control is expected to issue a public statement on the situation later today, along with Bates himself, who has reportedly said that "if they don't wish me to play, I won't."

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(4).jpg
    (Remember when college football was all about the love of the game? Neither do I.)

    Fifteen years ago, the only parties anybody had were children's birthday parties and bridge parties. But now Halloween parties have come to the fore like never before as the biggest and most elaborate party occasion of the year. Mrs. Claire Kearney operates the Butterfly Party Shop at 703 Flatbush Avenue, and says Halloween parties are pretty much the only occasions anymore for people to have really big, fun party with costumes and decorations. The old favorite "spooky" themes are still the most popular, but more timely themes based on movies are also catching on. "Wizard of Oz" themed parties are expected to still be popular this year, with games and costumes built around ideas from the film. "Murder Mystery" games are another newly popular Halloween diversion.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(5).jpg
    (This is the first mention of pizza that I've noticed in the Eagle since we've been doing these posts. And ya gotta go all the way to Bay Ridge for it. I ask ya.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(6).jpg (If he intends to keep up with this, Boody needs to start giving us subtitles.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(7).jpg (You've got to give Mr. Tuthill credit -- no other cartoonist in 1940 deals so explicitly with characters who are clearly mentally ill. Well, Norman Marsh maybe, but I don't think that's intentional.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(8).jpg
    (Join us tomorrow for "Mary Worth's Family" without the Family.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(9).jpg (And under each little tank there's a little open-backed truck. And under each little open-backed truck there's a little bomb mounted on a roller skate. Get this fun toy set for your kids today!)
     
  13. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    And in the Daily News...

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_.jpg Father Divine's was the most flamboyant of the outre religious movements in New York in 1940, and it in many ways prefigured the impact the Nation of Islam would have in Harlem in the 1950s with its various business enterprises and its philosophy of self-improvement. He was also a lot more of a civil rights activist than he generally gets credit for, having parlayed support for the "Don't Buy Where You Can't Work" boycott movement of the late thirties into his own anti-white supremacist political platform. And his "accentuate the positive" religious philosophy was not all that different from that preached in the 60s by the white celebrity-clergyman Norman Vincent Peale.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(1).jpg
    Coming events cast their shadows before.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(2).jpg The Willkie camp gets in a completely valid thrust here. As long as the 1940 DNC is in thrall to the "Solid South" it's on very thin ground when it comes to race.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(3).jpg
    Oh, sure he "married" her.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(4).jpg Tracy and Pat will of course get out of this, but when they do I hope those cops brought along plenty of Lifebuoy.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(5).jpg Well, gee Andy, if you wanna get laughs, that hat is a pretty good start.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(6).jpg The DL can outcool anyone, anywhere, any time.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(7).jpg Underneath the flinty corporate exterior Wumple is just another blank-eyed sap.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(8).jpg I've eaten in this restaurant.

    Daily_News_Fri__Oct_18__1940_(9).jpg Our special guest star, ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Eugene Pallette.
     
  14. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Is this true? I don't remember ever reading about this flight. If true, you have to give the fat b*stard credit for guts, but again, this is the first time this WWII buff ever heard about this flight.


    "Browning King clothes are tailored one-at-a-time" is trying to imply either custom or, at minimum, not-assembly-line work, but I'd be willing to bet these clothes are made just as any other off-the-rack clothes in 1940 are made. Just like "homemade" for a bakery means whatever the particular bakery wants it to mean and is basically untrue by definition, I seriously doubt BK clothes have one tailor work individually from beginning to end on each suit.


    "hoot'ahell" :)


    VelvetyNaturalChimpanzee-size_restricted.gif


    The movies of the early '30s made it very clear that college football was a corrupt effort - ringers, athletes being passed in classes they didn't attend or had failed, money finding its way to players, big-donor alumni influencing the administration, etc. All the corruption was all there and on the big screen in the early '30s. You only didn't know if you chose not to know.


    "Only Real Italian, French and American Cuisine..." That's confidently covering a wide fare of very different cooking cultures.


    Point of order (I know, surprisingly, not over a comic strip): The husband is $1450 behind in his $25/week alimony payments and the judge awarded the woman his entire $31,500 share of a trust. I get that she's entitle to a penalty for him missing payments, but with alimony payment of $1300 a year, the judge just awarded her about twenty four years of payments.


    Yup, like statues of famous people, very few things today will survive a historical flyspecking holding them to a modern standard.


    Maybe more Edward Arnold as Pallette almost never won; Arnold did occasionally.
     
  15. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Ghia's looks like a nice enough little place...

    nynyma_rec0040_3_06052_0017.jpg
    ...but I imagine you want to make sure you go there when the Brooklyn School of Music isn't in session.

    nynyma_rec0040_3_06052_0015.jpg
    On the other hand, I bet I know where those sidewalk repair guys went for lunch.
     
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  16. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Seeing it, I'm very comfortable with its Italian cuisine, but am now even more suspicious of its claims to French- and American-food expertise. It looks like a perfect little Italian pizzeria restaurant, period.
     
  17. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I did a quick Google and couldn't find any thing about Fat Goering's flight over England - any idea if this is possibly true?
     
  18. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I found a mention of it in the New York Times on September 17th, citing a Berlin source -- and a couple of little magazine squibs that just kind of toss it off as a colorful sidelight of the Battle of Britain, but very little else. It does sound like the kind of propaganda story the Berlin radio would put out to take the edge off the cancellation of the invasion -- but did it happen? ??????? ??????????

    I wonder if Hess is sitting there hearing these reports and going "Hmmmm...."
     
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  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Thank you.

    He probably tried it but the Junker didn't have enough lift to get off the runway.

    If true, it wouldn't change anyone's big (tee-hee) picture of him, but I'd gain an unimportant smidgeon of respect for the risk he took.
     
  20. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Demands by Germany and Italy that Turkey and Greece bring their government policies in line with those of the Axis were indicated as imminent today by an authoritative Fascist weekly. The paper Relazioni Internazionalle declared that "Italian influence on the Balkan and Mediterranean countries...is destined to have future developments. This influence, in relation to war necessities, is henceforth not to be restrained." The publication further stated that "any scruple is unjustified and any delay immoral" in the attainment of the "subjugation of England."

    A forty-year-old union member was shot in the back last night after throwing a stench bomb thru the window of a plant foreman, in a fresh outbreak of violence connected to the seven-week-old strike against the Leviton Manufacturing Company, electrical-products firm of Greenpoint. Raymond Kirchner of Rockaway Beach, a member of Local 3 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, was taken to Jamacia Hospital, where he was charged with disorderly conduct charges stemming from the stench-bombing at the home of Charles Kesseler of Richmond Hill. Leviton foreman. Kesseler opened fire on Kirchener with a 12-gague shotgun after the stench-bombing shortly after midnight, and will be charged with felonious assault. Kirchener denied throwing the stench bomb, telling police that he had just taken a girl back to her home on 104th Street at Jamacia Avenue, and was wounded there "by shots from an unknown source." Police charge that Kirchener and an unknown accomplice first threw a rock thru Kesseler's window and then tossed the stench device thru the broken pane, and Kesseler identified Kirchener as one of two men seen "lurking in the neighborhood" half an hour before the incident.

    The shooting is the second incident of violence connected to the Leviton strike in less than a week. On Wednesday, a picketer, 42-year-old Edith Strohner of 220 Eckford Street, was injured after being run down by a strikebreaker in an automobile. No charges were filed in connection with that incident.

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    Brooklyn's largest draft district has begun operations, with Local Draft Board 152, overseeing 5345 registrants, beginning its work today at its offices in P. S. 2. Meanwhile, tentative quotas for the nine corps areas established nationwide indicate that of the 800,000 men to be drafted over the the next twelve months, approximately 16,000 will be taken from Brooklyn, out of 355,214 local registrants. Brooklyn has been designated as part of the 2nd Corps Area, which has a total conscription quota of 148,294 out of a total of 2,573,193 registrants. The first batch of draftees will be called up on November 18th.

    It is reported that physical requirements for draftees have been drafted and await the President's signature. The details of the new standards have not been disclosed, but it is reported that they will be more stringent in most respects than those of the World War draft. However, it is also reported that the standards are more liberal in certain respects, especially in the matter of height, weight, chest expansion, eyesight, and teeth. The new dental regulations are believed to require that draftees have at least three natural upper and lower biting teeth, and the same number of molars and bicuspids.

    Criticism of Borough President John Cashmore by his Republican challenger for the office over delays in the development of Marine Park have been rebutted by Parks Commissioner Robert Moses, himself a Republican. Responding to charges by Republican candidate Emil Baar that Cashmore's lack of action has kept the Marine Park project from moving forward, Mr. Moses accused Baar of "knowing nothing of park conditions" in the borough, and noted that neither Cashmore nor his predecessor Raymond V. Ingersoll can be held responsible for a project that is not under their jurisdiction. Mr. Moses told Baar in a letter that "more has been accomplished" in the matter of Brooklyn park development over the six years of Moses' tenure as Park Commissioner than in the previous fifty years combined.

    Yellow and black placards inscribed "RIDE WITH ROOSEVELT" and "ALL ABOARD WITH ROOSEVELT" will decorate the sides of 1,180 Brooklyn trolley cars from today until the election. The signs are part of campaign advertising purchased by the Kings County Democratic Committee.

    In bomb-scarred London, women are rushing to purchase the last remaining stocks of silk hosiery. The sale of silk stockings will be banned in Britain as of February 1st.

    In a radio address last night, Mayor LaGuardia accused Republican Presidential nominee Wendell Willkie of being a "ballyhoo artist" with "absolutely no business background." Speaking in Boston at a rally sponsored by the Massachusetts Independent Voters Committee for Roosevelt and Wallace, the Mayor called Mr. Willkie "an average good lawyer who has become a specialist. His specialty is promoting and lobbying. At that he is really good."

    Asserting that thousands of the city's 400,000 students miss school for lack of carfare, City Councilman Edward Vogel is calling for a new program of free or half-fare transfers for elementary and high school pupils on the city-owned transit system. Speaking at a meeting of the United Parents Association at Public School No. 103, Mr. Vogel noted that school attendance plummets during severe weather because many students who usually walk to school cannot afford the carfare to escape the weather by riding -- and those who do walk despite the weather often contract illness as a result.

    The popular hymn "The Old Rugged Cross" will be banned from the radio networks as of January 1st as a result of the ongoing contract dispute between broadcasters and the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers. The hymn, written in 1901 by the Rev. George Bernard, is still under copyright, and like all ASCAP-licensed music, will be prohibited from network broadcasting unless the dispute is settled.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(1).jpg
    (Hey, now, Ben is actually a very bright guy, a polymath among radio announcers, even. If any radio personality could do this, he's the one.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(2).jpg
    (These Pipdyke kids do get around.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(3).jpg
    With Senators manager Bucky Harris the front-runner to replace the soon-to-be-former Indians manager Oscar Vitt, one has to wonder if there isn't an old tribal curse of friction and general chaos hanging over the Cleveland dugout. The Indians have gone thru quite a string of managers in recent years, since the exit of Tris Speaker -- who managed to last eight years in the job, with legendary hurler Walter Johnson among the unfortunate souls to succeed him. Johnson broadcast games in Washington last summer, and Harris might be well advised to talk over conditions in Cleveland with him before taking on the job.

    Meanwhile, Senators owner Clark Griffith acknowledged yesterday that he gave Indians owner Alva Bradley permission to talk to Harris about the job, but insists that no such discussion has yet taken place. It is reported that Harris, who is currently off on a fishing trip in North Carolina, has expressed willingess to take the job, but only if he is given a three-year contract instead of one good for only a single season. Griffith has several options from which to choose Harris's replacement, including his adopted son Calvin, who managed the Senators' Charlotte farm club last season.

    Today's marquee game in college football pits Columbia against Cornell, in a matchup which will be the making or the breaking of the 1940 Lions.

    The Football Dodgers have an even chance to take down the mighty Bears tomorrow if their ends can stand up against the usual brutal pounding dished out by the Chicago club. Coach Jock Sutherland is expected to deploy the forward pass more than he has so far this season as a counter to the strong Chicago defense.

    Billy Conn is one step closer to a title match with Joe Louis after a ten round victory over Al McCoy at Boston Garden last night. Conn dealt out "murderous punishment" against McCoy to win a unanimous decision.

    "Knute Rockne -- All American" is a "sincere and deft" tribute to the man who put Notre Dame on the football map and revolutionized how the game is played, according to Herbert Cohn, who ventured up to the New York Strand to see the picture. The entire film is well cast, especially Pat O'Brien, done up in a putty nose, a false chin, and a bald-head wig as Rockne himself and Gale Page as wife Bonnie.

    At the Patio, it's Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson in "Pride and Prejudice," paired with Carole Landis and John Hubbard in "Turnabout." Something for everyone.

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(4).jpg (With the baseball season over, it's time for incisive political satire.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(5).jpg (I often wonder what Jo was like before she married George, but then I meet her relatives...)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(6).jpg (OK, we're listening.)

    The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle_Sat__Oct_19__1940_(7).jpg (Dan takes on his most implacable enemy of all -- procedure!!)
     

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