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The short length of Aero-leather CR

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,695
Location
London, UK
As others have noted, Aero will be best placed to advise on what is possible.

Also.... don't go *too* short.... bear in mind that this style in Britain was traditionally cut just a little longer than an American-style cross-zip - to do with its racing heritage. The design originates with mimicking the top half of a one-piece leather riding suit as was worn by professional racers by the 50s (two-piece suits came along in large part as more practical for the civilian motorcycling market):

1700049594764.png
1700049688822.png


First image 1950s; second image looks to be mid- late 60s judging by the bikes and the boots of the rider in the foreground (also, civilian fashions in the background). This would have been around the time this style of what in GB was referred to as a 'Mandarin collar' jacket became fashionable among riders here. As opposed to the US where American bikes were very much about the sit-up straight, Harley style riding position, a lot of UK bikers even before the era of Japanese racing bikes preferred a crouched-over the tank, racing-style pose when riding. This had a significant influence on jacket design here. See, for example, how Lewis first tried a leather-covered buckle when they introduced the American-styled Bronx jacket in 1956, then from 1957 with the Lightning and subsequent designs went with side-buckles, intended to avoid a front-mounted waist buckle scratching the paint on the tank in a race-influenced riding position. This also led to some jacket designs - most often the 'cafe racer' style - being cut that little bit longer, so that when the rider crouched over the bike they didn't ride up so far as to let in the draft.

The takeaway here being by all means speak to Aero about having the design cut a little shorter to suit your frame, but don't panic that it looks "wrong" if it wears just slightly longer on you than the likes of a Schott Perfecto.
 

GUYSWEETLAND

New in Town
Messages
34
As others have noted, Aero will be best placed to advise on what is possible.

Also.... don't go *too* short.... bear in mind that this style in Britain was traditionally cut just a little longer than an American-style cross-zip - to do with its racing heritage. The design originates with mimicking the top half of a one-piece leather riding suit as was worn by professional racers by the 50s (two-piece suits came along in large part as more practical for the civilian motorcycling market):

View attachment 560736 View attachment 560737

First image 1950s; second image looks to be mid- late 60s judging by the bikes and the boots of the rider in the foreground (also, civilian fashions in the background). This would have been around the time this style of what in GB was referred to as a 'Mandarin collar' jacket became fashionable among riders here. As opposed to the US where American bikes were very much about the sit-up straight, Harley style riding position, a lot of UK bikers even before the era of Japanese racing bikes preferred a crouched-over the tank, racing-style pose when riding. This had a significant influence on jacket design here. See, for example, how Lewis first tried a leather-covered buckle when they introduced the American-styled Bronx jacket in 1956, then from 1957 with the Lightning and subsequent designs went with side-buckles, intended to avoid a front-mounted waist buckle scratching the paint on the tank in a race-influenced riding position. This also led to some jacket designs - most often the 'cafe racer' style - being cut that little bit longer, so that when the rider crouched over the bike they didn't ride up so far as to let in the draft.

The takeaway here being by all means speak to Aero about having the design cut a little shorter to suit your frame, but don't panic that it looks "wrong" if it wears just slightly longer on you than the likes of a Schott Perfecto.
Oh, don't worry. (╹ڡ╹ )
I just want to fit my belt line.
The jacket of a regular product is longer than my torso.
So I'm looking forward to Aero products.
It's nice to know about a useful history.
Thank you!!
 

Albe64

One of the Regulars
Messages
160
As others have noted, Aero will be best placed to advise on what is possible.

Also.... don't go *too* short.... bear in mind that this style in Britain was traditionally cut just a little longer than an American-style cross-zip - to do with its racing heritage. The design originates with mimicking the top half of a one-piece leather riding suit as was worn by professional racers by the 50s (two-piece suits came along in large part as more practical for the civilian motorcycling market):

View attachment 560736 View attachment 560737

First image 1950s; second image looks to be mid- late 60s judging by the bikes and the boots of the rider in the foreground (also, civilian fashions in the background). This would have been around the time this style of what in GB was referred to as a 'Mandarin collar' jacket became fashionable among riders here. As opposed to the US where American bikes were very much about the sit-up straight, Harley style riding position, a lot of UK bikers even before the era of Japanese racing bikes preferred a crouched-over the tank, racing-style pose when riding. This had a significant influence on jacket design here. See, for example, how Lewis first tried a leather-covered buckle when they introduced the American-styled Bronx jacket in 1956, then from 1957 with the Lightning and subsequent designs went with side-buckles, intended to avoid a front-mounted waist buckle scratching the paint on the tank in a race-influenced riding position. This also led to some jacket designs - most often the 'cafe racer' style - being cut that little bit longer, so that when the rider crouched over the bike they didn't ride up so far as to let in the draft.

The takeaway here being by all means speak to Aero about having the design cut a little shorter to suit your frame, but don't panic that it looks "wrong" if it wears just slightly longer on you than the likes of a Schott Perfecto.
I guess you are right in dating the second photo in the 60s...that bike is a Bultaco TSS 250 2 strokes, built from 1960 to 1970
 

rodgerrr

New in Town
Messages
12
The issue being discussed here is something I am very familiar with. 12 or so years ago I lost a disk and a little bit off 2 vertebrae and wound up dropping from 6' to 5'10, still with a 46 inch chest. I find that jackets with a 24inch back length work about right for what I like (some here would consider even that too long) but most that fit my chest are 26 or longer. Re a short CR - the Schott model P234 might be something to look at. I own 2: the brown fits me great. I'm having the black one taken in right now - yea it's a slim fit but not slim enough. On another note, I recently bought a type3 Y'2 jacket - size 44 which fits like it was made for me. Then I read somewhere where the jackets for the Japanese mkt are made slightly shorter and skinnier (more tapered) versus those for the American mkt and so might fit folks built like me better.
 

GUYSWEETLAND

New in Town
Messages
34
It's been a long time. (。・∀・)ノ゙
The jacket finally came to me in seven weeks.
It was earlier than planned and I feel very good.

It's my first time experiencing horse skin.
The leather is sturdy, glossy, and soft, not to mention.
It tastes different from cowhide.

I had to wear it quickly, and broke jacket right away.

KakaoTalk_20231208_001632711_01.jpg


The overall length was a little shorter than what I asked for.
And sleeve length seems little short too, but I intended it as a fashion jacket.

Back looks a bit loose.
I think this will become natural as broken.

KakaoTalk_20231208_001632711.jpg


They did a great job for what I considered.
I'm satisfied with it!!
I got a very nice jacket on my humble upper body.

It was great pleasure to be with Aero leather.
I hope everyone has a satisfying experience like me.
Thank you for your interest and advice.
 
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