to-night and to-morrow

Discussion in 'The Reading Room' started by bunnyb.gal, May 23, 2011.

  1. bunnyb.gal

    bunnyb.gal Practically Family

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    I hope I've put this into the correct forum, Bartenders.

    I've seen both these words frequently hyphenated in older books and magazines, and would like to know if anyone knows when this form of these words fell into disuse. Thanks!
     
  2. Benzadmiral

    Benzadmiral Call Me a Cab

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    I can recall seeing those constructions in 1930s British novels, but not in 1930s American ones. Like "co-ordinate," I think, these two vanished before WWII.
     
  3. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The hyphenated form was still dominant into the 1910s, but was falling out of favor -- this was the era of "Simplified Spelling," and eliminating extra hyphens was right in line with that philosophy. It remained common in the works of older writers, and in more linguistically-conservative publications for a while longer, but by the thirties it was becoming more a pseudo-classy affectation than something in common use.
     
  4. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    I also remember "To-day" as well. I suspect, as Lizzie says, that it was an attempt to make things less complicated.
     
  5. bunnyb.gal

    bunnyb.gal Practically Family

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    Cheers, Benzadmiral and LizzieMaine. I've always liked the look of these words hyphenated.
     
  6. listenone

    listenone Familiar Face

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    Houston
    ahaa, to-rrent?
     
  7. MikePotts

    MikePotts Practically Family

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    Tivy, Texas.
    I still hyphenate co-ordinate, co-operation etc.. & week-end.

    MP
     
  8. bunnyb.gal

    bunnyb.gal Practically Family

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    Location:
    sunny London
    Can anyone else think of some other once-upon-a-time hyphenated words?
     

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