URGENT WARNING!!! YOU MAY NEVER LOOK AT YOUR LID IN THE SAME WAY AGAIN

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Katt in Hat, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. carebear

    carebear My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    3,220
    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    Among the folks that eat opossums, the word is just "possum".

    I may be a yankee boy, but I know good eats. :D
     
  2. Katt in Hat

    Katt in Hat A-List Customer

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    Location:
    The Gold Coast of Florida
    I'll bet that the fur is water proof.

    Capybara Facts

    Order: Rodentia
    Family: Hydrochoeridae
    Genus and Species: Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris

    Capybara are the largest rodents in the world.

    Description: Capybaras have heavy, barrel-shaped bodies with short heads. Their fur is reddish brown on the upper parts and yellowish brown underneath. Adult capybaras may be as long as 130 centimeters (more than four feet) and 50 centimeters (1.6 feet) tall, and weigh more than 100 pounds.

    Could Crocks be trained to take Capys' down?
    Excess meat could go to Ray Krok's Empire after the Crocks have their fill. We get the fur.
     
  3. Strider

    Strider One of the Regulars

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    .
    Order the hat anyway.
     
  4. carebear

    carebear My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    3,220
    Location:
    Anchorage, AK
    I believe crocs, jaguars, anacondas and humans are the only things in the jungle that can. I wonder if capybara fur ranching has been tried as an income generator for the tribesmen?
     
  5. The problem with farming the species is what do you feed them that will adequately duplicate their natural diet?
    They tried it with rabbits/hares and found thawt the food they were using was far too rich and it made their fur greasy. They had to dry clean the fur to make it useable in hat production. Too high a cost compared to wild hare I am afraid.
    The same would likely be true of the Nutria. Their fur is water proof and very close to that of their wider tailed cousin. I just wonder if the temperature being too warm and the food being too rich might make the fur inferior to the wild type anyway. [huh] We know that they are a pest that can supply what we need without having to farm them. The benfit is twofold---no pest cheap fur. :D :eusa_clap

    Regards,

    J
     

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