What Are You Reading

Discussion in 'The Reading Room' started by Lancealot, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. It also helps that the author is someone who I've exchanged a few emails with and actually met at a Museum of Flight (Seattle) event, and if I were in a situation where I had to bet my life on something involving WWII USN aircraft, he'd be the first name in my speed-dialer, rivaled only by a contact I know who's in the Restoration Shop at National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola.
     
  2. Land-O-LakesGal

    Land-O-LakesGal Practically Family

    Messages:
    864
    Location:
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Right now I am reading Rufus M by Eleanor Estes with my eight year old son.
    We read Ginger Pye by her before this. Both these books were written in the early 40's so it is an interesting peak into history and the everyday life at that time from what a kids perspective might have been.
    the funny thing is I didn't go out looking for these to find a vintage story, I stumbled across them at a garage sale and bought them because my son easily has bad dreams so I am always trying to find books that aren't too scary and these looked pretty innocent. I highly recommend if you have kids that you check her out or even if you are like me and just enjoy reading children's literature.
     
  3. Annichen

    Annichen Familiar Face

    Messages:
    99
    Location:
    1920
    Dwight Frye's Last Laugh

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Berlin

    Berlin Practically Family

    Messages:
    510
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Zusje van me

    A book in my language which means; Sister of me

    [​IMG]
     
  5. cotillion

    cotillion New in Town

    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    California
    Currently studying Dressing the Man by Flusser :)
     
  6. At a lecture given by Terry Eagleton the other week, on the subject of Evil, I was inspired to read Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle". Fantastic book, I should have read it sooner.

    Now that i've finished it, i've started Aldous Huxley's "Time Must Have a Stop".

    bk
     
  7. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,064
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    Sinclair's The Journal of Arthur Stirling is also a great read.

    "six months but in that time I have taught myself to read Greek
    with more than fluency. All you need is good health and spirits,
    a will of iron, and a very tiny notebook in the palm of your hand,
    full of the words you want to learn.
    And then when you come home late at night, are there not the
    great masters who love you?"


    Shades of Thomas Hardy's Jude The Obscure.
    There was a depth to Sinclair that I relish all the more with time.
    __________________________

    Graham Greene's The Power and the Glory, a revisit with another
    great author; whom I had abandoned earlier.
    After The Heart of the Matter and The Quiet American, I thought
    that I had read the best of Greene, whose world view I considered foolish,
    so much for the rest of his canon. However, a certain disquiet lingered
    over The Power and the Glory; considered his masterpiece, which I
    should have at least looked through, taken a stab at a chaper or two.
    Chance discover last week, and with an introduction by John Updike,
    along with a cover citation from William Golding, and I was snared.
    But the epigraph by Dryden buried the hook:

    Th' inclosure narrow'd; the sagacious power
    Of hounds and death drew nearer every hour.


    A Catholic priest chased by evil in Redshirt Mexico.
    Enjoying The Power and the Glory like a wine that must be savored.
     
  8. Tenuki

    Tenuki One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    201
    Location:
    Seattle
    My bed time reading is The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

    My sitting on the couch after dinner reading is Harvard Classics Volume I: Franklin, Woolman and Penn.
     
  9. DesertDan

    DesertDan One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,573
    Location:
    Arizona
    I finished Monster Hunter Vendetta last night. There are Lovecraftian elements to the story which put me in the mood to re-read a few of my favorite stories. So tonight I think it will be "The Dunwich Horror", "The Whisper in Darkness", "A Colour Out Of Space" and whatever else catches my fancy.

    Cheers!
    DD
     
  10. KenDale

    KenDale New in Town

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Just finished "Another Bullsh!# Night in Suck City" by Nick Flynn which is a great read. Have just began reading "The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake" by Aimee Bender.
     
  11. Gad to see you're back in the Greene fold. I would recommend to anyone "The Comedians", set in Haiti under Papa Doc. Realy a fantastic book.

     
  12. Sunny

    Sunny One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,409
    Location:
    DFW
    Yay! Mine arrived late Friday afternoon, and I finished it late Saturday night. I've never actually read Lovecraft and I totally see those elements - I'm almost in the mood myself! And if you didn't hear, the rough draft of Monster Hunter Alpha is finished. :eusa_clap
     
  13. DesertDan

    DesertDan One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,573
    Location:
    Arizona
    ^^Yes, I'm really looking forward to reading Earl Harbinger's story!

    I'm also looking forward to Larry's "Hard Magic" series the sample chapters I've read are really good, and it is set in the "Golden Era" as well...Bonus! :D
     
  14. Alpha's gonna be especially interesting, particularly depending on how far Larry takes up into Harbinger's head... The downside of near-immortality being having to bury everyone you ever care about would be my personal idea of Hell on Earth, not to mention a life worth accepting, even embracing, my own demise to avoid.

    I also suggested that, if he ever needs Golden Era info for the Grimnoir Chronicles series, he should register here and pick this community's brains. I wouldn't be surprised if he actually lurks already... :D
     
  15. HepKitty

    HepKitty One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,156
    Location:
    Idaho
    The Private Pilot Manual. And my favorite pilot here at work gave me a few aviation magazines to keep me entertained. I need more work to do today. I even snooped at other's work to see if I could help and there is nothing [huh]
     
  16. How much leeway do you have on your IT config? If I were in your position, I'd look into FS X For Pilots and discreetly sneaking a yoke and pedals in under the desk. Or start with a small stick... the Saitek Cyborg X is around $50, and folds/disassembles (base folds, stick pops off) to fit into some large laptop cases.

    Especially if you can get out to the Internet and have somebody else act as "flight instructor" or "ATC"...:D
     
  17. HepKitty

    HepKitty One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,156
    Location:
    Idaho
    lol I love working in I T. Have access to extra computers and an outside internet connection. The challenge for me would be the yoke & rudder pedals, for now anyway. Thanks for the info, I've been looking and have not found one under $150 yet
     
  18. Packin' Heat

    Packin' Heat One of the Regulars

    Currently reading Cugel's Saga, by Jack Vance.
     
  19. :eek:fftopic: HK, downside of the Cyborg X is it's rather lacking in realistic appearance, but it IS portable and DOES have a two-throttle mini-quadrant built in. Also, with the extra computer, you might be able to set it up as a "server"--and if your pilot buddy's around and neither of you are busy, maybe have him throw random malfunctions at you. I once read in AOPA Pilot of a flight instructor who tested a student on dead-stick by turning the engine off, pulling the key and pitching it out the window... (He had brought a spare, just in case, and after the "teachable moment" used it to restart the engine.)

    Just picked up my "beater" copy of Monster Hunter Vendetta, and the American Handgunner: Reality Check 2011 annual.
     
  20. HepKitty

    HepKitty One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,156
    Location:
    Idaho
    :eek: It would be really hard not to panic at that point. Even more :eek:fftopic: , I've heard that the keys for the little planes are often the same as for camper shells and the like, as Steve once proved to the astounded clerk at the AvCenter. Extra keys? No problem!

    Books: Middle Eastern cookbooks, bread books, retro party food...
     

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