Who is your favorite "forgotten singer"?

Discussion in 'Radio' started by Hammelby, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. "Hildegarde"

    Hildegarde claimed to be from Paris, which was all a story cooked up by her or her manager, she actualy came from The USA, and put on a very dodgy French accent, she looked amazing, and was " tres elegante"

    According to my February 1938 copy of esquire magazine: "The Crystal room at the Ritz has again been re-decorated and a more intimate show attempted than the gay affair of last year. The one and only Hildegarde, evidently weary of waiting for television to catch up with her is the chanteause, the dance orchestra is that of Rudolph Friml."

    http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=RblMSHULNXU
     
  2. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,239
    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI

    I LOVE Helen Ward! An unfortunately overlooked warbler of the swing era. She could even make tripe like "The Dixieland Band" or "The Popcorn Man" swing.
     
  3. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,239
    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI

    Opposite ends of the spectrum, eh?

    Coborn singing "The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo" in five languages, or Champion intoning "A Little Bit of Cucumber" Both wonderful, but for my money, one can't beat "Dainty" Lilly Morris' cockney numbers, "Don't 'ave any More Mrs. Moore". "My Old Man Said Follow the Van", or her seriocomic wail "Why Am I Always The Bridesmaid". B

    Billy Williams is another of my favorite music hall artists. Try his "When Father Papered the Parlor", or "Giving a Donkey a Strawberry".

    As far as American artists of the period, there is the inimitable Billy Murray, with his way with topical songs, and Henry Burr, singing "heart songs" in his sympathetic manner.

    Faye Templeton certainly had a way with a comic number, check out her rendition of "the Bully" if you can find it, and for Rube and Darky humor Billy Golden can't be beat. What a powerful voice, and what excellent comic timing!
     
  4. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,239
    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI
    Another favorite of mine who is largely forgotten today is Lee morse. Her style is not to everyone's, taste, but she mad a good many excellent recordings in the late 1920's.

    For comic numbers with a jazz influence, Jay C. Flippen could not be beat, and for straight vocals there is a great deal that may be said in Irving Kaufman's favor.
     
  5. tuppence

    tuppence Practically Family

    Messages:
    532
    Location:
    Hellbourne Australia
    josephine baker

    I'm listening to her now. It is a shame that she is remembered more for her topless bananna dance, than her beautiful singing voice
     
  6. StaceFace

    StaceFace One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    270
    Location:
    Oak Harbor, WA
    Ginny Simms from her work with Kay Kyser. I particularly liked her on With the Wind and the Rain in Your Hair.
     
  7. Elizabeth.F

    Elizabeth.F Familiar Face

    Messages:
    57
    Location:
    Washington
    I was excited when I saw that a couple of people mentioned Billy Murray. I love his singing voice and nothing can make me laugh harder than one of his novelty songs!
     
  8. Bill Taylor

    Bill Taylor One of the Regulars

    Actually, his name was Billy Murray, not Bill and he wasn't the first or most popular recording star of that time. Other of his big hits of the teens was Me and My Gal, Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts for the Solders (on the Singer in the Kitchen) and many many other hits. Al Jolson also did Sister Susie (he was a bigger star than Murray). Billy Murray did Over There in 1917 (Victor), but the big hit was Nora Bayes version, also in 1917 but earlier. Other bigger recording stars were Al Jolson (Swanee, Mammy, Toot Tootsie, Goodbye) and Fanny Brice (later known as "Baby Snooks" on the radio) with her pre 1919 recordings of My Man, Second Hand Rose, Rose of Washington Square, etc. Also big hitters of the time were the Stoneman's, The Peerless Quartet. Nora Bayes wrote and recorded Shine on Harvest Moon in 1908 (or 1903 - can't remember, exactly). Oddly, though, that became the signature song of Ruth Etting in the late teens and during the 20's. The first recording star to sell 1 million records was Enrico Caruso, in 1902 (I think is the date). Another "song and dance man" of the teens was William Frawley (in his later life Fred Mertz (Fred and Ethyl) on the I Love Lucy Show in the 1950's. I have a ton of 78 records from the teens, 20's, 30's which I inherited. I kind of like the tinny sound of the acoustic 78s(pre about 1925 or so when they were changed to electric). I forgot a bunch of other big hit stars of the teens such as Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey (now THATS the blues). I think Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey were the mentors of Ella Fitzgerald and maybe Billie Holiday. I keep remembering other big hit recording stars of the teens such as John McCormack (It's a Long Way to Tipperary - 1914 and Keep the Home Fires Burning - 1914) and I better stop now or this will go on forever.

    Will

    (actually, come to think of it, most of these aren't really "forgotten" and quite a few people recognize the names)
     
  9. mannySpaghetti

    mannySpaghetti One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    Haverhill, MA
    Probably not as forgotten as I think, but I like Jack Jones. I think the guy's got a great voice.
     
  10. FATS88

    FATS88 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    111
    Location:
    FRISCO
    REMEMBER KJAZ?

    Favorite female vocalist
    has to be "The American original" Betty Carter.
    I was just begining to understand her artistry when she passed...
    What a tough Lady, and loving educator.
    Favorite male, the late, great Bobby Scott, who penned "the Taste of Honey"
    although most associate it with the Tijuana Brass, I feel that only
    Morgana "Momma Corleone" King did it justice.
    He had the warmest personal tone, I've heard...yet.
    He only made two solo recordings that I know of, shortly before
    HE passed.
    He was Quincy Jones' choice for piano on many recordings, and
    motion picture scores.


    Cheers!
    Fats
     
  11. just_me

    just_me Practically Family

    Messages:
    723
    Location:
    Florida
    I remember Jack Jones (his father was Allan Jones of Donkey Serandade fame). My friends and our dates thought we were too cool to go to our high school prom, so the boys rented a limo and we went into the city. After dinner at a French restuarant, we went to the Persian Room at the Plaza Hotel and saw Jack Jones. We really enjoyed him. :eusa_clap
     
  12. Marzipan

    Marzipan One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Western Mass
    I love Betty Hutton, Blossom Dearie, and Jo Stafford.
     
  13. FATS88

    FATS88 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    111
    Location:
    FRISCO
    BLOSSOM!

    I love Blossom also!
    First turned on to her, along with her Husband Bob Dorough Sat.
    and Sun. mornings with "multiplication rock"
    Later in my life she was also a regularly featured artist on KJAZ,
    my favorite work of hers, besides "Number Eight"
    is "The Answering Machine"lol
    Brings back great memories


    Cheers!
    Fats
     
  14. magnolia76

    magnolia76 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    138
    Location:
    Boston to Charleston
    Gordon Lightfoot. What a beautiful voice.
     
  15. Katt in Hat

    Katt in Hat A-List Customer

    Messages:
    353
    Location:
    The Gold Coast of Florida
    Robin and Linda Williams as Marvin and Mavis Smiley and the Manhattan Valley Boys and their tribute to ...
    on Prairie Home Companion Archive. Numerous appearances...

    http://www.prairiehome.publicradio.org/programs/20020622/mm.shtml


    The unique Frances Faye almost never remembered, all but forgotten. My Mother's LP collection now my treasure.
    http://www.tyleralpern.com/francesfaye.html

    Ah, Blossom Dearie singing 'BLUESETTE"...

    This post addresses 3 other older posts.
    :rage:
     
  16. Lily Powers

    Lily Powers Practically Family

    I love the sound of Johnny "Scat" Davis' voice. He did some acting and was a horn player, but his most famous singing was on "Hollywood Hotel," where he played the trumpet and sang "Hooray For Hollywood."

    [​IMG]
     
  17. tbrunke

    tbrunke Familiar Face

    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    I was reading through all these pages to see if anyone would mention Ivie Anderson! She was awesome and died much too young. Ivie sang with Duke Ellington's Band......."It Don't Mean A Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing".....

    I also really like Helen Ward, Helen Forrest and all the old 20's singers who are now mostly forgotten!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.