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You know you are getting old when:

Messages
11,884
Location
Southern California
You know that you are getting old if you can remember when a long distance phone call, without operator assistance, was a big deal.
I can clearly remember Dad bemoaning the fact that he had to dial ten whole numbers to make a long distance call.
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Tiki Tom

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,148
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
I vaguely remember that we had a party line telephone connection when I was a kid. I’m not sure if this is an accurate memory... but I seem to recall my mother listening in to calls that were none of her business. Was that even possible? That’s why I question the veracity of this memory.
 
Messages
10,536
Location
My mother's basement
^^^^^
Such is the nature of memory.

I can heartily recommend Lawrence Wright’s “Remembering Satan.” It’s an account, in part, of people recalling events that plainly could not have happened. It’s not that they were lying (not all of them, anyway). It’s that their minds constructed memories of events that never occurred.

That palace my grandfather lived in still stands. It’s the same house it was 60-plus years ago, at least from the outside, but somehow it turned into just a house. I trust that had I not driven past on my visits back to Madison, or if not for Google Street View, my descriptions of it would leave a listener with a less than accurate mental image.
 
I vaguely remember that we had a party line telephone connection when I was a kid.

We had one (a three-party line) when we lived in rural Dallas County, Missouri in the early 1980s. The old lady down the creek was listening in on most of our conversations. It was tempting to make up stuff just so she could gossip about it later.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
32,872
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
I vaguely remember that we had a party line telephone connection when I was a kid. I’m not sure if this is an accurate memory... but I seem to recall my mother listening in to calls that were none of her business. Was that even possible? That’s why I question the veracity of this memory.

Very much so. It was common recreation around my neighborhood. "I CAN HEAR YOU KIDS BREATHIN'! HANG UP THAT PHONE OR I'M GONNA KILL YA!"
 
Messages
11,884
Location
Southern California
I vaguely remember that we had a party line telephone connection when I was a kid. I’m not sure if this is an accurate memory... but I seem to recall my mother listening in to calls that were none of her business. Was that even possible? That’s why I question the veracity of this memory.
Back in the 60s and early 70s we would occasionally pick up the receiver to make a call and hear two people talking instead of a dial tone. We had no idea who or where those people were, so listening seemed pointless without further context. But once in a while the conversation was at least somewhat interesting, so... *shrug*
 
Messages
10,271
Location
vancouver, canada
We are in the middle of painting the upstairs of our house. Two days work, lots of up and down ladders. My knees are yakking ....and that gives me pause to think..."this is likely the last major paint job we will ever undertake." Much like the thought that if we decide to run our current SUV til it drops it will be the last car I ever own. A number of years back I went to the Meindl footwear store to buy a new pair of walking shoes. At the time my current Meindl's were 25 years old, had undergone 3 or 4 rebuilds but now the leather was just too far gone. I told the young clerk the story and their age then went on to say in a grave tone...."This could, based on these Meindls, likely be the last pair of shoes I will ever buy." She did not know what to do with that statement and she hurried off into the store room to look for other models for me. The current Meindls are now 15 years old, and still like new. As I no longer work pretty sure I won't be buying another pair.
 

Tiki Tom

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,148
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
In prep for our retirement move, we just bought some new living room furniture and some (if I may say so) pretty posh Persian carpets. It did in fact dawn on me that these are very likely the last furniture purchases we will ever make. Ever. So I spent a bit more than is normally in my nature. :D:D:D
 
Messages
10,536
Location
My mother's basement
We are in the middle of painting the upstairs of our house. Two days work, lots of up and down ladders. My knees are yakking ....and that gives me pause to think..."this is likely the last major paint job we will ever undertake." Much like the thought that if we decide to run our current SUV til it drops it will be the last car I ever own. A number of years back I went to the Meindl footwear store to buy a new pair of walking shoes. At the time my current Meindl's were 25 years old, had undergone 3 or 4 rebuilds but now the leather was just too far gone. I told the young clerk the story and their age then went on to say in a grave tone...."This could, based on these Meindls, likely be the last pair of shoes I will ever buy." She did not know what to do with that statement and she hurried off into the store room to look for other models for me. The current Meindls are now 15 years old, and still like new. As I no longer work pretty sure I won't be buying another pair.

I bought a new pair of Red Wing Iron Rangers a couple years back, wore ’em only for shoveling snow and digging in the garden and such because they were too stiff to wear all day and besides, I still had (and have) the Red Wings I bought new in 1974. But now the new ones have softened up and the cork midsoles have taken the shape of my feet. At this point, buying another pair of Red Wings could hardly be called a necessity.

New garage door is scheduled for installation tomorrow. You know you’re not a kid anymore when this is the sort of thing you find exciting. And odds are excellent I’ll never have to buy another.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
32,872
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
When I bought my Subaru, I did some math first and was very disappointed. A modern car will last a maximum of 18 years in the environment here before it's no longer inspectable. This car will thereforee have to be junked in 2031, when I will be 68 years old. I did not want to buy this car, or any car, because I hate buying cars, but I had hoped that if I did have to buy a car, it would be the last car I'd ever have to buy in my ilife. The odds, alas, are that this will not be, and I find that very frustrating. My mother just had to buy another car at the age of 82, and I desperately do not want to find myself in her situation.
 
Messages
10,536
Location
My mother's basement
In prep for our retirement move, we just bought some new living room furniture and some (if I may say so) pretty posh Persian carpets. It did in fact dawn on me that these are very likely the last furniture purchases we will ever make. Ever. So I spent a bit more than is normally in my nature. :D:D:D

The saying goes something like “Pay more to get what you really want and cry only once.”

And it ain’t like they give away the lesser stuff.
 
Messages
10,271
Location
vancouver, canada
I bought a new pair of Red Wing Iron Rangers a couple years back, wore ’em only for shoveling snow and digging in the garden and such because they were too stiff to wear all day and besides, I still had (and have) the Red Wings I bought new in 1974. But now the new ones have softened up and the cork midsoles have taken the shape of my feet. At this point, buying another pair of Red Wings could hardly be called a necessity.

New garage door is scheduled for installation tomorrow. You know you’re not a kid anymore when this is the sort of thing you find exciting. And odds are excellent I’ll never have to buy another.
Our natural gas furnace is 30 years old....waay passed its life expectancy.....alas at about $5K per I know this is not my last furnace unless of course.........
 

Harp

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,508
Location
Chicago, IL US
I've posted this before, but it happened again. Chicago has partially reopened, hit or miss, some places remain
closed and few that have withered the storm are still flying the flag. And, commuters remain but a trickle drop
by drop in the overall downtown scene can be seen. And the world's oldest profession occasionally appears too.
Chicago Police prostitution squads are out and about. Gave a solicit the head shake no, passed a fiver for coffee
and a roll, and the squad car pulls up. Last time I was accosted it was a policewoman posing, and I flashed a badge,
federal agent going home after a long day guys. And a smile, apologies. This time, I was a little more direct,
told the guys I slipped her a fin for coffee. And asked in these days of Covid are they really that busy?
 
Messages
11,884
Location
Southern California
When I bought my Subaru, I did some math first and was very disappointed. A modern car will last a maximum of 18 years in the environment here before it's no longer inspectable. This car will thereforee have to be junked in 2031, when I will be 68 years old. I did not want to buy this car, or any car, because I hate buying cars, but I had hoped that if I did have to buy a car, it would be the last car I'd ever have to buy in my ilife. The odds, alas, are that this will not be, and I find that very frustrating. My mother just had to buy another car at the age of 82, and I desperately do not want to find myself in her situation.
I'm currently staring down that specific barrel myself because on December 2nd my truck got t-boned by a thirty-something addict who was high on something other than life and didn't have the good sense to get stoned and stay home on the couch watching soap operas. My truck sacrificed itself protecting my wife and I, but as I creep up on my 60th birthday I find myself in the market for a used miracle vehicle that will somehow get me through the next 25 years or so. :(
 

Fifty150

One Too Many
Messages
1,833
Location
The Barbary Coast
A modern car will last a maximum of 18 years in the environment here before it's no longer inspectable

In snow states, the corrosion is so bad that when The State says that they can no longer inspect the car, it usually means that the car is no longer safe to operate. Corrosion from road salt eats away at everything from body panels, frames, to fittings, seals, and gaskets. Cars don't last more than 18 years where you live? I'm sorry. One of my vehicles is an 05 model year, and another is an 07 model year. George Bush economy. I had more money then. And those were step-downs from when I had more money during the Clinton years with The Dot Com Bubble. It wasn't until a few years ago, that I could afford to purchase another vehicle.....Trump dollars. Irony is that this last car was the least expensive vehicle I ever bought. This last car cost less out-the-door than every other car I've owned.

in the market for a used miracle vehicle

What do you need? Large truck for hauling heavy loads and towing boats? Offroad for hunting and fishing? Large family that a 4 seater won't hold? Speed? Fuel efficiency? Pimp Mobile with big, shiny wheels? I bought a "city van" or "Euro-van" a few years ago. 7 passenger seating. 6 seats fold down for cargo. Much smaller engine than V8s found in full size vans. Better mileage than any of the SUVs, with more interior room. I gave up a 5.0 liter V8 engine, in a Mercury all-wheel-drive. Which in hindsight, I should have never bought. I didn't need the full luxury trim leather interior to go camping, hunting, and fishing. I still have 1/2 ton truck with a lift kit (dumb choice for living in The City), and a cruiser motorcycle (although a smaller 250cc bike or even a motor scooter would be better). I think age is making me more practical. As I no longer own any fast cars with modified engines.

the world's oldest profession occasionally appears too

In my corner of the world, that profession did not take a Covid quarantine time out. Brothels continued to operate while you couldn't eat in a restaurant, get a haircut, have a cup of coffee, or get your eyebrows waxed. Massage parlors stayed open like essential businesses.


Chicago Police prostitution squads are out and about.

In some cities, and Chicago may be one of them, prostitution is treated like a revenue source. Cops conduct surveillance so that they can testify that they witnessed the prostitute speak through car windows which is consistent with negotiating sex for sale, getting into different cars all night long, and several times the cars were followed and the officer witnessed behavior consistent with sexual activity. The girl is contacted, and during the course of the detention, investigators found her carrying large sums of currency and condoms. The girl is subsequently arrested. She is allowed to post bail, usually less than $500, which she already has in her possession. Court allows her to plea guilty to a lesser charge of disturbing the peace. She is fined, amazingly $500, so returned bail is forfeited to pay the fine. And it becomes a revolving door. Prostitutes and pimps know what the price is. That's just the cost of doing business, and the city has a revenue source like writing parking tickets.
 
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