Bachelor Living in the Golden Era

Discussion in 'The Golden Era' started by poetman, Oct 17, 2020.

  1. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,522
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    I was out the door within weeks of high school graduation. Had I stayed much longer, either the Old Man or I would have been dead.

    It wasn’t what you’d call an idyllic childhood. I was happy to put it behind me.
     
  2. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,522
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    This evening I was searching through an old oak chifferobe I was gifted, like, 30(?) years ago from a friend’s widow. It has drawers of various sizes and a pull-out hanging rod and a mirror that tucks away into its own little drawer. At one time it served as a person’s clothes closet and dresser, all in one. That’s what it was made for, anyway.

    These days it seems we are to aspire to walk-in closets the size of those one-room residential units we’ve discussed above.

    I get it, though. I have so many old garments that they’ve taken over much of the basement utility room, which is itself larger than those single-occupancy rooms of that bygone era.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
    Edward likes this.
  3. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
    21,397
    Location:
    London, UK
    When I first moved to London in 1999 for work, I came over for a couple of days a week or two in advance to try to find somewhere to live. My dad came with, and he'd chanced across the website for the London City YMCA. When we got there and looked around at what was available, I discovered I could stay in the YM long term (up to three years) for the same rate - bed, board, TV in my room and all bills - for the cost of room only in the area. I had a very happy two and a half years there until the time came to buy. The building is now knocked down, being replaced by a new building which I gather will be more focussed on serving the local community in terms of homelessness and such. I enjoyed it immensely - a sense of community, and at the same time much more privacy than I'd have had in a flatshare. Not to mention it was much cheaper. The other bonus was getting used to living out on my own (I stayed at my parents' right through university, under and post grad) before I also needed to run a home fully.

    I remember a time when our local cinema in Ireland did that. Early eighties. A schoolfriend's family went and saw the last 3/4 and then the first 1/4 thereafter of ET, I remember.


    I was usually the leather guy, but if I was good they let me be the "Red Indian" sometimes.

    In my experience it was partly a class and background thing. Those of us in my middle class (UK middle class, that is) circles growing up in the 80s and nineties tended to move out either at or after university. There was an expectation we'd get on the property ladder asap. Earlier generations in Northern Ireland tended to live at home until they left to set up their own marital home (I have an aunt who never married and lived with my grandmother until the latter died in 2005). More so for women - men were more commonly expected to get out and get on the property ladder. Lots of emphasis on buying your house, as across the UK there's very little legal protection or much in the way of rights if you rent, hence property ownership is fetishised. I can see that starting to change again as 'generation rent' bites. Here in London there are actually a couple of projects already which are a sort of 'aparthotel' type arrangement for individuals of all ages, as a semi-permanent option. I can only imagine this will increase over the next few years.[/QUOTE]
     
  4. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

    Messages:
    754
    Location:
    Chicago
    I remember reading in the 1940s Good Housekeeping magazine about a mother worrying about her daughter living alone in her own apartment. And in the article it was giving details on why it would be safe and why a mother need'nt worry about her daughter's learning/picking up bad habits from living away from her parent's home.
     
    Edward likes this.
  5. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,808
    Location:
    Cobourg
    At one time it was common for single men to live in hotels. Nicola Tesla never lived anywhere else, after he left his parents home.
    When he arrived in New York in the 1880s there was no such thing as an apartment house. If you were a family man you rented a house, or you lived in a hotel. There were residential hotels that rented rooms and suites by the month or year, and transient hotels that catered to travelers and rented by the night or week.
    Tesla always stayed at the newest, best hotel in town. In the 1880s that meant the Gerlach which specialized in "French flats" of up to 7 rooms and cost $800 to $2500 a year. To put this in perspective, there were cheap hotels where you could rent a room for $2 a week or $100 a year.
    Later Tesla moved to the Waldorf Astoria, and from there to the New Yorker where he died in 1943. At the New Yorker he occupied two adjoining 2 room suites, one for his living quarters and the other for an office and small laboratory. He was 87 when he died.
    The Dakota was the first apartment house in New York. It was under construction when Tesla arrived in the city.
     
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  6. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,808
    Location:
    Cobourg
    Apartments became more common in the 1920s and hotel living less so, in cities. Rooming houses and boarding houses were rather "down market". They were largely gone by the 1970s. In my area they were shut down by local governments claiming they were a fire and health hazard. It was after that, when the homeless suddenly became a problem. Until then there had been practically no homeless problem since the 1930s depression.
     
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  7. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,140
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    I once considered a Chicago residential hotel lease which ideally suited my bachelor peripatetic nature
    but chose a Gold Coast studio at LaSalle & Division instead. The neighborhood was eclectic and interesting,
    while the building itself hosted a variety of tenants. After three years the building went condo. I did receive
    a first buy offer, declined, moving out of the city back to the hometown, Oak Lawn.
     
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  8. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage Practically Family

    Messages:
    754
    Location:
    Chicago
    I here you, I still pretty much live a peripatetic life, and enjoyed residential hotel living immensely. I had no idea one could ask to sign a lease to be a permanent resident, I may have read this during my research but it slipped my mind. And before this I too lived in a studio for 17 years, the manager asked all the tenants to move out in order to rehab the units.

    And while living at the hotel and with all the rioting going on in the city this year, and being a bachelorette my safety was in danger. I decided to move into a suburb closest to the city. And the landlord made me a offer I could not refuse, free electric, free water, free cooking gas, and free heat.

    And once the lockdowns are over and I can resume my peripatetic life style, I'll keep my suburban apartment and still rent an occasional residential hotel when I am called a way.
     
  9. Harp

    Harp I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,140
    Location:
    Chicago, IL US
    The afflictions of Chicago ethnic and racial communities; real and imaginary, boiled over the cauldron
    and spilt a blood feud such as to lay rest to further aggrieved historic claim or tolerance of social anarchy.
    A more pragmatic perspective will emerge to demand practical accommodation to the realities of life
    and attendant civic responsibility since all theories were literally trampled this year.
     
  10. Bushman

    Bushman My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,678
    Location:
    Chicago
    My mother grew up in Oak Lawn after moving from Calumet Heights in '63. I learned to swim in the Richard HS swimming pool!
     
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