Best black biker for non-biker?

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Bigbenbs, Oct 6, 2018.

  1. TheMarriedHermit

    TheMarriedHermit One of the Regulars

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    Discussions are fun and profitable ONLY when there is respectful disagreement and well-reasoned difference of opinion and view-point.

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  2. FREEradical

    FREEradical New in Town

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    Actually, a french seam is a stronger and more labor intensive method of construction than a top stitched seam. The French seam isn’t merely decorative, it’s also very robust.
     
  3. Jejupe

    Jejupe Practically Family

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    Agreed. That’s usually the case in TFL. One of the reasons why I like this place!
     
  4. FREEradical

    FREEradical New in Town

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    Definitely the Real Mccoys Buco JH-1. It’s crazy expensive but also crazy beautiful. French seams throughout, understated but still edgy as a cross zip should be in my opinion. My favorite aspects are the mismatched hardware, brass zips and chrome snaps and the buffalo plaid wool liner - seriously cool.
     
  5. Bigbenbs

    Bigbenbs A-List Customer

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    Only fair enough to throw the ball back into my court.

    As I was thinking about this, I realized that part of my sense of confusion came from the fact that the black cross-zip biker is such a paradigmatic category, like the cafe racer and A2, and that the permutations within that category can get highly subtle. I know other jacket models work in the same way. But when I got the Aero Hooch Hauler, which was my first high-level leather jacket, I wasn't interested in a paradigm of jacket per se, but was rather just wowed by that particular jacket. I am also wowed by the A2 model and classic black biker cross-zip but have found it somewhat more difficult to appreciate the relevant distinctions. So I could have just as easily started this thread about the A2. I was just reading another thread about how much certain members loved Langlitz so decided to start with the biker to try get some perspective.

    I tried to capture a bit of some of the collective wisdom shared in an earlier post, so that can just stand there. But I'd say what I've learned is that I need to a) find a non-bank busting way of getting my hands on more and more jackets to get a more grounded sense of certain practicalities and 2) start trolling through loads of pictures and prior threads to begin differentiating for myself what I find most appealing, using some of the advanced criteria given by Superfluous. And then once I've reached a certain maturity in that process, it may be time to 3) invest in a very high-quality hunk of hide, and to not cut corners for the sake of a few $, but to make sure I get exactly what I'm yearning for.
     
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  6. Carlos840

    Carlos840 Call Me a Cab

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    I don't know if this makes sens, but you don't know what you can't see. And usually you won't see things until they are in your hands.
    Back in 2012 i bought my Schott, and to me it was a really well made jacket... As soon as i got my Lewis Leathers not long after, i could see that Schott couldn't compete with the execution of LL, i then got my LaBrea this year and it makes the Schott look like it was made in the dark by a 12 year old.
    Still, people will say Schott are well made jackets and find all kind of arguments to prove it. Most of them haven't handled a Freewheelers or a Real McCoy... They don't know how much better than a Schott things could be!
    I didn't know that either until both were in my hands, no pictures could have prepared me for the difference in craftsmanship!

    Looking at pictures is good, but until you have experienced many jackets first hand you won't fully see what is going on.
    You might never even see the differences, for some people both a Schott and a RMC are "black leather jackets" and that's as far as they go.

    (not hating on Schott, it is just objectively the worst jacket in my collection as far as craftsmanship goes)
     
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  7. Bigbenbs

    Bigbenbs A-List Customer

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    You live in Belgium right?
     
  8. Carlos840

    Carlos840 Call Me a Cab

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    Unfortunately not for the moment, i have been in London for years and all my jackets live here.
    I am planning my return to Belgium soon though
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2018
  9. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Well you say it's expensive: I checked out one for sale: £1,595 for one like this:
    https://www.superdenim.com/uk/buco-jh-1-horsehide-leather-jacket-brown.html
    jh1.jpg
    But if you wre ignorant of leatherware and you fancied a biker leather, you might assume that the more expensive the jacket, the better it must be. Going by that yardstick, Gucci is a well known fashion house, their biker leather comes in at £6,400, and there's only one left.
    https://www.brownsfashion.com/uk/sh...MIwPvjn9H23QIVUKmaCh1LIgK2EAQYAiABEgK4XfD_BwE
    gucci-king-charles-spaniel-biker-jacket_11794442_8482016_1000.jpg
    It just goes to show that all that glitters is not gold. I certainly know which jacket I would choose.
     
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  10. Mich486

    Mich486 Practically Family

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    That’s the old batch price for the jh-1. Now it’s £2095. Go figure why such a hike. Still a beautiful jacket.


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  11. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

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    Should you pen a "Best A2 for a non-pilot" thread, I'll bring refreshments!
    IMG_1794.JPG
     
  12. TheMarriedHermit

    TheMarriedHermit One of the Regulars

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    I am fascinated by the idea that every leather jacket is a historical and cultural reference (I'll keep the psychological, mythical, and sexual aspects out of this, although they, too, have their place here); and that one needs to be aware of those references to understand and adapt them to one's personal context for the jacket to be right, to "work". What are the things that come to mind when you hear the words "black leather jacket"? Off the top of my head: motorcycles, rebellion, outlaw bikers, Marlon Brando, Mad Max, the Terminator, the Ramones, Motorhead, rock and roll, punk, heavy metal; and the most frequent one, because most often seen by me these days--paunchy, middle-aged men headed over-the-hill on their La-Z-Boy Harleys. The color itself is a reference. This is not just idle theorizing; your awareness of these things in choosing a particular jacket will make a difference between it being a subtle and natural expression of your personal style, indeed of your personality; or making you look like you're on your way to a costume party; or, perhaps worst of all, that you're a trendy wanna-be with no sartorial sense whatsoever. These considerations are best left for the wearer of the jacket to work out for himself, though, because "individual" is the key word when it comes to choices and decisions. That's my bit of mental lint this morning. Over and out.

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    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  13. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Now there's a thought, the refreshments, not the A2. Leather jackets might be expensive but their mark up for profit is an average of 25% (perhaps with the exception of Gucci) But what’s harder to digest? Movie theatre popcorn has an average markup of 1,275%, and that popcorn has a caloric equivalent of three McDonald’s Quarter Pounders? Nutrition aside, concessions like $5 tubs of popcorn are big revenue streams for movie theaters.
     
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  14. TheMarriedHermit

    TheMarriedHermit One of the Regulars

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    That fellow Gucci, he's one of the Village People, right?

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  15. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Oi!
    on the harley.jpg
     
  16. TheMarriedHermit

    TheMarriedHermit One of the Regulars

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    Not to worry--after that hill there's another one, and another... As long as you have that happy, loving lady by your side; that is all that matters.

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    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
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  17. OneEyeMan

    OneEyeMan Practically Family

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    I can solidly recommend the Vanson Enfield. I'm a 40 and I bought a 38. It fits like a second skin. However, I wear it on the bike and I wanted it to fit snugly. If you're not riding, just buy your correct size. It's gorgeous, thick as hell, simply styled to go with everything and just begs to be worn everywhere. Just be aware it won't work if you're "full" around the belly.
     
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  18. dubpynchon

    dubpynchon Practically Family

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    I second the Vanson Enfield, I’ve had over a dozen or so high end leather jackets (a very small number I am aware compared to some of the members here) and the Enfield is my favorite, the design is very modern and it seems to fit better than any other jacket I have. The older competition weight ones still pop up on ebay from time to time, it’s worth grabbing one if you can.

    This is also the last leather jacket I bought, which might be clouding my opinion a bit. Six months clean, whoop!
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018
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  19. Vanson Enfield in comp weight steer.

    20180416_182436.jpg
     

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