Buco J-100

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Wdawg, Sep 22, 2019.

  1. Wdawg

    Wdawg Familiar Face

    Messages:
    77
    You guys will all know that leather jackets are not exactly a profitable hobby. I've spent way more than I'd like to find out chasing eBay jackets etc.

    That karmic record got paid back in full when I saw this jacket come up for £60 BIN.

    No liner, no tag but it's gotta be that holy grail.

    buc1.jpg
    buc2.jpg buc3.jpg
    When it arrived it was dry as hell, slightly flaky in places but it's amazing how much difference a coat of conditioner makes and this jacket has loads of life left. That being said, it is need of some patching up.

    There is a hole in the chest where a small section has worn paper thin, the binding on one sleeve has rotted through and the thread has deteriorated in a few places.

    IMG_0820.JPG IMG_0822.JPG IMG_0824.JPG

    And amazingly enough, this thing actually fits.

    bucfit1.png bucfit2.png bucfit3.png

    So what do you guys think? Definitely a Buco right?

    Worth the probably costly repair job or try to flip? Does Aero repair jackets other than theirs because they'd be my first choice.

    Either way, I'm stoked about scoring it. Probably should give up on the Bay now and quit while I'm slightly less behind
     
    antoine p, technovox, Kuro and 12 others like this.
  2. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,757
    Location:
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    That certainly looks like a Buco. From the photos I can’t imagine it would be anything but a Buco. Too bad the snap at the collar isn’t one of the embossed with Buco type. That would’ve answered your question without a doubt. I would repair it and wear it.
    It’ll be hard to flip it for the $1k they can reach without a liner and tag. And for what you paid (and the fit you have) even harder to replace.
     
    sweetfights likes this.
  3. sweetfights

    sweetfights Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,380
    Location:
    Canada
    Keep. A huge win. Worth repairing and wearing.
    Looks good on you.
    It has all the elements of a Buco.
    Congrats!!
    How long was it on auction before you snagged it?
    Great score.
     
  4. lina

    lina Practically Family

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    594
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Yeah, nice fit!
     
  5. handymike

    handymike I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    SoCal
    Great score!
     
  6. ProteinNerd

    ProteinNerd My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
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    Looks great and what a price!

    I’d keep it as you would probably struggle getting a decent price with no tag.
     
  7. Mysteryo

    Mysteryo Practically Family

    Messages:
    786
    Location:
    Nantes (FR)
    And yes, you can send it to repair and restore to Aero, they already did a god job with 2 of my vintage jackets.
    Great score and undoubtely a Buco J100
    Keep it! Or sell it to me for the price you bought it ;-)
     
    AeroFan_07 likes this.
  8. Justhandguns

    Justhandguns Practically Family

    Messages:
    745
    Location:
    London
    It certainly looks exactly like the J100. 60quids is a bargain!
     
  9. MemphisBlues

    MemphisBlues One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Sorry to resurrect an old thread OP, but I had a similar situation.

    I picked up a Buco J-100 for $300 without a liner, tag, or embossed collar snaps, that looked exactly like yours. The original owner (super old school biker) used it to do motocross, swore up and down it was a Buco, despite no identifying marks. At the time, I didn't care. I thought to myself, "I'd love to have an original for cheap."

    After I wore it 4-5 times, the cotton thread started to break in some spots. I guess I flexed or did something stupid. But it happens. Bummer. Anyway, I ended up paying another $200 to have it stitched up at Johnson Leathers in SF.

    Unfortunately, the fit was a little off for me afterward, so I ended up selling it. I didn't know what I would get for it, but it eventually sold on eBay for $775. Not bad for an original Buco without tags. One of those rare moments where it is possible to flip and turn a profit with this hobby.

    One suggestion Alan gave me, and I'm sure others have heard similar things: you can always find a raggedy old Buco with the label still intact and have it removed and transferred to your jacket to complete the look. Some may say this is blasphemous, but if it's a Buco label on a Buco jacket, I don't see the issue.

    Anyway, if you're not interested in selling or maximizing the value, just fix the jacket so it's serviceable and enjoy the hell out of it.
     
  10. Blackadder

    Blackadder Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    China
    Replacing a label has certainly been done many times. Issue is the Buco label indicates whether the jacket is HH or Steerhide and unless you can ascertain the leather used on your jacket and securing the correct label, it is not just blasphemy, it may be fraudulent misrepresentation.
    I have a Buco J-100 with a steerhide label and a Buco J-24L without label is coming my way. I am guessing the J24L is also steerhide but I doubt I will ever test it for sure.
    My Buco J100 came with a replaced lining and main zipper. No hole or any other damage. Bought it because of its ready to wear condition. Not looking to flip it so actually happy with the repair already done to it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2020
  11. MemphisBlues

    MemphisBlues One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Yea, I get what you're saying. I don't want to suggest fraud is good or that anyone should be intentionally misrepresenting their jacket, presumably with the intention to inflate its perceived value.

    But, on the same token, I have boughten some vintage pieces from folks who, in some cases, were the original owners and wore them to hell and back. The original tag won't always be available, but the owner knows what they bought. And there are some folks who like having the tag. Maybe to re-sell the jacket at a higher price. Or maybe just for their own edification. Still, using a tag that is worn-like in appearance on a used jacket looks the part as opposed to slapping a brand new tag in there.
     
  12. Blackadder

    Blackadder Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,394
    Location:
    China
    I am not much of a trader when it comes to leather jackets. I just wear them and only sell if they don't fit. Tag may fetch a better price but I wouldn't pay the premium for it. As said my Buco J-100 has a label but it is also missing the original lining and zipper so I guess it doesn't really matter to me as long as it is within my budget which is a lot lower than what many traders wanna fetch. I have been looking at my Buco J-100 for over a month and there was zero interest so seller had to reduce the starting bid every week until I won it for a little over 400.
     
    handymike likes this.
  13. navetsea

    navetsea My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,624
    Location:
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    sofa restorer can do a lot more magic to patch hole and worn out spot than a jacket maker.
     
    tmitchell59 and MemphisBlues like this.
  14. MemphisBlues

    MemphisBlues One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Never thought of that. That’s worth checking into once everything goes back to normal. Thanks.
     
  15. MemphisBlues

    MemphisBlues One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Fair enough. I don’t particularly care about the tag for personal use either, but the longer I have been in this hobby, the more mindful I am that I won’t always keep every jacket I get. So, minimizing my loss, or maximizing my gain, becomes an important consideration.
     
    technovox likes this.
  16. dudewuttheheck

    dudewuttheheck Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,017
    That fit is so perfect. Looks like a Buco, but I am not a vintage expert enough to be sure.
     

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