Choice of lining for a cross-zip jacket

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by nattevagten, Aug 9, 2020.

  1. nattevagten

    nattevagten New in Town

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    Browsed through several old threads and got some useful advice, but I still feel a bit uncertain which lining to choose.

    Can anyone recommend a lining that is comfortable in both colder weather (3-5C) and also during summer (c. 17C)? I got the impression that non-insulated lining doesn't work in any extreme weather (say +30 or -10), yet there is a noticeable difference in how comfortable the lining is in the 5-20C range, so I'm wondering what's the most optimal choice or compromise here (if there is any!).

    Maybe go for light- or mid-weight wool lining? Or just cotton and wear something warm under the jacket for insulation when it's cold and hope it suffices?

    I only have experience with quilted lining, but this is too much for summer, even though I live in a colder climate.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Monitor

    Monitor

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    11,172
    I would always go with a quilted lining for a motorcycle jacket 'cause it sounds like it'd do just perfectly in the range of temperature you mention. I'd probably wear the jacket over just a T-shirt in 17C but I wouldn't find it too hot, that's for sure.

    But if you find the quilted lining too warm at 17C, problem is that simple cotton or polyester won't do in around 5C so yeah, I'd say a backed cotton lining or any heavier textile like a blanket or wool ought to do the job.

    Blanket lined Levi's or Lee jackets are wearable most of the year and that stuff is a great choice for a liner and has been used for like a hundred years for a reason.
    Problem with leather is, it gets as cold as the weather out there and it'll actually chill you out instead of keep you warm. Cold grabs on to it and you'll be freezing in it even in a sweater, if there isn't anything between you and the hide to keep the warmth inside. I find lightly lined leather jackets to be counter productive in the cold. Anything under 5C and I don't touch any of my jackets that don't have an insulated lining. But that's me.

    In short, mid-weight wool or a blanket or a backed polyester sounds good. You'll need that jacket to keep you warm once it gets cold, not to make you sweat on a warm day.
     
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  3. Peter Bowden

    Peter Bowden Practically Family

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    I like moleskin as a body lining.I would describe it as somewhere between cotton and wool tartan lining in terms of warmth and is more pleasant to touch in my opinion.Not very bulky either so layering is feasible.I have cotton sleeve linings though sateen is highly thought of.
     
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  4. nattevagten

    nattevagten New in Town

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    Yeah, that's what I was afraid of. As for wool, the customer service suggested Lochcarron. I'll ask them for further details. The black-dark green version looks fantastic and might do the trick.

    Thanks. I'll check if moleskin is available. As for sleeves - can't say I liked the feel of cotton that much (at least on Schott Perfecto 613), so sateen might be a good option. Also considered viscose military twill.
     
  5. roadking04

    roadking04 A-List Customer

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    I have to agree with @Monitor on the quilted lining. I have quilted linings in all my M/C jackets. I think they help A LITTLE in the cold and don't really get excessively hot. Over 80 degrees and it is too hot for leather regardless of the lining. Between 70 and 80, I ride with the jacket zipped to the collar snaps and the sleeve zips opened, plenty of air flow that way.

    I also prefer cloth lined pockets. When not in use, I open the chest and side pockets for just a little bit more air flow on warmer days when riding. Cant go wrong with a cross zip. Awesome functionality on a motorcycle.
     
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  6. nick123

    nick123 I'll Lock Up

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    I really love Locharron lightweight tartan. It's said to fray a bit quicker than drill, but it's lovely stuff. And the options. Worthy tradeoff in my opinion.

    also, Navajo blanket lol.
    DB67E32A-52F3-4393-B35A-7404FEF6070D.jpeg
     
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  7. Monitor

    Monitor

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    11,172
    Assuming you're talking to either Aero or SB, I didn't find any of their lightweight tartans to be any warmer than cotton drill. It's just as thick as cotton drill. The red/black checkered heavy tartan I had on my J was pretty warm, though.

    Cotton linings alone are even worse at keeping you warm than polyester/nylon since they breathe and don't really keep the warmth in.
     
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  8. Carlos840

    Carlos840 My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    IMO you are looking for something that doesn't exist.
    No lining that is warm enough for (3-5C) will work at (15-20C)
    Wool will be good down to 5C but it will turn your jacket into a sweat suite above 15C.
    Cotton will be good up to 15C but you will be cold at (3-5C)

    Basically you need one jacket with wool for the winter/fall and one with cotton for the spring/summer.
    If you can only have one, go for cotton and layer more when it is cold.
    Adding a removable fur collar will really help in winter.

    Edit: i have both the thinnest and thickest Locharron tartans in different jackets. The thin one is not warm enough for winter, but far too warm for summer. The thickest one (Strome) is noticeably warmer in winter, but still not enough in freezing conditions.
     
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  9. Harris HTM

    Harris HTM Practically Family

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    I own a variety of jackets, mainly Aero's, with various linings.
    In winter the light wool Lochcaron feels almost the same as cotton, it wears out much faster though.
    In the summer, however, the cotton one is far more comfortable, the wool one will make you sweat.
    The Alpaca lining will add warmth but not that much.
    The warmest lining you can get is shearling. This however will limit the wear only on cold winter days.
    If you go for the Lochcaron wool tartan, then ask for a corduroy strip on the waist. This will prolong the life of the lining.
     
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  10. nattevagten

    nattevagten New in Town

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    Yeah, that makes sense. Thanks. Considering it's barely three months when it gets warmer than 15C here, I'm not sure I can justify getting a cotton-lined jacket (at least at this point, when I don't have a good leather jacket for winter/fall). Looks like quilted lining might be the best option after all. Will give it some thought and consult with SB.

    To conclude, would you say wool is mostly good for 5-10C? And cotton, 10-15C? In broad terms..
     
  11. Carlos840

    Carlos840 My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I would say i agree.
    IMO wool isn't a great liner for a leather jacket, it is often not warm enough or too hot.
    I find i wear my cotton lined jackets far more often than i wear my wool ones.
    If it is 15C, i am going to wear a T shirt and a cotton lined leather jacket, wool lined would be too warm.
    If it is 10C i could wear a T shirt and a wool lined leather jacket, or i could wear a T shirt + wool jumper and a cotton lined leather jacket.
    IMO option 2 makes more sens as it gives me more options and is the reason i prefer the versatility of a cool lining.
    IMO quilting is a bit warmer than wool and is also not that versatile. For me quilted jackets only come out in winter, probably in the 0-5C range. They tend to breath less and i overheat faster in them.
     
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  12. mihai

    mihai One of the Regulars

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    Interesting subject.
    I partially agree with what's been said bc this thing is so subjective. We have each our own tolerances.
    I speak about casual wear since I don't ride.
    I think the most versatile lining is cotton drill/rayon/polyester. To me the quilted jacket feels too warm starting from 15 degrees C. Also in the winter that synthetic filling makes me overheat and sweat.
    How I wear the thin lining jackets depending on weather. For example my daily beater - A-2 repro - mid weight goatskin and cotton drill. I wear it from freezing -5, -10 C up to 15-20C.
    In winter from -10 - 0 I'll wear a mid weight wool sweater underneath. More fitted not to stretch the jacket. It does the job perfectly.
    from 0 - 10 - I'll wear a light turtle neck wool sweater. Keeps torso warm, keeps the neck warm without the need of bulky scarf.
    from 10 above the jacket is enough with only a cotton shirt.
    15-20 I'll wear a letterman jacket or a denim jacket if it gets warmer

    Another thing I noticed with some jackets styles like biker ones (without knitted bottom). In the winter the cold gets underneath and it gives an unpleasant sweaty chill. Happens so with my LW Trojan. Solution is a body fitted wool sweater.
    Speaking about leathers I find horsehide the least insulating leather, it gets as cold as stone. Cowhide is better, and goat even more.
    Ironically the most comfortable/practical winter setup is this cheap A-2 jacket and basic wool sweater. It beats all expensive/fancy jackets I own. Even walking a lot I don't sweat, it's light, practical.
    If it's winter and windy/blizzard then I need something to cover the lower body and then I'll take the M-69 coat: goat with some wool pile underneath. It's perfect for those extreme conditions.
    So the rest of the stuff is just for dressing-up :)
     
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  13. Monitor

    Monitor

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    11,172
    Oh yeah, I definitely agree that quilted, stuffed lining gets too hot on any temperature that might be considered as warm but it's easier to take the jacket off and cool down than to freeze all day just because the lining isn't warm enough. I've been there and come winter, the jacket just sits in the wardrobe and I just end up feeling miserable, having spent so much money on something I can't wear. So I'd always go for a warmer variant. I mean, the whole purpose of this particular garment is to keep you warm and protect you from bad weather. :)

    So here's my list...

    Negligible effect / least warm: Cotton, lightweight tartan, polyester/nylon (though nylon lining can get uncomfortably hot if you're moving a lot)

    Decent warmth, from 5C to 15C: Foam stuffed quilted lining, fleece backed cotton / polyester / wool, Alpaca, corduroy... Depends of course how heavy is the material that the lining has been bonded with. What else?

    Mega-warmth, 5C to anything under zero: Sheepskin / Shearling
     
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  14. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Cotton and lightweight tartan are barely different in terms of warmth in my experience. I think the cotton may be slightly warmer, I am still able to wear my jackets with wool at 18C to 23C but not the cotton ones. Cotton drill is more robust and wears better IMO.

    I would consider moleskin (like so many of the early German Leathers) and wear something warm underneath.
     
  15. nattevagten

    nattevagten New in Town

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    Any thoughts on Harris tweed at max 15C? Is it like other wool, in other words, perhaps a bit too warm or is it still manageable? I remember reading here somewhere that when used as a body lining, it tends to be on the thinner side, while also retaining warmth well enough.

    Cotton drill mentioned by mihai seems interesting as well if it keeps the body warm to a reasonable degree when worn with a wool sweater.

    Edit: I'd probably wear a coat if it's below 3-5C.
     
  16. I prefer to layer. Cotton drill lining is durable and works for me on warmer days on the bike. During cooler weather I have several slightly insulated vests to wear under my leather jacket. I always carry one in my saddle bags. However, I'm not too keen on riding my Harley when the temps slide much below 50 degrees.

    20190208_181209.jpg 20200228_152719.jpg

    In fact layering with a vest does real well off the bike during quite cold weather here in Indiana.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2020
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  17. lina

    lina Practically Family

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    Red quilted.
     
  18. Harris HTM

    Harris HTM Practically Family

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    I own a Teamster lined in tweed (not Harris tweed though). Significantly warmer than Alpaca. It is really itchy though. Keep in mind that tweed is a material that usually requires lining itself.
     
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  19. El Marro

    El Marro Call Me a Cab

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    I like cotton drill, rayon, or nylon for my MC jacket linings. I find these three hold up well and make the jacket easier to slip on and off. If it is cold then I will throw on a wool vest or shirt underneath the jacket. If it is too cold for that then I will wear a different jacket.
     
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  20. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Just realized you answered this yourself here. My winters are a mild 3C to 12C - cotton drill is perfect for that. If cold, a leather jacket is not the right garment anyway unless you layer as per HD's sensible recommendation. If the leather isn't too thick I can wear it up to around 23C is there is a breeze but it depends on sun intensity.
     
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