Fahey-Brockman

Discussion in 'Suits' started by tonyb, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    My mother's basement
    Any of y'all got an at-least-slightly informed opinion of the goods once sold through a (long-defunct, I think) chain called Fahey-Brockman?

    Their label keeps showing up in old ('50s and earlier) men's attire I stumble across at vintage and antique shops. What little research I've done seems to indicate that they were big in the Northwest. It appears they sold their house brand only (their garments bear no other labels that I've ever seen, anyway, other than the union tags in the interior pockets).
     
  2. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,302
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    Yeah, I'd already checked that out. The only mention of Fahey-Brockman is from a fellow (I assume) in Seattle who has all of eight posts here. He said that the Fahey-Brockman label appears in one of the suits in his collection. Beyond that, not much. Although it does add a bit more evidence that the chain once had a significant presence in this area.

    The name turns up on a few online vintage dealers' websites. (Not to paint with too broad a brush, but some of those folks apparently know very little about what they're selling, judging from what many of them say about their hats.)

    Old (like 1929 old) newspaper ads from Spokane leave the impression that Fahey-Brockman was (at that time) positioning itself as a lower-priced seller of higher-quality goods. But that's just advertising. I certainly wouldn't expect them to say their stuff was overpriced junk.
     
  3. jmacak

    jmacak New in Town

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    seattle, wa
    Hi

    Sorry about the low post count--I just don't feel that I have much that I can contribute to most conversations. (But, I have been sitting in this dark corner of the lounge for about three years, so I have seen a lot.)

    Anyway, I have a good number of F-B suits (6-7) and I can definitely say that they are pretty good quality. Nice materials and well put together.

    Being in the Seattle area, I see a fair amount of F-B suits, sports-coats, and overcoats and have not seen one that I would have turned down because of lower quality.

    I get the feeling that they went out of business before their quality had a chance to decline.

    Most of the items I have of theirs is from the late '50s to early-mid '60s.

    cheers

    -j
     
  4. tonyb

    tonyb I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,302
    Location:
    My mother's basement
    Please don't apologize, jmacak. If my post left the impression that I found any fault with your post count, please allow me to apologize.

    Thanks for the additional information. All the Fahey-Brockman-labeled stuff I've come across (including the sport jacket and overcoat in my own closet) seems of pretty high quality, although my assessment wouldn't be the most well-informed one.
     
  5. reetpleat

    reetpleat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,681
    Location:
    Seattle
    Hey Tony, how ya been. A little late to the party, but i found some info. THis thread came up in my search too I thought I would chime in. Sadly, this info is from an obit from 2011. Interesting life this guy lived.

    http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/seattletimes/obituary.aspx?pid=149997982

    George was born in 1910 at the Seattle house his grandfather built (John deGraaf). As a teenager, George shipped out as a Merchant Marine to China, Japan, the Philippines, and through the Panama Canal. At 19, he purchased property on Cypress Island at a county tax auction. George studied English at the University of Washington where he met Natus Collins (known as Johnny). Both pursued graduate work at the UW School of Social Work. Wed in 1937, they moved to St. Louis, where both had jobs in social work. Returning in 1939, they spent a year on Cypress before settling in Seattle. Son, Stephen, was born in 1940, Nicholas in '43, and Timothy in '44. Timothy died in 1948. Starting as a parole officer, George became Chief Parole Officer for the State of Washington. After his father's death in 1945, he and brother, Philip, took over Fahey-Brockman, the family's men's clothing business - with stores in Seattle, Portland, Denver, and Salt Lake City - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/seattletimes/obituary.aspx?pid=149997982#sthash.gD16Q7Na.dpuf
     
    tonyb likes this.
  6. reetpleat

    reetpleat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,681
    Location:
    Seattle

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