Favorite Swing Pieces?

Discussion in 'Radio' started by IndianaGuybrush, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. Chad Sanborn

    Chad Sanborn A-List Customer

    Messages:
    428
    Location:
    Atlanta, Ga
    Magic never ceases to amaze me. Everywhere I go someone is always interested in it, and it makes for a great icebreaker.
    I do know of JB Benn, and met Chappy Brazil once. Its a shame what happened to him. He was one of the greatest slight of hand guys in the world, and could steal your watch faster than you could blink!

    In the golden era, magic was the starting point for many famous people. That was during the nightclub era, when people dressed to the nines and went out dancing! A magician was often hired to do an act for about 30 minutes. One of my 'hobbies' is looking through all the old magic magazines from the era and reading about who was performing at the different high class social joints. Many of the magicians moved into acting from that exposure. Newspapers of the day, even had a 'magic column' so you could find a performer near you.

    Nowadays, like the rest of society, things moved to a 'grunge' look. David Blaine was the forerunner of this. With his monotone patter and gritty look. No laughter, no drama, just a guy doing card tricks. Which is fine, but I have always loved good theater.

    Make me laugh. Make me cry. Make me feel involved by toying with my emotions. In short, entertain me! That is what magic used to do. That's what I try to recreate in my own show.

    Chad
     
  2. Skywlkrinc

    Skywlkrinc New in Town

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    Location:
    Northern California
    Big Bad Voodoo Daddy also does a great rendition of "I Wanna Be Like You" from Disney's "The Jungle Book".
     
  3. Doctor Strange

    Doctor Strange I'll Lock Up

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    4,709
    Location:
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    Re less-elegant magic, don't forget Doug Henning and "The Magic Show" on Broadway circa 1971 - at the time, his working in a tee shirt vs. the standard full-dress suit or tuxedo was considered revolutionary. Of course, in the long run, it led directly to the likes of David Blaine...

    I'm another old magician, having been a practicing kids-party and lodge-meeting performer as a high school/college kid in the early 70s. I even forced my kid sister into becoming my "glamourous assistant" and split the proceeds 60/40 with her! I did all the standard small (and cheap) apparatus magic, and eventually worked myself up to pretty decent sleight of hand abilities with cards and coins. And I was often found prowling Lou Tannen's magic shop in Manhattan on weekends in those days; I even went to a couple of their magic weekends in the Catskills with my family.

    I gave up performing in the late 70s, but I still practice with cards from time to time. You can never get magic entirely out of your life once you've been initiated!
     
  4. IndianaGuybrush

    IndianaGuybrush One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    232
    Not to Hijack the thread but Tannen's is still a great place to hang out during the weekends in NYC, especially for the aspiring magician. I used to spend whole afternoons there throughout high school, and actually inquired about a job there once. Alas, I was too young ad underqualifies as a magician, but it was and is still a great place to be exposed to both new magic and the classics. Now if you gents will excuse me, I've got to dig up my old container of wax and polish up my old 'card on the ceiling' routine :cool:
     
  5. Wild Root

    Wild Root Gone Home

    Messages:
    5,532
    Location:
    Monrovia California.
    Well, I see only the mainstream swing oldies here. Any one know Gene Krupa’s “Let Me Off Up Town�? Or “Thanks For the Boogie Ride� sang by Anita O’Day? How about Gene Krupa’s solid sender “FIRE BALL�? Ever hear of these? If not, YOU MUST! They are the best! I also love Benny Goodman’s “All the Cats Join In�. As for big band music, I have been swing dancing for over 8 years now and I have been collecting tapes, CD’s and 78rpm records for about 10 years. I love all the standards but I’m really digging the rare and obscure songs from the big bands. Any one here like Chick Webb? That boy could beat some mean skins man! He was a house band at the famous Savoy club. He also had Ella Fitzgerald singing with him. Any one here like Fat’s Waller? Boy some of you guys have been missing out on the good stuff.

    My taste for Jazz and swing spans from 1925 to 1948. That’s it. No farther then that.

    The bands that I love are…

    Glenn Miller.
    Artie Shaw.
    Benny Goodman.
    Tommy Dorsey
    Jimmy Dorsey
    Harry James
    Chick Webb
    Fats Waller
    Count Basie
    Luis Jordan
    Spike Jones
    Erskine Hawkins
    Duke Ellington
    Bob Crosby

    The list does go on.

    Is there a way to post a music file? I would love to share some with you all.

    As for the song Power House mentioned early in the thread the arrangement you’re looking for is by Raymond Scott’s Orchestra. You can find the best album on CD on line I believe. Look on Google under Raymond Scott. I have his CD and it’s great! Just what you want.

    As for the Neo Swing stuff, not hep to that jive. I like Dean Mora’s Modern Rhythmists, Jonathan Stout’s big band, Bill Elliot.

    Look up all the artists I mentioned and the songs! You’ll love them! A bit of new sounds from the 40’s for your listening pleasure. I also love the live radio broadcasts from the 40’s! Great stuff.

    Root.
     
  6. Wild Root

    Wild Root Gone Home

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    5,532
    Location:
    Monrovia California.
  7. Chad Sanborn

    Chad Sanborn A-List Customer

    Messages:
    428
    Location:
    Atlanta, Ga
    Speaking of Gene Krupa, there is a group called Apollo 440. They are a modern, electronica style of music. Pumping out alot of 'club' music. But they did a tribute to Gene Krupa. The entire songs beat is layed down by the master. There is also a small audio clip that repeats that must have been taken from an old TV or radio show. It says, "Now back to Gene Krupas syncopated style".
    I am not one for too much of this kind of music. But the beat is truly entracing and makes the song tolerable.

    Chad
     
  8. IndianaGuybrush

    IndianaGuybrush One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    232
    Thanks Root, thanks to you guys here at the lounge my knowledge of period music has increased dramatically. I was recently able to tell a coworker that the piece we were listening to was 'String of Pearls' :)

    Also, thanks for the Raymond Scott CD link, I'll seriously consider picking it up.
     
  9. Wild Root

    Wild Root Gone Home

    Messages:
    5,532
    Location:
    Monrovia California.
    You're welcome man! Any time. I have that CD and I like it very much. It's fun music! Some that you can dance to and some that is just fun to hear.

    If you ever have any questions about music of the 30's and 40's pm me about it and I'll be happy to help you find some really good stuff.

    Root.

    For those Miller fans, here is a link to some of the best broadcasts from his war time work. Great songs and some that some of you haven't heard. Check out all the volumes! In these original radio broadcasts Glenn anouces most of the songs. It's cool to hear his voice! I have a few of these CD's and I love them!

    http://images.google.com/imgres?img...&hl=en&lr=&rls=GGLC,GGLC:1969-53,GGLC:en&sa=N
     
  10. swinggal

    swinggal One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,386
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    As a swing dancer of 6 and half years and a swing DJ of 2 and a half there is definate difference between what is good to 'listen' to and what is good to 'dance' too (Lindy Hop, Shag and Balboa). I love to both listen AND dance and have loved swing music since I was a kid. Here's some of my ideas for people interested in building up a swing collection for dancing to:

    The Lindy Hop is a solid, flowing, sensual Jazz dance that evolved with the Afro-American Jazz music of the late 20's and 30's. The dance is playful, sensuous, and fun - just like the Swing music of the 30's and early 40's. The dance and music evolved around one another and that is why early, swinging jazz music is what Lindy feels best to dance too. Late 40's mellow, easy listening big band orchestrations, such as American Patrol, just don't cut it. Great to listen too, but not to dance to.

    Nor does Jump Jive, R&B, R'N'R, Rockabilly, or post-WWII mellow lounge-listening music. Those are all great musical genres a in their own right, but they don't compliment the Lindy Hop. Some Jump Blues is ok but it just doesn't have a swing feel. Most "Neo Swing" (RCR, BVVD Brian Setzer etc) is really Jump Blues.

    Swing music has life, spirit, and pulse, and passion. It just gets inside you.
    It is about a strong flow, not about strong beat. One is good for dancing together harmoniously. The other encourages jerkiness and too much tension between the dancers. Swing *dancing* music is simple and solid. It is uncluttered, it breathes and rests. Listen to Setzer sing "Swingin' on Nothin'", and then listen to a Swing band swing it. No comparison ...It's all about style.

    Here are some of the best original swing bands to swing *dance* to (and listen of course if you dont dance):

    Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Fats Waller, Chick Webb, Erskine Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, Lucky Millinder, Benny Goodman, Andy Kirk, The Savoy Sultans, Lionel Hampton, Les Brown, Buddy Johnson, Woody Herman, Cab Calloway, Ella Fitgerald, Peggy Lee, Stan Kenton, Slim & Slam, Coleman Hawkins, Harry James, Anita O'day, Bunny Berrigan, Gene Krupa, Rex Stewart, Louis Jordan, Maxine Sullivan, Ella Mae Morse and more.

    Listening, well thats different. All these guys as well as Coleman Hawkins, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan, Glenn Miller, Louis Prima, The Andrews Sisters, Dean Martin, Artie Shaw, Mel Torme, Mildred Baily, Billie Holiday, Nat King Cole, Shore, Doris Day, Jo Stafford, Sidney Bechet, Tex Benneke, Helen Ward, June Christy, Bessie Smith, etc are all I listen to day in day out!!

    Good contemporary swing bands are the Lincoln Centre Jazz Orchestra, Barbara Morrison, Campus 5 and Bill Elliot.

    Listen to as much original swing as you can to develop your your skills as a dancer. Knowing the music well helps so much.

    Here's the last setlist I played recently at the Perth Lindy Exchange:

    Toadie Toddle - Andy Kirk
    All the cats join in - Benny Goodman
    John Hardie Wife - Rex Stewart
    Segue in C - Duke Ellington
    Fifteen Minute Intermission - Cab Calloway
    Softly as a morning sunrise - Artie Shaw
    'Aint Misbehavin' - Rex Stewart
    Betcha a Nickel - Ella Fitzgerald
    Shout Sister Shout - Lucky Millinder
    Bean Soup - Coleman Hawkins
    One O'Clock Jump - harry James
    Wishin' and a Cryin' over you - Savoy Sultans
    C-Jam blues - Lincoln Centre Jazz Orchestra
    Organ Grinders Swing - Buster Smith
    Sweet Little Headache - Helen Forrest
    Shiny Stockings - Count Basie
    Swingin' on Nuthin' - Harry James
    Sing, Sing, Sing - Benny Goodman
    Park at 106th - Duke Ellington
    Bearcat Shuffle - Andy Kirk
    Maxine Sullivan - Bli Blip
    Splanky - Count Basie
    Blow man Blow - Calvin Boze
    Lets get together - Duke Ellington
    Barn 12 - Harry James
     
  11. scotrace

    scotrace Head Bartender Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,212
    Location:
    Small Town Ohio, USA
    Thundering Herd

    I second that... For me, there are few songs that can make me want to get up and move Like Woody Herman's version of
    Caldonia.
    I saw him do it live while he was forced to tour to pay off the tax debt the ratsin-fratsin government hounded him for. The crowd kept calling for it, and he finally gave in and said, "well, alright, but you won't be able to dance to it!"
    Few tried, but we all grinned and hooted and clapped and had a great time.
    Woody Herman, as well as another personal favorite, Red Nichols, got short-changed in the Ken Burns Jazz documentary.
    If you can dance to Caldonia, at full beat.. well... I want to come see it, and clap for you, and buy you a drink.
     
  12. swinggal

    swinggal One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,386
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    Swing dancing and swing music

    As a swing dancer of 6 and half years and a swing DJ of 2 and a half there is definate difference between what is good to 'listen' to and what is good to 'dance' too (Lindy Hop, Shag and Balboa). I love to both listen AND dance and have loved swing music since I was a kid. Here's some of my ideas for people interested in building up a swing collection for dancing to:

    The Lindy Hop is a solid, flowing, sensual Jazz dance that evolved with the Afro-American Jazz music of the late 20's and 30's. The dance is playful, sensuous, and fun - just like the Swing music of the 30's and early 40's. The dance and music evolved around one another and that is why early, swinging jazz music is what Lindy feels best to dance too. Late 40's mellow, easy listening big band orchestrations, such as American Patrol, just don't cut it. Great to listen too, but not to dance to. Don't get me wrong, people danced - that is Foxtrotted, Waltzed, Two Stepped and Quick-stepped to them, but it wasn't really 'Jitterbug' music. It didnt 'swing like a gate'.

    Nor does Jump Jive, R&B, R'N'R, Rockabilly, or SOME post-WWII mellow lounge-listening music. Those are all great musical genres a in their own right, but they don't compliment the Lindy Hop. Some Jump Blues is ok but it just doesn't have a swing feel. Most "Neo Swing" (RCR, BVVD Brian Setzer etc) is really Jump Blues. These bands don't inspire me to get up and dance Lindy at all.

    Swing music has life, spirit, and pulse, and passion. It just gets inside you.
    It is about a strong flow, not about strong beat. One is good for dancing together harmoniously. The other encourages jerkiness and too much tension between the dancers. Swing *dancing* music is simple and solid. It is uncluttered, it breathes and rests. Listen to Setzer sing "Swingin' on Nothin'", and then listen to a Swing band swing it. No comparison ...It's all about style.

    Here are some of the best original swing bands to swing *dance* to (and listen of course if you dont dance):

    Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Fats Waller, Chick Webb, Erskine Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, Lucky Millinder, Benny Goodman, Andy Kirk, The Savoy Sultans, Lionel Hampton, Les Brown, Buddy Johnson, Woody Herman, Cab Calloway, Ella Fitgerald, Peggy Lee, Stan Kenton, Slim & Slam, Coleman Hawkins, Harry James, Anita O'day, Bunny Berrigan, Gene Krupa, Rex Stewart, Louis Jordan, Maxine Sullivan, Ella Mae Morse, Bob Crosby, Billy Eckstine and more I have forgotten.

    Bands who maybe didn't have as MANY dance tunes but still swung were Coleman Hawkins, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan, Glenn Miller, Louis Prima, The Andrews Sisters, Dean Martin, Artie Shaw, Mel Torme, Mildred Baily, Billie Holiday, Nat King Cole, Shore, Doris Day, Jo Stafford, Sidney Bechet, Tex Benneke, Helen Ward, June Christy, Bessie Smith.

    All the artists I've mentioned (and more) are what I listen to day in day out.

    Good contemporary swing bands are the Lincoln Centre Jazz Orchestra, Barbara Morrison, Campus 5, Moras Modern Rhythmists and the Bill Elliott Big Band - mainly because they SOUND like original swing bands.

    Listen to as much original swing as you can to develop your your skills as a dancer. Knowing the music well helps so much.

    Here's the last setlist I played recently at the Perth Lindy Exchange:

    Toadie Toddle - Andy Kirk
    All the cats join in - Benny Goodman
    John Hardies' Wife - Rex Stewart
    Segue in C - Duke Ellington (my alltime favourite)
    Fifteen Minute Intermission - Cab Calloway
    Softly as a morning sunrise - Artie Shaw
    'Aint Misbehavin' - Rex Stewart
    Betcha Nickel - Ella Fitzgerald
    Shout Sister Shout - Lucky Millinder
    Bean Soup - Coleman Hawkins
    One O'Clock Jump - Harry James
    Wishin' and a Cryin' over you - Savoy Sultans
    C-Jam blues - Lincoln Centre Jazz Orchestra
    Organ Grinders Swing - Buster Smith
    Sweet Little Headache - Helen Forrest
    Shiny Stockings - Count Basie
    Swingin' on Nuthin' - Harry James
    Sing, Sing, Sing - Benny Goodman
    Park at 106th - Duke Ellington
    Bearcat Shuffle - Andy Kirk
    Maxine Sullivan - Bli Blip
    Splanky - Count Basie
    Blow man Blow - Calvin Boze
    Lets get together - Duke Ellington
    Barn 12 - Harry James
    Beyond the Sea - Bobby the Sea
    Blitzkreig Baby - Una Mae Carlilse
    Boogie Woogie - Tommy Dorsey
     
  13. Wild Root

    Wild Root Gone Home

    Messages:
    5,532
    Location:
    Monrovia California.
    Well, you know a lot about music of the period sister! I agree on a lot of your pointes.

    However, I do feel that some of the bands you mentioned in the “Listening to list� got WAY short changed!

    Artie Shaw…. Major danceable music!!! I’ll tell you why. In the late 30’s, he really had a band that could drive and move! Songs like “Oh Lady Be Good� “Non Stop Flight� “Man From Mars� Traffic Jam� Softly as Sunrise� Calcutta� “Diga Diga Do� are all very strong danceable music. Now, you could Lindy to those songs, but most here in CA Balboa to those songs.

    Also, it may surprise you that even Glenn Miller had a few songs that really swung. Now, if you watch some of his movies, you’ll see what I mean. Orchestra Wives had some great music in it. Now, I hate to drag race into it but, what white kids and black kids back then danced to were some what different.

    Lindy Hop: The Lindy Hop came about in the late 20’s early 30’s really. It was king at the Savoy in Harlem. It soon danced it’s way over to California and took shape into something different. What lots of kids then in this part of the US called Lindy, it was Way smoother then what was going on the East. Today we call it Hollywood Lindy, or Smooth Lindy. This I have seen danced by famous dancers like Dean Collins, and Arthur Walsh. Ever see the Peet Smith Special called Groovy Movie? That has some great dancing in it!

    Also you mentioned the Andrews Sisters in the “Listening List� They did a lot of stuff you listen to, but what about Bounce me Brother with the Solid Four? Or Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy? There are some others I have on 78 that really are quite danceable.

    Any way, I guess we all have different tastes when it comes to swing music. The late 30’s and early 40’s was when this stuff was at its peak!

    All the best,

    Root.
     
  14. swinggal

    swinggal One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,386
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    As I said ALL these artists made swingin' tunes and yes, but the latter seem to be played A LOT more for Lindy at all the camps I have been too worldwide. I never said that the second group could 'not' be danced too. Of course they can! You are just unlike to be able to dance to every song, unlike the Savoy Sultans who played for dancers.

    'Bounce Me Brother with a Solid Four' is one of may favourite swing songs and I love Artie Shaw ...BUT even Artie didn't like his band being labelled as a 'swing band' and he detested 'Jitterbuggers', so he didn't have as many tunes to dance too as other bands. We also use a lot of these tunes to Balboa too.

    I know the history of Lindy Hop in all its forms have collections of all the footage you speak off and some good Aussie stuff too from the early 40s. I dance both Hollywood and Savoy, Balboa and Collegiate Shag, even though Perth is based in Savoy teachings, so I can feel the differences, yes. Oh, have 'Tabby the Cat' in my playlist which was a soundy starring Dean Collins. Love that tune!

    I'll edit my post slightly to get across what I meant.

    Thanks for the feedback! I am certainly no expert.
     
  15. feltfan

    feltfan My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,170
    Location:
    Oakland, CA, USA
    Louis Jordan and Carl Stalling

    Technically, the music you heard in the Bugs Bunny cartoons
    was by Carl Stalling. You can find it on "The Carl Stalling Project"
    parts 1 and 2. He licensed Raymond Scott's compositions and
    used them in longer pieces. Scott would have been horrified at
    being identified as "swing"- he didn't consider himself a jazz composer
    or band leader and did not allow improvisation.

    I know it's not really swing, but I recommend checking out
    Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five. There is a great 5 CD
    reissue on the JSP label for only around $25. Amazing stuff
    throughout. Jump, rock, whatever it was, it was great.
     
  16. Wild Root

    Wild Root Gone Home

    Messages:
    5,532
    Location:
    Monrovia California.
    Swinggal, it's good to have you here!!! Some one who knows Dean Collins! Have you seen Broom street? I believe that was a short with the Jack Teagarden band. Fun short with the whole band and some really great set design!

    Artie Shaw didn't only hate jitterbugs, he hated a lot of things! He was a bitter man for what ever reason. Sad, he just passed away on newyears eve I think it was. I believe his vinagar helped keep him alive for so long. He was one of the last Big Band leaders from the 30's and 40's we had.

    The big name bands like Miller, Shaw, James, Dorsey and the like, they played some hot stuff! But, they sure did play mostley sweet foxtrots and balads. Funny, every 78rpm record that I have that swings hard states on the lable that it's a "Foxtrot". This is because the turm "Jitterbug" wasn't all that great back then. Jitterbugs hung out in Juke Joints and bars dancing, drinking and getting in trouble. This wasn't looked at by America as a good past time. So, in order to sell more records, they just printed foxtrot just to make it sound nicer.

    Say, do you like Gene Krupa? I love his band from 1939 to 1942. Ever hear a song called Ball of Fire? Gooooooooood song! Or have you heard of Benny Goodman's All The Cats Join In? Some solid senders my friend!

    Keep the Jive alive!

    Root.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. swinggal

    swinggal One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,386
    Location:
    Perth, Australia
    Real 30s/40s Foxtrot is a great dance and was done by everyone at the time, even Jitterbuggers. My buddy from Zurich (the 20s to 40s Club guy) taught me the proper vinatge Foxtrot. Completely different from the ballroom Foxtrot of today and has quite a hoppy almost bal/shag feel to it. That's why all the old swing tunes on 78's lablelled 'Foxtrot' really do fit that style.

    I have quite an extensive 78's collection containing many of the big hits of the swing era (eg; Begin the Begiune, C-Jam Blues, One O'Clock Jump, Easy Does it, Sing, Sing, Sing, Ain't watcha do) and they are ALL labelled Foxtrot. I asked Frankie Manning about this once and he said it was also because Lindy Hop was seen as a 'fad' for a long time. But yes, teenage Jitterbuggers had the same bad rep and mosh pit dancers have now...hehe.

    I do like Gene Krupa. One of my dancing friends who is a drummer LOVES Gene. His house is a shrine! He has signed photos and a zillion cds and albums.
     
  18. Johnnysan

    Johnnysan One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,170
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    What a great thread...

    very informative! I've learned a ton and the play lists have all been outstanding. Nice job everyone!!

    Anything by Louis Prima is OK by me, but one of my personal favorites is "Five months, two weeks, two days." He really rips into the lyrical riffs. :cool:
     
  19. Biltmore Bob

    Biltmore Bob Suspended

    Messages:
    1,721
    Location:
    Spring, Texas... Y'all...
    Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys...

    Ahhh Yeesss!

    A lil' twin Texas fiddle and Tommy Duncan singin...

    House of Blue lights by Asleep at the Wheel...
     
  20. Vladimir Berkov

    Vladimir Berkov One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,291
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    While most of my collection of 78s runs towards 20's and 30's hot dance and jazz bands, I have a real fondness for mid-to-late 30's Benny Goodman. Artie Shaw's band of the same period was also excellent, although they didn't record quite as many of my favorite songs as Goodman's band did. In my opinion, the 40's swing (by most American bands) didn't have the sophistication of the 30's swing. Some of it was still good, but many of the bands changed their sound, changed their musicians, arrangements, etc to where they lost something in the process.

    I would add the following songs to the list of Goodman's essentials:

    Rosetta
    Stompin' at the Savoy
    Goody Goody
    Let's Dance
    Blue Skies
    Don't be that Way
    Remember
    It had to be You
    Goodbye
    You're a Sweet Little Headache (one of my personal favorites)
     

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