French Cuisine

Discussion in 'The Connoisseur' started by Smithy, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. Chas

    Chas One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,715
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Still looking for a French girl who digs the sax and likes to cook. If I find her, you will never hear another complaint from me. Unless she refuses to cook French, of course.
     
  2. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    Them's slim pickings here in the States; you might what to go where they grow'em. ;)
     
  3. olive bleu

    olive bleu One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,667
    Location:
    Nova Scotia
    No BLUE NUN please :D
     
  4. Mr. Bingley

    Mr. Bingley Familiar Face

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    NJ
    Many moons ago my Bride and I took advantage of Granma Baby Sitting, LLC., to go into Manhattan and have dinner at Le Perigord.

    For my appetizer I had the seared Foie Gras and I totally splurged by washing it down with a split of '88 d'Yquem. Words can not describe how divine that was.
     
  5. And now I'm drooling....... it sounds wonderful :)
     
  6. LordBest

    LordBest Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Australia
    I dream of sampling Chateau d'Yquem. The closest I've got is Chateau Rieussec, the vineyard of which is literally next door to that of d'Yquem. It is considered second only to d'Yquem, but a distant second. To say I am envious would be understatement.
     
  7. Puzzicato

    Puzzicato One Too Many

    I've been lucky enough to try both d'Yquem and Rieussec. The Rieussec does come second, but I wouldn't called it "distant". Maybe I never had one of the really sublime vintages of d'Yquem?
     
  8. Mr. Bingley

    Mr. Bingley Familiar Face

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    NJ
    I just completely totally adore sauternes. luckily i realize that i can not afford to feed this addiction! :D
     
  9. Oldsarge

    Oldsarge One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,440
    Location:
    On the banks of the Wilamette
    Here in the South Bay, we've had a couple of French restaurants but none of them really lasted. I think it's related to the fact that a lot more Southern Italians immigrated to the U.S. (or at least the West Coast) than did the French.

    However, the Mrs and I took a river cruise up the Rhone a couple of years ago and were positively enchanted with the French countryside. Paris is simply another big city (though with better than usual food) but there is no overstating the charm of the countryside. Personally, I prefer Normandy and the Alsace to Provence. The cuisine of the last seems like a pretentious attempt to re-do Italy, though I know that's unfair. After all both Savoy and Provence share so much in the way of mobile population and, at times, governments that it would be strange if they weren't similar. And I share the enthusiasm for brassieries. We were fortunate enough to stumble on Le Coupoule the second night we were in Paris. If we get back there some day we will likely eat no where else! And a little place in Honfleur served the most exquisite seafood . . .
     
  10. LordBest

    LordBest Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Australia
    This is comforting. I love sauternes but I'm hardly an expert (or even vaguely knowledgeable), I just go what more learned wine enthusiasts have told me. Some of the local wine dealers are offering half bottles of d'Yquem for 'only' $200AUD, apparently quite a bargain.

    Mr Bingley, you might try De Bortoli Noble One Botrytis Semillon. It is an Australian sauternes style wine that is really excellent and a fraction of the price.
     
  11. Haversack

    Haversack One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,149
    Location:
    Clipperton Island
    San Francisco has had an organized and well-established French Community almost from the start of it becoming a city. Between September and December of 1848, over 20 ships arrived here directly from France. By 1852, the French vied with the Chinese and Australians in having the largest foreign contingent in the city. Many of these émigré's became very successful not in the gold fields but in running restaurants, hotels, laundries, and as merchants. Hence, San Francisco has had a familiarity with French Cuisine which continues to this day.

    Many of the city's neighborhoods have small French restaurants, brasseries, and bistros that thrive on local patronage. A couple examples of these are: Chapeau, in the Richmond: http://www.chapeausf.com/ and Chez Maman, on Potrero Hill: http://www.chezmamansf.com/menu.html.

    There are also destination French restaurants here as well. One of the best is La Folie on Polk Street on the west slope of Russian Hill. http://www.lafolie.com/ A family-run operation, Rolland Passot is the owner and chef. His wife, Jamie runs the front of the house. His brother George is the sommelier. The first time I ate dinner here was a revelation.

    The largest concentration of French eateries, (along with the French consulate, French Roman Catholic Church, and several Franco-phone hotels), is today found along Bush Street on the east slope of Nob Hill. (From about Mason Street down to Montgomery). A few of these are:

    The Jeanne D'Arc in the basement of the Cornell Hotel. http://www.cornellhotel.com/jeanne/index.shtml Not avant-garde but very competent traditional Lorraine cuisine. Not on foodie radar. Reasonable prices for the area. I would say that regularly almost half the customers are Francophones.

    Le Central is not Francophone but has a good atmosphere. A lot of regulars. House wines, the cassoulet, and the onion soup are to be recommended. http://www.lecentralbistro.com/

    Cafe Bastille is down an alley filled with other eateries. It has very hearty bistro fare, is Francophone, and is a nice place to sit outside for a late lunch. http://www.cafebastille.com/

    Note: From the 1850s to about the 1950s, the term, "French Restaurant" had a particular meaning in San Francisco. Typically, these restaurants served French cuisine and had at least three floors and often had separate entrances for the first three floors. The ground floor was perfectly respectable and one could bring one's wife and family. The second floor featured small, private dining rooms which in addition to a table and chairs featured a chaise lounge, a door that could be secured and a buzzer to summon the waiter. The third+ floors was an outright bordello. The most famous of these restaurants, the Poodle Dog also had a banquet hall on a sixth floor that could accommodate particularly large but discrete parties. The hall had a space from which a band could play music without seeing anything in the hall. This bit of history got reintroduced to people back in the 1990s. One of the French restaurants which went back to the 1860s was having its building seismically retrofitted after the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. In the basement, the workmen found stacks of old mattresses and questions publicly arose about why would a restaurant need to have such items.
     
  12. Mr. Bingley

    Mr. Bingley Familiar Face

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    NJ
    I'll take a look for it, thanks!

    The Bonny Doon vin de glaciere used to be a pretty tasty, reasonably priced sauterne style wine.

    I've developed an affection for Tokajii Aszu wines from Hungary. They have a very concentrated raisin character (unlike the crisp honey of the Sauternes) and at $40 or so for 500ml are much more "reasonably" priced.
     
  13. Steven180

    Steven180 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    269
    Location:
    US
    I think Nicolas Sarkozy nabbed her...

    M.
     
  14. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    Carla Bruni is French?
     
  15. Steven180

    Steven180 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    269
    Location:
    US
    I stand partly directed...she grew up in France but is Italian born. My apologies, another wrinkle in my brain. Tomasso, thank you Sir.

    We are still talking about cuisine right?

    M.
     
  16. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    I can hardly wait for cassoulet season.



    [​IMG]
     
  17. Do you have a good recipe for that Tomasso??
     
  18. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    Sure, but I'm a bit like Coca-Cola when it comes to my recipes....:cool:
     
  19. New recipe all the time?
    Share anyway... pretty please :)
     
  20. fortworthgal

    fortworthgal Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,646
    Location:
    Panther City
    I second that!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.