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Golden Age Mini-Series

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
Gentry continued:


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Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
While, being a traditionalist, I want the hood permanently affixed to my duffle coat, I still found this to be a very enjoyable ad to read:
View attachment 318480

Glad you enjoyed it!

Any coat I wear might be construed a duffer's coat! ;)

Note the very ample cut allowing its use to cover just about anything, unlike most modern interpretations.

Assuming the ad dates around '53, this coat sold for around $195 in today's money.
 

Tiki Tom

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,593
Location
Oahu, North Polynesia
I’m of the traditionalist school that doesn’t like hoods at all! :D That said, one of the thing I like about this time-machine of a thread, is that it points out to me that there were some pretty bold styles back then. (Patterned trousers, funky shoes, knickers.) Much riskier than I would have thought the 50s to be. Some pretty crazy stuff, really. I approve.... even if I wouldn’t wear some of it personally. :cool:
 

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
I’m of the traditionalist school that doesn’t like hoods at all! :D That said, one of the thing I like about this time-machine of a thread, is that it points out to me that there were some pretty bold styles back then. (Patterned trousers, funky shoes, knickers.) Much riskier than I would have thought the 50s to be. Some pretty crazy stuff, really. I approve.... even if I wouldn’t wear some of it personally. :cool:

Some of it is still around in one form, or another.

And while the term bold suits many of the fashion innovations of the period, odd might also be applied to some. I vividly remember the mid-'50's fad for the Ripple Sole. More than just a descriptor, it was a specific sole with its own distinct characteristics. :D


ripplesole.jpg


https://welldresseddad.com/2015/03/17/ripple-soles-fun-function/

While soles of similar appearance can still be found, they are usually confined to brawny outdoor boots, and such. Whereas the original version also appeared on rather dressy derbies, or sometimes, even oxfords. And unlike a harder rubber compound such as Dainite, or Vibram, these soles were squishy, with a texture not much firmer than EVA. This along with their design is what contributed to the floating sensation when walking in them. When striding, the foot you planted would be propelled forward a bit. But as physics require, a bit of what propelled you forward would be spent at the foot from which you pushed off.

When having shoes resoled during this fad, I decided to try some out. And while the slightly odd sensation when walking was entertaining. the more rapid rate of wear was not. But the one characteristic for which these soles were the unchallenged champion was their ability to track copious amounts of debris, both large and small, into one's home, which earned them the hatred, and eventual banishment by my mother. :D

 

Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
It has been fun posting these short series of images. I attempted to gather them all, though stored non-systematically within my non-searchable archive. I'm sure I've left some out, and there are probably others still tucked away that I missed. In the future, should I locate more, I'll add them. But for now, I've saved what are among my favorites for last. They look somewhat similar to the larger series posted at the beginning of this thread from Chicago Woolen Mill's 1937 catalog, and may be by the same illustrator, and though similar in style, these seven illustrations evoke an even stronger Art Deco mood.


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Flanderian

Practically Family
Messages
833
Location
Flanders, NJ, USA
View attachment 338491
That single buttoned suit on the left, I've got to have that. Looks like George will be getting a visit soon.

That suit is drop-dead sharp! :cool:

Will you also request besom pockets?

In the 90's I had my tailor make a single breasted peak lapel suit on two separate occasions, though they were both 2-button. When he was a young lad from Calabria he had gone to Rome in the '50's to apprentice as a cutter with his uncle and learn the profession. When I approached him with my request, he was a little nonplussed as he hadn't been cutting SB peak lapel jackets. But he none-the-less produced two very nice suits, a lighter grey sharkskin in a cloth from Scabal, and a midnight blue birdseye with a hand like water.

By the late 90's he had become ill and retired, and his shop, minus its inventory of cloth, and its equipment, remained empty and very much as it had been. Not long after it was put to a different use, serving a slightly different clientele. :eek: True story.


 
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GHT

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,312
Location
New Forest
That suit is drop-dead sharp! :cool:
Will you also request besom pockets?
The first time that I came across the term besom pockets was when the tailor, who was making my formal dinner jacket, (tux) asked me the same. He explained that besom pockets, are pockets that are cut into a garment, rather than being sewn on. They generally have reinforced edging or piping along the slit of pocket as seen here on my jacket.
Besom-Pockets.jpg
I have since heard that besom pockets have no flap. My assumption on a non besom pocket is that it is a non integral pocket, similar perhaps to the rear pockets on a pair of jeans. However, when it comes to the minutiae of the details, George is an authority. My intention is to have the suit made, as is. Great thread by the way, you would get on well with my tailor.
 
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