Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds
  • The Fedora Lounge is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

Hats With Musical Instruments

humanshoes

One Too Many
Messages
1,443
Location
Tennessee
I had Geddy for several years played the heck out of it, bit I never fell in love with that thin neck. It just couldn't handle high tension flats.
That's why I've gravitated away from building those stick neck jobs. It's not as easy to put a proper neck on a cigar box instrument, but infinitely more playable.
 

Kane

One of the Regulars
Messages
120
Location
Southern California
Cool thread.
Here’s an older Borsalino (thanks, Harry!) with my ‘33 Conn tenor:

3730E9E1-6BD7-4B3A-A3B6-AAE5D4F7108F.jpeg
 

Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
9,712
Location
Minnesota, USA
I got home later last night from work and sat with a guitar on the porch for an hour. A hat kept my head warm and comfortably while the guitar and I worked over some acoustic blues songs. I ended up "Satisfied, ticked too" (Miss.John Hurt lyrics). Immersed in the acoustic music I had no vexations or annoyances. Here are a couple older pictures.

i-s6htd5g-M.jpg


i-8NSfDgt-M.jpg


Best, Eric -
 
Last edited:

humanshoes

One Too Many
Messages
1,443
Location
Tennessee
I just finished repairing and restoring this early 1900's parlor guitar. I took great care not to compromise the 100+/- years old patina. To me, it's the kind of beauty that can only come from a very long and well lived life. Paired with my Milan straw planter's hat, it's now ready for some serious summertime blues.

1900's Parlor with Milan Planter Hat.jpg
Karma Then and Now.jpg
 
Messages
17,715
I just finished repairing and restoring this early 1900's parlor guitar. I took great care not to compromise the 100+/- years old patina. To me, it's the kind of beauty that can only come from a very long and well lived life. Paired with my Milan straw planter's hat, it's now ready for some serious summertime blues.

View attachment 171193 View attachment 171194
How does it sound? Did you have any cracks to clad? I still have the first guitar I had as a kid, a Slingerland May Bell Parlor size. It was probably 45-50 yrs old when I got it. The tuners were always crap & the frets look like copper rod. It's never been properly humidified & stored all these yrs, it has so many cracks it's coming apart. Yet I hang on to it.
 

Desert dog

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,291
Location
California
I just finished repairing and restoring this early 1900's parlor guitar. I took great care not to compromise the 100+/- years old patina. To me, it's the kind of beauty that can only come from a very long and well lived life. Paired with my Milan straw planter's hat, it's now ready for some serious summertime blues.

View attachment 171193 View attachment 171194
Nice! It is so good to see old instruments brought back to life, and hear their voice after a long silence.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

humanshoes

One Too Many
Messages
1,443
Location
Tennessee
How does it sound? Did you have any cracks to clad? I still have the first guitar I had as a kid, a Slingerland May Bell Parlor size. It was probably 45-50 yrs old when I got it. The tuners were always crap & the frets look like copper rod. It's never been properly humidified & stored all these yrs, it has so many cracks it's coming apart. Yet I hang on to it.
It sounds great now Jack. Warm and mellow with no buzzing or dead frets. It sure had plenty of cracks and one major hole to repair before, though. It came to me as a lost cause that was considered only suitable for a "wall hanging", but I thought it still had good structural integrity and definitely worth saving. It's funny, I played a May Bell when I was kid. My aunt bought it for me and I hated it. Now I wish I had it back.



Parlor Surgery.jpg
 
Messages
17,715
It sounds great now Jack. Warm and mellow with no buzzing or dead frets. It sure had plenty of cracks and one major hole to repair before, though. It came to me as a lost cause that was considered only suitable for a "wall hanging", but I thought it still had good structural integrity and definitely worth saving. It's funny, I played a May Bell when I was kid. My aunt bought it for me and I hated it. Now I wish I had it back.



View attachment 171260
You did a great job with it. I think my grandpa paid $8 for the May Bell for me. Even then it was a luxury for us. As I got bigger I used to play it across my lap as a slide guitar since it was parlor size. I'll have to look at it to see if it is even worthy of some pics at this point.
 

humanshoes

One Too Many
Messages
1,443
Location
Tennessee
You did a great job with it. I think my grandpa paid $8 for the May Bell for me. Even then it was a luxury for us. As I got bigger I used to play it across my lap as a slide guitar since it was parlor size. I'll have to look at it to see if it is even worthy of some pics at this point.
Thanks Jack. I'd love to see some pics of your Slingerland. I suppose you know that those old guitars that we considered crap back in the day are fetching premium money these days. Who'd a thought.
 
Messages
17,715
Thanks Jack. I'd love to see some pics of your Slingerland. I suppose you know that those old guitars that we considered crap back in the day are fetching premium money these days. Who'd a thought.
I take some better pics with hats tomorrow. This is just the headstock. It has the black fiberboard pick guard. I still have a thumb pick made from an "exotic sea creature".

IMG_4085.jpg
 

Forum statistics

Threads
107,649
Messages
3,043,508
Members
53,014
Latest member
IGDS
Top