Hiking food.

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by botty, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. Heeresbergführer

    Heeresbergführer Familiar Face

    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    The Mountains of Life
    Grüß Di' Reno Kid,

    Here's a period Knorr ad from a 1933 Swiss Alpine Club magazine "Die Alpen."


    20130615_DieAlpen1933June_006.jpg



    Horrido!

    Patrick



     
  2. DavidJones

    DavidJones One of the Regulars

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    177
    Location:
    Ohio
    Knorr Erbwurst can still be obtained today. I have ordered it from online German grocers, as well as from Ebay. I use it for long weekend hiking trips and backpacking.
     
  3. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Cobourg
    A traditional food of voyageurs and arctic explorers is Pemmican. From The Canadian Encyclopedia

    "Pemmican [Cree pimikan, meaning "manufactured grease"] is dried meat, usually BISON, pounded into coarse powder and mixed with an equal amount of melted fat, and occasionally saskatoon berries or other edibles. Cooled and sewn into bison-hide bags in 41 kg lots, pemmican could be stored and shipped with ease to provision FUR-TRADE personnel. Peter POND is credited with introducing this vital food to the trade in 1779, having obtained it from the CHIPEWYANS in the Athabasca region. Later, posts along the Red, Assiniboine and north Saskatchewan rivers were devoted to acquiring pemmican from the Plains Indians and MÉTIS. Pemmican was also made and used outside the region, eg, by the Royal Navy, which provisioned several arctic expeditions with beef pemmican made in England. "

    Especially good for hard working travellers in cold climates, like voyageurs paddling a canoe 8 hours a day.

    If you want to try it there are recipes on the net. Basically dried beef ground up and mixed with animal fat. You can add dried fruit, salt , pepper and spices if you like.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  4. bburtner@moran

    bburtner@moran Banned

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    Location:
    The Empire State
    Sound`s like it would constipate you.
     
  5. dh66

    dh66

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    down south
    Personally, when I'm in poison ivy and poison snake territory I like to keep my pants up as much as possible anyway.

    Sent from my SGH-T959V using Tapatalk 2
     
  6. Hunter_aka_Scotty

    Hunter_aka_Scotty One of the Regulars

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  7. Dragon Soldier

    Dragon Soldier One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    I take a mix of plain flour, bicarbonate of soda, salt and dried milk powder. Added to enough water to make a "flappy" dough, this is a mixture for Irish soda bread.

    No oven needed* this bread can be cooked in a pan or on a griddle and it will rise all on its own. You can add fruit or syrup/molasses for a sweet bread, or chillies/herbs/spices for something savoury.... Or just leave it plain. It's a really simply, basically leavened bread mixture.


    * it can be baked in an oven which gives a very different, hard, crust.
     
  8. Renault

    Renault One Too Many

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    1,688
    Location:
    Wilbarger creek bottom
    Almost but not quite like bannock bread! Wife used to always make soda bread.

    While on the subject, my young son always makes up a big batch of biltong when we are getting ready for a trip to the woods. Beef, venison, elk, nilgai, we've eaten it all. I much prefer it over standard jerky. Much easier on my ancient and abused choppers!
     
  9. green papaya

    green papaya One Too Many

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    1,243
    Location:
    California, usa
    dried fruits & nuts, bottled water, burittos, brownies, crackers, cookies, grapes
     
  10. CaramelSmoothie

    CaramelSmoothie Practically Family

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    Location:
    With my Hats
    I heard some of them had eaten a soup made of prunes, garlic and onions.


    Trader Joe's makes a cookie called Druids. They are oatmeal and walnut cookies made with whole wheat flour. They're soft and chunky and fills you up really well.
     
  11. Renault

    Renault One Too Many

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    1,688
    Location:
    Wilbarger creek bottom
    Actually those Druids sound pretty good!
     
  12. DavidJones

    DavidJones One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Ohio
    I'm going to have to look for those Druid cookies next time i'm at Trader Joe's
     
  13. Macbeth

    Macbeth One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Louisiana
    Hawk's Vittles makes some magnificent freeze dried gourmet foods!! Very affordable too.
    I don't usually eat dried food but this guy is a chef that makes his own. Never found anything better.
     
  14. Tomtheantiquarian

    Tomtheantiquarian New in Town

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    NW Wyoming
    Fresh pemmican is available online in several different variations. The same purveyor sells beef and lamb tallow for those who wish to make their own. I disovered this from a Wikipedia article which mentions it, but does not link it. Amazon has products called pemmican; however, they contain no animal fat. I did find what looks to be a reasonable recipe so I'll append a link to it as well.

    Bradford Angier, wilderness survival writer of yesteryear, discusses it and recommends it. His books are useful for the wilderness traveler who eschews modern synthetics in favor of wool, and who prefer a better time in general. His books are mostly still in print.

    Tallow itself makes a useful food. In Two Years Before the Mast, Charles Dana mentions the fondness of Russian sailors for straight tallow.

    My mother told me of eating pemmican at, of all places, the Canadian Pacific Hotel in Banff. It seems that a rather flamboyant remittance man who had spent some time in the bush decided to provide a treat for the hotel guests. He had the staff make the pemmican while he supervised. This was probably about 1925.

    http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Categories.bok?category=Paleo+Favorites

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

    http://historicaltrekking.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=403&sid=c3a4cb8fbe056d6b5723c0dd650d7e96

    http://smile.amazon.com/How-Stay-Al...+survive+in+the+wilderness&pebp=1418960372802
     
  15. Stanley Doble

    Stanley Doble Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,808
    Location:
    Cobourg
    For traditional fare try Purity products from Newfoundland Canada. Sailors, fishermen and travelers in the Canadian arctic and maritime provinces still use hard tack, pilot biscuits, dried fish and other staples. This is where they get them.

    http://www.purity.nf.ca/
     
  16. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,598
    Location:
    Germany
    Erbswurst is still in production.
    If I will see it one day in a supermarket, I will grab it. I like to test it, believe me!
     
  17. DavidJones

    DavidJones One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    Ohio
    Yes, I have bought Erbswurst from E bay. Great stuff to have in your kit when you need a hot soup brew up on a cold days hike.
     
  18. The Reno Kid

    The Reno Kid A-List Customer

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Back in the Biggest Little City
    Since my original post, I have realized that Erbswurst is a standard item in most German grocery stores...
     
    lefty12 likes this.
  19. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,598
    Location:
    Germany
    It's a standard-item, yes. But not available in the most supermarkets. Usually, only the big supermarkets got it.
     
  20. greatestescaper

    greatestescaper One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    293
    Location:
    Fort Davis, Tx
    This thread reminded me that historically folks in the late 19th century canned just about everything they could think of. A local museum curator was going through old collections when he stumbled across the worst smell of his life. A can of pressed chicken from the late 1880s had opened. That's right. The whole chicken, the feet, the head, and everything in between pressed and canned. It must have been horrible even when it was fresh.

    There seem to be great ideas here. I've been helping a friend with some field work in a very remote region of West Texas. We're out where there's little more than rattlesnakes and buzzards, on the far reaches of the Big Bend National Park. The staple food for us is dried sausage, bread, hard cheese, and at least a gallon of water per person.
     

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