On yer bike!

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by Mike1973, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. DanielJones

    DanielJones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,042
    Location:
    On the move again...
    Where can I find one of these?
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    Sure would make you concentrate on keeping your balance though.

    But seriously I wouldn't mind coming across an old German military bicycle. Even if it was to restore it.
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    Cheers!

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2010
  2. jeep44

    jeep44 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    252
    Location:
    Detroit,Mi
    You don't have to go Axis-there is always the Allies.... Here's my wartime BSA folding paratrooper bicycle. This photo is just after I finished restoring it a few weeks ago, and I had not put the chain back on yet.

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  3. DanielJones

    DanielJones I'll Lock Up

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    Very well done, I like it!:eusa_clap All it needs now is a rack and some panniers. So, did it originally have pad breaks on it or was that something you added? Just curious as how long that style of break has been around.

    Cheers!

    Dan
     
  4. jeep44

    jeep44 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    252
    Location:
    Detroit,Mi
    Yes, it originally had the British style of pad brakes on it,as made by BSA. These bikes were envisioned to be a way for airborne troops and commandos to advance rapidly to their objectives, and as such, are sort of a disposable bike-no panniers, or even a center stand or kickstand. No fenders,either-a very minimal bicycle. I don't have a photo, but I have a reproduction canvas bag which was designed to fit in the large center area of the frame to hold gear. There was also a backpack frame that was usually strapped to the handlebars to carry the rider's pack.
     
  5. DanielJones

    DanielJones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
    On the move again...
    Very interesting. It is alway neat to know the history of an item especially a war time history.

    Cheers!

    Dan
     
  6. JeffOYB

    JeffOYB Vendor

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Michigan
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    My "League of Extraordinary Peddlers" costume this year. I wore a huge black cape on several costume rides. But I forgot it in this pic so I lamely photoshopped it in.
     
  7. 'I'm off to this early tomorrow, not the perfect time for Tweedishnes, ( Late Spring , in the Antipodes) as a fellow lounger has pointed out, but a splendid opportunity to meet fellow T.T's'

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    It will involve taking the Bike on a 30 Minute train trip to the Lovely Port Town of Fremantle


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    I won the "Penny Farthing Award" Best Vintage Bicycle $200.00 Voucher for use at Mercers Bike Shop in Fremantle
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  8. Lefty

    Lefty I'll Lock Up

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    O-HI-O
  9. KittyAnneMalloo

    KittyAnneMalloo Familiar Face

    Messages:
    83
    Location:
    Country Vic, Australia
    bikes and cars?

    Hi uys,
    I'm hoping you can help me. I am in the process of restoring a '50 Morris oxford and I have a repro vintage bike that eventually I would like to take on drives to ride around the towns once I get there. How did they transport bikes in the 40's and 50's? Just your basic bike rack? I just would like it to look authentic if you know what I mean?
    Thanks heaps:eusa_clap
     
  10. BellyTank

    BellyTank I'll Lock Up

  11. JeffOYB

    JeffOYB Vendor

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Michigan
    I did a REALLY hard bike race yesterday, the Barry Roubaix, one of a recent crop of Paris Roubaix commemorative events, and a sweet one, indeed.

    35 miles of mostly dirt roads and two-tracks. Dozens of huge hills. Very scenic. Western Michigan.

    One THOUSAND riders entered in the event in the 3 distance options (23, 35, 65 miles).

    It was 20degF, sunny and dry at the start.

    I finished mid-pack on my 30-yr-old Trek 613 touring bike, in 2 hrs 14 mins. I wore vintage wool jerseys (layered) and knickers.

    So...

    ...A little guy blazed past me and finished in 2 hrs ONE minute. He finished ahead of a HUNDRED hard-core team bike racer folks on new carbon bikes and such.

    ...He was wearing an army helmet, riding a one-speed with a coaster brake.

    ...It was an original 1922 Iver Johnson.

    I vote it as coolest bike of the race.

    (He works at a bike company. I found a pic of his bike online.)

    iver.best.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011
  12. [video=youtube;GSM2Fz_xo4o]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSM2Fz_xo4o&feature=related[/video]

    I have just had some proper brakes put on my delivery bike, I feel so much safer

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    Last edited: May 31, 2011
  13. marxalot

    marxalot New in Town

    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX (again)
    I love the look of vintage bikes but could never take the sheer weight-- my father is a cycling enthusiast, and just some of his frames from the 40s and 50s were heavy enough to drive me into the arms of more modern alloys and methods. That said, the peripherals (Brooks leather saddles, proper handlebar wraps, functional clothing) from the earlier era are, to my mind, far superior to the overly technologized stuff we get these days. After all, when I go cycling, it's usually to get somewhere or to enjoy myself, not to win time trials. Some of these photos are just fantastic, and the vintage (and vintage-style) cycling gear is just the sort of thing I like. Recently even dug up a few patterns and some decent fabric with the idea of making myself a few pairs of plus-fours and a couple lightweight jerseys. The real issue with getting the genuine vintage stuff (other than cost, size, and availability, anyway...) is that it's frankly all wrong for the climate I'm in. Both my hometown of Ft Worth, TX, and my new city of Washington DC are hot and humid, and when it's 90 degrees F and 95% humidity, the last thing you want to be wearing is wool. At that point, I sacrifice authenticity for practicality. That doesn't mean I'm all lycra, though-- that stuff looks and feels awful! It's for me a nice linen shirt and roomy shorts, thank you very much.
     
  14. Heeresbergführer

    Heeresbergführer Familiar Face

    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    The Mountains of Life
    Grüß Di' Kameraden,

    Here are a few shots of my 1936 Truppenfahrrad:

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    Also have an original wartime set of panniers:

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    And it always helps to have good references for proper restorations:

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    Fahrräder vor!

    Patrick

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  15. DanielJones

    DanielJones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,042
    Location:
    On the move again...
    Some inspirational pics.
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    Do any of the folks here participate in any annual Tweed Rides in their area? Any pictures to share,either as participant or spectator?

    Cheers!

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011
  16. JeffOYB

    JeffOYB Vendor

    Messages:
    166
    Location:
    Michigan
  17. DanielJones

    DanielJones I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,042
    Location:
    On the move again...
    Very cool! Thank you for sharing those.
    Apparently there is one in the Portland, OR area too. I may have to check this one out next year, but first I need to get me a vintage or at least a vintage inspired bicycle.

    Cheers!

    Dan
     
  18. PADDY

    PADDY I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Messages:
    7,425
    Location:
    METROPOLIS OF EUROPA
    I've been out (and will be in a few minutes after penning this) around Northumberland on my 1930's TRIUMPH ROADSTER (see pics). It's a true roadster bike (note the handlebars, seating..etc) and is a very comfortable ride. Three Gear (High/Neutral/Low) Sturmey Archer config. Front and back lights have been rigged to a dynamo (think the back light is a later addition from 50/60's). Lovely leather Lycett saddle. Working in 'excellent' condition and has just been dismantled by an engineer and put together again with any needed work done. I'm training (and have been for several months to date) for a planned cycle ride I'm intending to do next year (My personality is wired to plan, prepare and train well in advance - and this challenge of mine requires a lot of physical training and logistical planning). Part of the challenge is doing it on a period appropriate bike (3 gears will be tough in parts) and *possibly* period gear too, though on modern roads I just *cannot* forgo a helmet, knowing from experience that it is a life saver.
    So the bike training has now moved from the modern hybrid over to the 1930's challenge bike.
    Am currently looking at some period'ish bags for the bike, such as Carradice or Brookes (not cheap). But have an old Barbour jacket and canvas gas mask bag which may be *transformed*
    See!! the Devil makes work for idle hands like mine!!

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  19. PADDY

    PADDY I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Messages:
    7,425
    Location:
    METROPOLIS OF EUROPA
    *NOTE*

    For the 'eagle eyed' (I *know* you're out there!), the old rubber handlebar grips have been replaced with more modern gell, because long distance it would be a killer - really! also I'm looking at taking the original pedals off (just for the challenge) and popping on metal toe clips which I find is more energy efficient and keeps the feet 'on' when getting tired or it's wet.

    *BIKE DETAILING - Is just amazing, little flip tops lead to inner reservoirs where you can pour your oil and it keeps the machinery well lubricated. Don't get that with my modern MTB, RACER, HYBRID..etc. It's the 'little' touches I love about these old bikes.

    *ADVICE* Am after period correct load carrier for the back (a rack) - where?
    I'll probably open up (if someone doesn't beat me to it) another thread on locating VINTAGE CYCLE WEAR & ACCESSORIES, as I'm after things from a brass bell to trouser clips, to wet weather gear to saddle bags.

    ALSO - best vintage bike forums on the WWW to get further information and help? - Thanks Chaps.
     
  20. Saint-Just

    Saint-Just One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Ashford, Kent - UK
    That is a superb piece of kit.

    Don't how you found it but congratulations. And good luck for your challenge
     

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