Pomade

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Slicksuit, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. Jan

    Jan One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    165
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Assuming he keeps his hair slicked down, and not in a pomp or contour... I'd suggest DELUXE Pomade. It leaves the hair with a matte finish, rather then any sheen. Plus, it's not sticky like other pomades, yet still has a decent hold. So I'd see that being a plus for him, since I doub't anyone would like to have a sweat and sticky pomade resin in the lining of his beret.

    McFarlane: I've heard of Dapper Man and contacted them a few months ago, but they never got back to me. How did get the pomade? Did you order from them or you found it another way?

    And about how difficult combing through pomade is.

    Here's a tip. (before it goes on my blog!)

    USE MULTIPLE COMBS! ;)

    I have a few big, wide toothed combs that I use. After I put in the pomade, I use the big comb to bring my hair back to the direction I want it. Then use a different comb to style it. It makes a world of difference when you're ripping through your scalp.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2010
  2. Nope, it's slicked down. Thank you so much for your help!! :)
     
  3. McFarlaneNYC

    McFarlaneNYC Familiar Face

    Messages:
    57
    Location:
    NYC
    Thanks for the tip with combing in the pomade. I have had a little bit of trouble with it but I have been getting better. I have more of a problem getting it out, especially Sweet Georgia Brown (blue), which is my new favorite pomade.
    On the Dapper Man,
    I bought it on their ebay store here:
    http://myworld.ebay.com/dappermanbrand/
    I used it today. It isn't like any other pomade I have very used, from the texture to the way it goes into the hair. It is neither soft (American Crew, Royal Crown) nor hard (Murray's) but rather melts at the touch of your fingers. It has a hard hold, but does not make your hair a shell like gel, and still remains playable the whole day. It is rather cold here in New York, and I think that may have something to do with the unique quality so far. I do like the hold on this pomade because it was perfect to get a nice pomp, which has been a struggle for me since I started to try to sport one. I best pomade I have used so far has been Sweet Georgia Brown (blue). I find American Crew is to easy to run out, Murrays is to tough (for me at least, I hate using it), and Royal Crown to greasy with little Hold. But thats just me.

    McFarlane

    P.S.
    Jan,
    Nice blog! filled with lots of good stuff.
     
  4. repeatclicks

    repeatclicks Practically Family

    Messages:
    606
    After a couple years of using every petroleum based pomade under the sun, I got sick of not being able to fully wash the stuff out, so I switched to Layrite and I'm glad I did.

    The biggest complaint I hear about this stuff is that it can't be recombed once it dries because you lose all the shine. While this may be true, the hold is very strong once dry (better than any petroleum based pomade I've used), and with a little extra layrite added on top after you comb it, it has a lovely shine to it.
     
  5. bluestone120

    bluestone120 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    169
    I've been using pomade for about a year now, and I've never strayed from Murray's. I have extremely thick and obstinate hair, so the heavy hold is greatly appreciated and always gives me the look I want; plus, I can continue to work with it after it's dried. Since picking up the habit, I've managed to find the happy-medium between a firm, shiny hold versus the excess: greasy pillowcases, women not being able to touch my hair, extensive removal washing, etc. I've been curious to try other pomades, but unfortunately, I'm lucky if I can even find Murray's up here, let alone other brands. I've noticed that AXE has thrown their hat in the ring, which strikes me as an odd contradiction, although they evidently offer four texture/hold varieties. I just bought a can of Dapper Man (thanks, McFarlane) and am checking out the brand experiences of other FL members.
     
  6. brylcreem boy

    brylcreem boy One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Is anybody using Sweet Georgia Brown in the Red Can? I don't sport a pompadour any longer, I now wear it side parted and slick the front back over the top to get a nice quiff(flip) in front. The SBG blue can is to heavy for my hair. I have been told that the Red Can and also Black and White may be the way to go, I want something with some hold but still a very high shine to it.
     
  7. Jan

    Jan One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    165
    Location:
    Bay Area
    The red can is heavier than the blue can. The purple tin is much like Royal Crown, but not as greasy as it is supposed to be water soluble.

    If you want something lighter than the blue can, Black & White, Dax Super-Neat/Short & Neat should do the trick.

    Of course, mixing a lighter pomade with any thicker pomade, will thin it out, making it more malleable.

    Check out my blog post about "cocktails."
     
  8. fluteplayer07

    fluteplayer07 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,844
    Location:
    Michigan
    I mix American Crew for the shine with Dapper Man for the hold. It works well, about a 3:1 ratio of the two, respectively.
     
  9. Wrangler95CSA

    Wrangler95CSA New in Town

    Messages:
    3
    I've found that the perfect mix is using Murray's AND Royal Crown. I've been rocking a pompadour for the past year and a half, so I've experimented with a lot of different pomades and waxes. In my trial and tribulations, I found that what works for my look (the 1950's greaser look), is a combination of the two. I use Murray's original pomade to get my hair into the pompadour. Because it's so thick, you've gotta heat it up to get it to apply correctly. I'd get it in my hands and either rub my hands together for about 15 seconds to get it warmed up and pliable, or hold my pomade covered hands over a burning candle, then apply it to my hair. It thickens back up rather quickly, so I use a hair dryer to get it hot so it melts. This actually is pretty effective, as it causes the Murrays to almost liquify, and getting down closer to your scalp, ensuring that your hair is coated in it, not just the upper layers. Then I run a comb through it, get it styled to how I want it, and then I reach for the Royal Crown. I use this as a topcoat as it doesn't really have a lot of strength as far as hold goes when you've got a longer hairstyle, but the SHINE is incredible. I apply this overtop of my already Murray's laden hair, run a comb through it again, step back, and admire.

    This may sound like a long drawn out process, but it really only takes about 5 minutes. After that, I've got the perfect pompadour that shines like a '49 Merc sparkling in the midday sunshine :)
     
  10. Jesse Jack

    Jesse Jack New in Town

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    Butte, MT
    This is a good thread, freakin' long, but awesome. I'm a big fan of the Royal Crown but am giving Murray's a whirl.

    I wear my hair slicked straight back and tight, the "Mike Ness" look.

    I've been working with the Royal Crown for a while but I picked up some while I was out of town and have not been able to find any in my locality. American Crew is out of the question because it's $17 for a little jar. Murray's it is.

    My method with the Crown has been to get my hair damp (either out of the shower or with a spray bottle), rub the stuff through my hair and mess it around until it's coated. Comb it through with HOT water once to get it distributed nicely. Slick it back with hands to get the general shape. Then comb it again to get the perfect look.

    I don't see what the fuss is about getting it out because one wash with Herbal Essences shampoo does the trick pretty well. I shower before bed. Sometimes there will still be a little bit left in but if I know I'm going to put more in in the morning, I just leave it. If not, a second wash takes it all out. Hot enough water will make the stuff less viscous and it'll come out easily enough.

    It seems that the ingredients in Royal Crown and Murray's are essentially the same. Look at the sides of the cans: petrolatum (ie: petroleum jelly aka Vaseline) some sort of oil (mineral on the Murray's, olive on RC) and fragrance. I would think the only real difference is the relative amount of ingredients. Therefor, I intend to try cutting the Murray's with a splash of mineral oil and see if it comes out more the consistency of RC. I'll let you know how it goes.
     
  11. brylcreem boy

    brylcreem boy One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Sounds like you got one hell of a pompadour- you need to post some pics of it. Royal crown is the shiniest but my girlfriend hates the way it smells and asked me to stop using it
     
  12. Alex

    Alex Practically Family

    Messages:
    643
    Location:
    Iowa, US
    Royal Crown is the shiniest stuff I've used. I've also found that my skin is very sensitive to pomade, so I gotta make sure that I don't have any on my skin. I generally have a side part with some kind of quiff. sometimes I slick it back. My hair isn't too long and it's decently thick. I usually like to use Brylcreem first, then RC Pomade or just the regular hair dressing. Gives it the hold and awesome shine. If I were to do a pomp, I would use Murray's or Dax Wave & Groom as the base, then RC for topcoat to give it shine. I still want to experiment with other pomades though.

    So do you guys wear hats with greasy pomade in your hair? I'm wondering if I shouldn't do that..
     
  13. FedoraFan112390

    FedoraFan112390 Practically Family

    Messages:
    643
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    "The wet head is dead"

    I was reading a post in the presidential hats thread, and apparently, in the '60s, it was thought that the ''wet head is dead'' due to JFK...Can someone explain this?

    Also, does anyone know what hair tonic Nixon and a lot of men of his generation might've used? I don't think it was Brylcreem.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

    Messages:
    13,719
    Location:
    USA
    Why not? Just curious............
     
  15. Californian poppy Oil was popular in Australia, especially for the hair
     
  16. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

    Messages:
    10,885
    Location:
    Portage, Wis.
    Wildroot, Vaselene Hair Tonic, Murrays, Tres Flores, Groom n' Clean, Brylcreem, the list goes on.
     
  17. skyvue

    skyvue Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,221
    Location:
    New York City
    Vitalis was another.

    The Wet Head is Dead was a slogan for some haircare product or other.
     
  18. brylcreem boy

    brylcreem boy One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    260
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    I believe it was a slogan for the "Dry Look" HairSpray, by Gillette. Funny, during that time during the 70's when everbody had the dry fluffy center parted hair my dad made me keep a short back and sides, and every Sunday it got the Brylcreem treatment for church. Funny how things come back around, 30 years later I'm back to the short back and sides, and this time lovin it
     
  19. AtomicEraTom

    AtomicEraTom

    Messages:
    10,885
    Location:
    Portage, Wis.
    My dad still has his lol lol lol

     
  20. Todays hair products are so superior to anything from the 50's, Would you use a 1940;s Toothpowder?

    http://www.mukme.com/

    Muk doubles the thickness of your hair, i Love it
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011

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