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Show us their suits

Flat Foot Floey

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,220
Location
Germany
tumblr_n7fg6kg73z1r5rhsmo1_500.jpg

A dandy from Harlem, photgraphed by James Vanderzee in 1932.
 

Metatron

One Too Many
Messages
1,536
Location
United Kingdom
Not 1930s, forgive me for the small deviation, but this suit from The Wickerman is wonderful and timeless:




I think the green shirt looks great with that tweed.
 

Fastuni

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,277
Location
Germany
1945 - Berlin theater play with famous Communist singer/actor Ernst Busch wearing a very interesting belted sport coat.

The fur-brimmed coat of the other guy in the first photo is rather unique:

df_pk_0000035_007.jpg

df_pk_0000035_003.jpg
 
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TSP13

Familiar Face
Messages
91
Location
South Carolina
Up until the late 1930's seersucker was considered somewhat of a poor mans suit, and wasn't popular outside of the southern United States. Seersucker only gained popularity when the college kids, then the actors, and then the Duke of Windsor starting wearing it.
 

Flat Foot Floey

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,220
Location
Germany
Even then I am surprised of the lack of pictures. Other working mans suits like blue Serge or even denim workwear have more photographs than seersucker, don't they?
 

Fastuni

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,277
Location
Germany
They were certainly more prevalent than the lack of photos might indicate.

Brooks Brothers ads from 1935 claim that seersucker summer suits are making a revival "in the past few years".
Long popular in the Southern US it apparently became somewhat more prevalent in the Northern states during the 1930's.
Business week of 1932 claims that New York retailers saw an 25% increase in seersucker, Palm Beach and linen sales.
LIFE magazine of 1939 has an article "Northerners succumb to summer suits" describing seersucker: "one of the oldest of cotton fabrics, has been used for men's suit since centuries [...] popular in the South, Northerners balk because it looks unpressed."
Throughout the 20's and early 30's Farmers Bulletin lists the uses of seersucker as: "Night clothing, house dresses, shirts, children's garments ; heavier qualities, men's suits."

Trying to glean information from the English and German wikipedia can be confusing... the English entry describes it as a poor man's suit in the South until the 20's, while the German entry has it as popular among Southern senators after it's introduction in New Orleans at the beginning of the 20th century. Both are dubious at best IMO. While certainly used for workwear, the references above indicate that it was also used for "good suits".

Also, while it usually is associated with the Southern US, it was introduced to the Western hemisphere by the British, who apparently picked it up in India. "Seersucker" is derived from the Persian "shir-o-shekar" (milk and sugar), describing the yellowish-white stripes. A seersucker turban was until the late 19th century a frequent "trademark" of Persian merchants.
 
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Two Types

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,456
Location
London, UK
The Girl in the Taxi (1937)

Mackenzie Ward wearing a nice four pocket suit:
Wardsuit1_zps4d5f1615.jpg

Wardsuit2_zps838c8c03.jpg


Lawrence Grossmith in a wide peaked lapel, single breasted suit:
grossmithsuit_zpsd6fc7d50.jpg

Wardsuit3_zps2f346c68.jpg


(Grossmith was the son of George Grossmith, author of the wonderful Diary of a Nobody. Furthermore, his niece Ena starred in the 1926 film Oxford Bags, and was married to Montague Lambert who was claimed as one of the inventors of 'Oxford Bags')

How to illustrate the age gap between father and son: father goes out wearing white tie, son wears black tie.
Agegap-WardampGrossmith_zpsdcaad531.jpg
 

Two Types

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,456
Location
London, UK
I'm increasingly interested in jackets with four patch pockets. I like the way that the extra pocket turns what would be a fairly plain suit into something quite distinctive. That must be my next target.
 

Two Types

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,456
Location
London, UK
More film grabs, this time from 'Dandy Dick' (1935)

Esmond Knight:
esmondsuit1_zps272ad2ed.jpg


Another outfit worn by Esmond Knight. I really like this outfit:
knightoutfit4_zpsa983a262.jpg

knightoutfit3_zpse84b0603.jpg

knightoutfit2_zps70c36a95.jpg


Something for the knitwear fans:
Jumper2_zpscbc03900.jpg

Jumper3_zps544961ff.jpg

Jumper_zpsb53b5879.jpg


Will Hay:
Haysuit1_zpsa16936e1.jpg

Haysuit2_zpsd87a074a.jpg


A rather high buttoning waistcoat:
Highwaistcoat_zpsca9464b1.jpg
 

MikeBravo

One Too Many
Messages
1,301
Location
Melbourne, Australia
They were certainly more prevalent than the lack of photos might indicate.

Brooks Brothers ads from 1935 claim that seersucker summer suits are making a revival "in the past few years".
Long popular in the Southern US it apparently became somewhat more prevalent in the Northern states during the 1930's.
Business week of 1932 claims that New York retailers saw an 25% increase in seersucker, Palm Beach and linen sales.
LIFE magazine of 1939 has an article "Northerners succumb to summer suits" describing seersucker: "one of the oldest of cotton fabrics, has been used for men's suit since centuries [...] popular in the South, Northerners balk because it looks unpressed."
Throughout the 20's and early 30's Farmers Bulletin lists the uses of seersucker as: "Night clothing, house dresses, shirts, children's garments ; heavier qualities, men's suits."

Trying to glean information from the English and German wikipedia can be confusing... the English entry describes it as a poor man's suit in the South until the 20's, while the German entry has it as popular among Southern senators after it's introduction in New Orleans at the beginning of the 20th century. Both are dubious at best IMO. While certainly used for workwear, the references above indicate that it was also used for "good suits".

Also, while it usually is associated with the Southern US, it was introduced to the Western hemisphere by the British, who apparently picked it up in India. "Seersucker" is derived from the Persian "shir-o-shekar" (milk and sugar), describing the yellowish-white stripes. A seersucker turban was until the late 19th century a frequent "trademark" of Persian merchants.

It occurs to me that you have the resources at hand to update the Wikipedia entries. After all the idea of a wiki is for people to contribute information, and if you can reference contemporary publications you can post with some authority. At the moment the English entry has only modern references, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seersucker
 

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