The casualization of the world

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Matt Deckard, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. Matt Deckard

    Matt Deckard Man of Action

    "I'll wear them maybe twice a year for special occasions -- for a dinner or a graduation,"

    read this

    He may not think of wearing a pair of captoes to a graduation, but at least he has a sense of occasion.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  2. Totally insane. I see that they're asking as much as $300-400 for them on eBay.
     
  3. Travis Lee Johnston

    Travis Lee Johnston Practically Family

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    The comments under the article pretty much cover it, misspellings aside.
     
  4. Feraud

    Feraud Bartender

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    Hardlucksville, NY
    The article is about the sneaker collector. Compare the sneaker prices to guys here paying big bucks for used hats! ;)

    I'll tell ya what's killing this world- dames in sportswear!
     
  5. m0nk

    m0nk One Too Many

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    Sad.... just sad....
     
  6. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Sneakers to a formal dinner?

    We're screwed...
     
  7. Twill

    Twill One of the Regulars

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    Baton Rouge, LA
    Agree with the first point... not so much the second.

    People collect, what people collect. Sneakers, hats, Victorian furniture, cat statues, whatever. Its all the same... just stuff people like a lot.
     
  8. dhermann1

    dhermann1 I'll Lock Up

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    The thing about this is that the company creates the demand by making them rare. In other collectables, the value comes first from the QUALITY being recognized, and then the rarity adds to the value. This is like Beany Babies and those dopey porcelain figurines of children kissing, and those equally dopey Franklin Mint "coins".
    Your Chippendale chair will retain its value, these will crash some day.
     
  9. Oldsarge

    Oldsarge One Too Many

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    Some day soon. It' like Pokimon coins or modern baseball cards. Anything made deliberately for collecting will have no value whatsoever within five years, max. Besides, he's a kid. What does he know about anything? I swear, the voting age should be raised to thirty!
     
  10. That has got to be one of the dumbest things I have ever read shakeshead

    Nice new avatar by the way :)

    I guess I better get rid of those sweats with juicy written on the butt that I was going to wear for the QM event ..... kidding :p
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  11. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    I agree with the Sarge.

    If it's made for collecting, chances are it won't be that valuable. Unless it's a REAL collector's item (like there's literally only ever been ONE made or something).

    Otherwise...they're ordinary sneakers.
     
  12. On the original topic, two thoughts.
    1. I have been dismayed at the ridiculous appearance of casual footwear for at least the past twenty years: 'athletic shoes' are laughably Lil' Abner boat-shaped globs and made of hideous materials and colors but evidently satisfy a pop culture fueled demand because they just keep getting sillier (see original story link for Exhibit A).
    2. Sadly, this trend is inexorable, like the creep of casual wear in places unheard of even a decade ago, such as 'nice' restaurants and bars that once had dress codes. There will be no Renaissance of Golden Age fashion, but we can be thankful wearing 'normal' clothes can be done for the forseeable future without too much ridicule. Just lay offa my.... shoes, man.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  13. repeatclicks

    repeatclicks Practically Family

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    You think $300-400 is bad for a pair of sneakers? Look up auction results for the Nike McFly 2015 shoes from Back To The Future. At upwards of $3000 a pair, your nose will start to bleed....

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nike-Air-Ma...Men_s_Shoes&hash=item3a6dd3d1f3#ht_500wt_1352

    The original auctions fetched prices upwards of $7000, but those were charity bids for the Michael J. Fox Parkinsons Research Foundation. The guy that paid for the pair in the auction above just bought them for himself. Yup.
     
  14. repeatclicks

    repeatclicks Practically Family

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    606
    Fashion has always had elements of silliness in them, be it footwear, trousers, tops, and definitely some hats! Clothes from all decades had some items that were made of hideous materials and colours to satisfy a pop culture, the difference here is that it has been rather unending since the 1980s with trainers being collectable.

    Ever lay eyes on a 1950s Day-Glo shirt from Welgrume? I rest my case.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. repeatclicks

    repeatclicks Practically Family

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  16. repeatclicks

    repeatclicks Practically Family

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    So... for instance... this horrible 'collectors edition' bear from 1994... apparently worthless according to you, but look! Someone just paid $350 for it:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1994-Limite...ultDomain_0&hash=item1e67633eac#ht_500wt_1352

    Or this naff Budweiser 'collectors edition' beer stein from 1981... not worth $105?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1981-Collec...ultDomain_0&hash=item19cb0e1391#ht_500wt_1352

    My point is that things will always have a value to someone, collectors edition or not. Even tinkerbell holding a baseball bat ($103).

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Limited-Edi...ultDomain_0&hash=item53e9549b37#ht_500wt_1156
     
  17. Lily Powers

    Lily Powers Practically Family

    Ditto on the prices for vintage dresses. And on the bright side, no one here has reported any strong-armed robberies or assaults in an effort to take our vintage goodies.

    I may not agree with the aesthetic beauty or price value of those shoes, or how Nike promotes them and then lets the crowds have a free-for-all to purchase them, but I have to appreciate that collecting them is as important to someone as my collection of vintage lovelies. Having been the recipient of snark for dressing differently than my peers in high school, I'll never put someone down for their passion about something that is important to them. :)
     
  18. resortes805

    resortes805 Call Me a Cab

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    The guy is a sneakerphile, he has as much a right to pay ridiculous amounts of money for something that others may see little value in as any of the vintage clothing enthusiasts on the Fedora Lounge.

    I collect striped t-shirts. They are pretty much worthless, but I like how they look on me. I have some that I wear all the time, and some that I save for special occasions. I have some that I paid stupid amounts of money for, but that I feel were well worth it.

    This guy is no different.
     
  19. Aside from the right and respect of collecting in general, I think this topic has more resonance of the ridiculous with those of us who can remember only a few sneaker makers (Converse, Red Ball Jets, Keds), and styles, (high cut, low cut, black or white), circa 1960 or so. Who knew it would ever morph into this?
    I applaud the courage and financial generosity of anyone spending these sums for shoes that have so little aesthetic appeal for so many. Go for it.
     
  20. $180 is not very much money for a collector. What's that, like 50p at today's exchange rate? As for the comments underneath the article, the less said the better.

    I remember the Nike throwback styles they brought out in the late 90s. A shop in Aberdeen that was early in on the LVC gear also stocked all the Nike stuff. Man, they were cheap back then, too, like LVC was. Shoulda bought some pairs …

    bk
     

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