Vintage Appliances

Discussion in 'Your Vintage Home' started by Rosie, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,429
    Location:
    New York City
    Papperskat - nice find and purchase. As it sounds as if you are gong to do some work on, it would be fun if you kept us up on the progress.

    Thanks to Shangas' kind comment, I have sent the above (6 or so posts) lighter off for repair and will report back with photos when I get it.
     
  2. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    In the US, Electrolux was a gas refrigerator -- there are no electrical or moving parts anywhere in the mechanism, and as long as the pipes are good and the refrigerant is holding, they have, basically, an infinite lifespan. There are hundreds of them around here still in use at camps and on off-the-grid farms, converted to run on LP gas.
     
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,429
    Location:
    New York City
    Once again, calling on the kind patience of Lizziepedia:

    I, at a very simple level, understand how refrigeration works - gas is compressed and then allowed to expand, thus absorbing heat and "chilling" the ambient air, but how does the gas circulate (what compresses it) in the Electrolux if there is no electricity / moving parts?
     
  4. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

    Messages:
    506
    Location:
    Sweden
    Huh, I've never heard about gas refrigerators before. Interesting. The few Swedish Electrolux fridges that I know about have all been electric so I hope that this one is too... If not then I might put the innards of my late 40s/50s Husqvarna fridge inside the body.

    FF, yes, I'll try to remember to post updates. It will probably be a while before I get to it, though. I'm working on a blog where I'll put everything about the restoration of my house, I'll post a link when it's online.
     
  5. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    [​IMG]

    The Crosley "Icy-Ball" worked by the same principle, except that there was no internal flame to act as a heat source. With an "Icy-Ball," you lifted out the mechanism once a day and heated it gently on a stove until the ammonia re-condensed, and then you replaced the unit in the cabinet.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015
  6. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,429
    Location:
    New York City
    Lizzie, thank you, but the link (I think) you embedded gave me this message:

    "Remote Linking Forbidden - 50megs does not support remote linking of images or files for FREE accounts - please upgrade your account."

    Obviously, I don't want you to do anything more (thank you for trying), I just wanted you to know that I wasn't able to read the explanation.
     
  7. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
  8. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
  9. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Try this -- it's easier to explain visually than verbally. Basically it's the principle of evaporation and condensation in a sealed environment.

    HowItWorks_02.JPG
     
  10. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
  11. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
  12. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,429
    Location:
    New York City
    Thank you. And how fantastic is that. All it needs is the natural gas flame to keep the process repeating itself (that's what was troubling me when you said there was no electricity or moving parts).

    Computer this, smart phone that, programer here, technician there - they have nothing on the person that came up with that refrigeration system.
     
  13. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    The "Icy-Ball" is even more astonishing. If you ever see one in person, you'll have a hard time believing it exists, let alone that it works.

    [​IMG]

    Come the apocalypse, there'll still be refrigeration thanks to people like this guy, who built his own Icy Ball from scrounged junk.
     
  14. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
    Quote:
    " High pressures are involved. The Icyball can leak or explode resulting in death or serious injury. Exposure to ammonia can cause serious injury or death"
    That will work but
    I think that was Szilard and Einstein were trying to avoid
     
  15. Papperskatt

    Papperskatt Practically Family

    Messages:
    506
    Location:
    Sweden
    Wow!
     
  16. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,723
    Location:
    Nebo, NC
    Anyone have any good sources for replacement elements for an electric range? My old 1948 model Hotpoint bake element gave out yesterday. I had replaced it several years ago with a spare element my Dad had secured and had in storage. The part number is WB44X142. I've found several places that have replacement parts, but that one is "discontinued" on all the sites I've found.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  17. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
  18. Big Man

    Big Man My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,723
    Location:
    Nebo, NC
    Thanks for the help and the links, ingineer.

    I looked in all the usual places but couldn't find anything right off. On the off-chance they might have something, I went by a little hardware store here in Marion (small town, real hardware kind of store). They didn't have one like I needed, but said they knew of a place that might have one. I gave that place a call, and BINGO they had not one, but three. The store is in a little town about 20 miles from here, so I'll be going there tomorrow.

    Might as well get all three of them while I can, that way I should be covered for the next 20 or 30 years. WAIT - did I just say that? That sounds like the way my Dad used to think.
     
  19. ingineer

    ingineer One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,098
    Location:
    Clifton NJ
    Lucky you to have found a good hardware store.
    Reminds me of an old story
    The carpenter went to to the old church,
    Sorry Minister the old oak beams are rotten and can not be replaced.
    The Minister shoke his head and said:
    See those Oaks outside:
    That is what they intended for
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.